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  • NexTrend Garlic Twist - Clear
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NexTrend Garlic Twist - Clear


Price: $16.99 + $7.32 shipping
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by KITCHEN COUTURE.
  • Easy and fun to use
  • Multipurpose, try ginger, olive, chili pepper, onion, herbs, nuts and more!
  • Minces entire garlic clove, leaving no waste
  • Safe and simple to rinse clean
  • Lifetime warranty for durability

Kitchen Shorts
$16.99 + $7.32 shipping In Stock. Ships from and sold by KITCHEN COUTURE.

Frequently Bought Together

NexTrend Garlic Twist - Clear + NexTrend 3rd Generation Clear Garlic Twist (1, A) + Zak Designs E-Z-Rol Garlic Peeler (Blue)
Price for all three: $39.98

These items are shipped from and sold by different sellers.

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Product Description

Perfect for Garlic peeling and easy to clean

Product Details

  • Shipping Weight: 7 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • ASIN: B000173JMS
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (91 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #115,961 in Kitchen & Dining (See Top 100 in Kitchen & Dining)
  • Product Warranty: For warranty information about this product, please click here

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Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

49 of 51 people found the following review helpful By K. Strand on December 12, 2006
I've owned the Garlic Twist for years, so I've figured out how to get the best use out of it. I peel the garlic clove(s) using a chef's knife (as described below), then cut each clove into half. That makes it much easier to get the twist going. It is very difficult to get it started with large garlic cloves, but works well if you cut them in half. It's still better and faster than mincing them. My other pice of advice: Don't wash it in the dishwasher! I got lazy and washed mine on the top shelf of my dishwasher and the plastic cracked, allowing water in. I'm ordering another one (after three years of use) because of this. I'll be hand-washing from now on!
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33 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Fillmoe VINE VOICE on June 5, 2006
This was an impulse purchase, but I use it almost every day. Smash the cloves with the cover to remove the skins, then drop the cloves (I've used up to five) into the container and slowly lower and twist the cover. The garlic gets shredded and pushed into two little triangles for easy use.

The first time I used it, I had wet hands and had trouble doing the twisting, but after a couple of tries, I was loving it.
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I've noticed everybody here either loves this thing or hates it. Honestly, I am "stuck in the middle." Does it work? Yes! Will I reach for it every time I'm dealing with garlic? Maybe not.

A couple of drawbacks you don't hear about:
~ It doesn't handle large garlic cloves very well
~ Low-waste, but not zero waste
~ Hard to begin the "twisting" process
~ Awkward for small hands

One of the big pros of this device is that supposedly it doesn't waste garlic like presses do - they always leave behind that compressed "mat" of garlic that you can't use (depending what I'm cooking, I sometimes do).

However, the Garlic Twist does leave behind waste in the form of garlic left between the teeth that you really can't get out except for rinsing. I suppose you could poke out each morsel with a sharp knife, but honestly, that's as fiddly as cleaning out a garlic press, so I don't - just rinse the bits out when I'm done using the twist.

Cleanup is indeed a heck of a lot faster than with a classic garlic press. However, one of my big garlic "secrets" is that I usually don't press it - I grate it with a small flat grater I use just for garlic and ginger (oh: don't try ginger in your Garlic Twist - it gums it up). And the grater just rinses & wipes clean, so easier to clean than the press OR the twist. :-)

This might make a nice gift for a foodie person who wants perfectly mushed-up garlic quickly. Especially a man, who would be more likely to have the larger hands it takes to do the first couple of twists. It may allow you to throw away your garlic press, but seriously, try a grater first - mine was a buck or two at a dollar store.
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64 of 77 people found the following review helpful By Serendipity on November 29, 2006
I bought one of these a few months ago but unfortunately it spends a lot more time in my kitchen drawer than my regular garlic press. Here is what I do like about it:

1. The idea of whacking an unpeeled clove of garlic in order to take the skin off more easily is great, but this can be done with any hard, flat object or even the side of a chef's knife blade.

2. Unlike a garlic press, the Garlic Twist gives you uniform pieces of chopped garlic. A garlic press leaves you with a flattened skin that you have to either discard or chop up by hand.

UNFORTUNATELY, and this is where the garlic press wins out by my standards, it is difficult for my lady-like hands to "get the Garlic Twist going." After the garlic has gone through a few destructive twists, it is simple enough to continue until you reach the desired size of chunks. However, the first few twists are quite difficult to execute, as you have to press the two parts together quite hard, while simultaneously turning them, to keep them from popping apart and jumping over the garlic rather than punching through it. This problem occurs even with just one clove.

Interesting idea, but the classic garlic press is still my favorite. Sometimes I grate garlic on a ginger grater or a Microplane grater. For larger quantities, the Zyliss chopper might do the job but I've never tried. For the Garlic Twist, however, the drawbacks out-weigh the advantages.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Prof. M. Lancaster on May 11, 2010
Verified Purchase
I tried numerous garlic presses and I tried cutting/mincing it manually. I ended up with things with a millions nooks and crannies to wash afterward and/or with a half clove not having gone thru the press and/or fingers that stank for days later. I was in the process of researching my next garlic press, hoping to find some revolutionary new design when I happened upon this device.

It looked like flimsy plastic schlock in the pictures but I bought it anyway. When I got it, I was instantly surprised by how solid and sturdy it actually was. I was then a bit apprehensive about the "teeth" inside the two parts; I figured sooner or later they'd break off. Well, so far, so good!

I progressively used two, three and even four cloves at a time and minced them to perfection. Those who complain about the twisting action being strenuous on the wrists, I found it not to be. The trick is to not press the two parts tightly together and twist but give them a bit of leeway: Cusp them just enough for one part to get into the other and start twisting as you press the two sections closer together.

I found what works best for getting the minced garlic out is the back (i.e. the handle) of a fork or spoon; at any rate, nothing pointy or sharp because that would just not work as well.

Cleaning is a cinch: A rinse will get rid of any leftover pieces, so no need to poke around the thing trying to get the stubborn cling-ons out! I don't have a dishwasher so I dip both sides into a bowl of washing up liquid and they come out smelling of lemon.

I don't write product reviews very often but this item REALLY impressed me. I'm not anything approaching a chef and use this twice, maybe three times a week.
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