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Forgotten Millions: The Modern Jewish Exodus from Arab Lands Paperback – October 27, 2000

ISBN-13: 978-0826447647 ISBN-10: 0826447643

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 258 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic (October 27, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0826447643
  • ISBN-13: 978-0826447647
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.5 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #524,034 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"These essays by ten scholars of Middle Eastern history dealing with the exodus of Jews from Arab lands, where they had lived in some instances for 2,500 years, should be required reading....This book provides an in-depth history and analysis of minorities in Arab countries, with its special focus on Jews. Although half a century has elapsed since the beginning of the refugee problems, both Jewish and Arab...this book corrects the distortions of Arab claims and presents substantial evidence supporting the contention that the Jews failed to receive recognition by the international community of their plight."—Emuna Magazine

"These essays by ten scholars of Middle Eastern history dealing with the exodus of Jews from Arab lands where they had lived, in some instances, for 2,500 years, should be required reading for those discussing the question of compensation or return of Palestinian refugees as part of a peace agreement with Arafat. . . . This book provides an in-depth history and analysis of the situation of minorities in Arab countries, with its special focus on Jews. . . . The Forgotten Millions is an important and timely volume which focuses on people whose history we have almost forgotten, whose exodus, resettlement and restitution claims have been overshadowed by the Holocaust and by the more recent immigrations from the Soviet Union and Ethiopia. . . . This book corrects the distortions of Arab claims."-Emunah Magazine

"[The essays] highlight important issues of which readers should be better aware."—Jewish Book World

"This book is a scholarly work and a fascinating one at that....Read the book; see if you agree."—The Jewish Press and The Jewish Post and Opinion

About the Author

Malka Hillel Shulewitz is a lecturer and writer. She has participated in the work of many organizations, including serving for seventween years as Executive Director and Publications Editor of the Israel Academic Committee on the Middle East, and is a founding member of the World Organization of Jews from Arab Countries.

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Customer Reviews

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39 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Andrew G. Bostom on February 17, 2002
Format: Paperback
In �Jews and Arabs� (New York, Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1975), the author Albert Memmi, a Sephardic Jew, observed the following: � ..The head of an Arab state recently made us a generous and novel offer. �Return,� he told us, �return to the land of your birth! Are you not Arabs like us- Arab Jews?�. What lovely words! We draw a secret nostalgia from them: yes, indeed we were Arab Jews- in our habits, our culture, our music, our menus. I have written enough about it. But must one remain an Arab Jew if, in return, one has to tremble for one�s life and the future of one�s children and always be denied a normal existence? There are, it is true, the Arab Christians. What is not sufficiently known is the shamefully exorbitant price that they must pay for the right merely to survive.�
�The Forgotten Millions� is a compendium of nine thoughtfully interwoven essays which present a compelling sociopolitical discussion of the unheralded expulsion of ~ 850,000 Jews from Arab North Africa and the Middle East between 1941 and 1976. The presentation by Ya�akov Meron debunks a widely held misconception that this Jewish exodus resulted solely from the creation of the state of Israel in 1948. After documenting the brutal Iraqi (1941), Egyptian (1945), and Libyan (1945) pogroms inspired by local Arab movements sympathetic to the Nazis, as well as the anti-Jewish riots in Aleppo and Aden of 1947, the author rightfully asks how these events could �..be attributed to the State [of Israel] in 1948?�.
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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful By M. D Roberts on December 11, 2002
Format: Paperback
This book tells the disturbing story of the unprovoked expulsion and ethnic cleansing of the Jewish populations from the Arab countries in the Middle East surrounding the re-birth of the State of Israel in 1948.
The book is extremely disturbing one two counts. On one count that such an ethnic cleansing and racial segregation of the Jews could be allowed to occur in the modern day, (especially so soon after the Second World War & the Holocaust), and in another regard that such a forced expulsion could be so soon forgotten and overlooked by the International Community & it's media, which have both clearly chosen to turn a blind eye to this issue.
Any accurate assessment of the Arab-Israeli conflict is indeed incomplete without addressing this very troubling subject.
Whilst some readers will inevitably draw an initial correlation to the Palestinian refugee issue, it only becomes too apparent that there are some fundamental differences.
With appropriate references to the brutal Iraqi (1941), Egyptian (1945), and Libyan (1945) pogroms inspired by local Arab movements extremely sympathetic to the Nazis/Final Solution, together with the anti-Jewish riots in Aleppo and Aden of 1947, the writer correctly asks how these events could in any way '...be attributed to the State of Israel in 1948 ?'.
As the book unfolds one is also faced with the cold, callous indictment that this forcible expulsion of the Jews, effectively made the Arab worl Judenrein. The Jews,- whose families had inhabited these Arab lands for thousands of years, leaving with only the possessions that they could carry, being robbed of homes, businesses, and all their worldly possessions by their Arab `overlords'.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Jill Malter on December 26, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book is a collection of nine articles that deal with the treatment of minorities in Arab lands in general, and the expulsion of Jews in particular.

Mordechai Nisan begins with an discussion of the treatment of minorities by the Islamic world. That includes Jews, Copts, Armenians, Kurds, Maronites, Assyrians, and Berbers. He also asks about the status of those people who say they have been represented by Arafat. Such people have been at the forefront of the fight against minority rights. Are they really a minority as well?

Next, Walid Phares gives a report on Middle Eastern Christians. He includes the ones in southern Sudan. It's similar in most places: the Christians are vanishing from the region. And there is a systematic, general, and political abandonment of these Christians by the West.

Bat Ye'or talks about the role of dhimmitude in the exodus of the Jews from Arab countries. Dhimmis have no right to life, but must purchase it by humbly paying "protection money" to real people. Bat Ye'or reminds us that dhimmis are not slaves. They can and do earn money. That enables them to pay taxes. But they lack rights. For example, they are not permitted to defend themselves from physical attack by Muslims or testify against Muslims in court.

The fact that dhimmis are not slaves does suggest a solution to the Arab-Israeli conflict. Israel, by paying sufficient protection money and humbly apologizing for existing, might be tolerated as a dhimmi nation. And then again, it still might not be tolerated.

Bat Ye'or reminds us that the Muslim world would be better off were it to denounce dhimmitude. Otherwise, Muslim relations with other nations will be adversely affected, as will interactions of Muslims and non-Muslims in the West.
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