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Forever Changes: Expanded And Remastered

January 29, 2007 | Format: MP3

Product Details

  • Original Release Date: January 1, 1999
  • Release Date: January 29, 2007
  • Label: Rhino/Elektra
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:13:48
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00124HT8O
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: MP3 Music
Forever Changes is still one of my favorite albums, and it amazes me now how I keep going back to it, and how much I respect this highly original work of art. I believe that it is one of the best folk-rock albums of our era, and personally like it better than most albums of the past forty years. Like everyone says it fit the times perfectly: the summer of love, Viet-nam, psychedelics, long hair, blues and rock and all the rest. We forget how new all this was, how radical and different. Just a few years back people were listening to insipid pop music-- that is the white people were. Does anyone remember Bobby Rydel and Paul Anka? And like everyone else who adores the album it is a startling and dynamic mix of music and poetry. Mr Lee and his partner Bryan McLean wrote lyrics that were ahead of almost everyone else: enigmatic, lovely, revolutionary and with some vivid imagery that perfectly fit the passion, angst and turmoil of the times. Also amazing is how well this album has held up: it is still fresh and new! Most albums of the time are dated, sometimes embarrassingly so. Frankly I do not know how they accomplished this album at such a young age, Arthur Lee in his early twenties. I read the book about Love, and examined almost everything that has been written about them, and tried to understand what went into making this remarkable work of music. I have come to the opinion, right or wrong, that it was a surprising combination of people who were just right for the album and the time.Read more ›
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Format: Audio CD
There was no other collection of songs that captures the essence of melancholy more perfectly than Forever Changes. This is not a happy hippie album, but an elegy of loss, alienation and death that is profound, strange, unsparing, hypnotic and unsentimental. It mesmerizes with its head-long plunge into the swirling blue abyss.

Consider these lyrics from You Set the Scene:

“This is the time in life that I am living, and I’ll face each day with a smile, for the time that I’ve been given is such a little while, and the things that I must do consist of more than style. There are places that I am going. This is the only thing that I am sure of, and that’s all that lives is gonna die. And there will always some people here to wonder why, and for every happy hello there will be goodbye. There’ll be time for you to put yourself on.”

The Doors would not have existed without the influence of Love and Arthur Lee and this brilliant album. Nor would Frank Black and the Pixies. Arthur Lee was the first artist who dared to be weird, to play with his lyrics, to add layers of complexity, to change melodies in the middle of songs, to continuously bombard his audience with the unexpected. It wasn't exactly commercial stuff, but it has endured.

I was fortunate--blessed actually--to see one of Arthur Lee's last performances with Love. You could tell that he was beaten down by life, but his spirit was indomitable.

"I don't know if I am living or if I'm supposed to be. Sometimes my life is so eerie, and if you think I'm happy..."

No one said it better or more universally, not even Morrisey.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
A darker take or reflection of the times than what was being made in San Francisco...much like their counterparts the Doors another LA band they represented the dark underbelly of sunny California. The songs have a real east LA flavor due to the acoustic guitars & mariachi horns and the lyrics are cryptic and surreal. Like Jim Morrison, Arthur Lee had a strong death fixation when creating this music!
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Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
Great music for listening to in the car. Good melodies and tunes that are more memrable than most of todays FM radio music.
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Format: Audio CD
One of the best albums from the 60's. Sort of obscure band- I didn't know about them until a few years ago. I'd rate this up there with Sargent Pepper's.

Great fan video here: http://youtu.be/_ZZhAoFokJw
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Format: Audio CD
After their West Coast 'Rock Music' self-titled debut album in July 1966 - LOVE progressed rapidly for Elektra Records to the more accomplished "Da Capo" in November 1966. But it was their third album "Forever Changes" released Stateside in late November 1967 (February 1968 in the UK) that fully realized the band’s songwriting magic and is the 'one' LP in their fractured canon of work that has stayed in people's hearts - even grown in stature.

Yet in the hallowed hindsight of 2015 it seems strange now to think of "Forever Changes" as a commercial disaster on its 1967 release - when for nearly three decades it has regularly topped the 'best albums ever' lists. In 2005 it was even given the prestige of true cult status by making the "1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die" book. Yet "Forever Changes" crawled onto the American charts – making it to a lowly No. 154 in the first week of 1968 (months after release) – worse than the No. 80 placing of "Da Capo" in February 1967. Over here in Blighty when it was belatedly released in February 1968 where it did far better – rising to 24 in that same month. Those canny Brits andmoreagain eh. Here are the 'movies from tomorrow'...

UK released October 2001 – "Forever Changes: Remastered & Expanded" by LOVE on Elektra/Rhino/Warner Strategic Marketing (R2 73537) 8122-73537-2 (Barcode 081227353728) is a single CD that offers the Stereo mix of the LP as well as seven bonus tracks (five Previous Unissued). It plays out as follows (74:22 minutes):

1. Alone Again Or
2. A House Is Not A Hotel
3. Andmoreagain
4. The Daily Planet
5. Old Man
6. The Red Telephone
7. Maybe The People Would Be The Times Or Between Clark And Hilldale [Side 2]
8.
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