Found Memories (English Subtitled) 2012 PG-13

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(14) IMDb 7.1/10
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Rita, a young wandering photographer, finds herself in a secluded mountain village where she discovers transcendence in the resident's everyday lives. Official selection - Toronto IFF.

Starring:
Lisa Fávero, Sonia Guedes
Runtime:
1 hour 37 minutes

Found Memories (English Subtitled)

Product Details

Genres Drama, International
Director Júlia Murat
Starring Lisa Fávero, Sonia Guedes
Supporting actors Ricardo Merkin, Luiz Serra
Studio Film Movement
MPAA rating PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)

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Slow, quiet, dreamy, very moving.
Steve Peters
The deliberate pace coupled with striking visuals and brilliant cinematography adds to the beauty of the film.
quentin
If ever a film will want you to take up bread making, this is it.
Jenski

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By K. Harris HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on December 22, 2012
Format: DVD
Without a doubt, I haven't seen a quieter movie than "Found Memories" in quite some time. This intriguing Brazilian film unfolds like a surreal dream, but it requires a certain patience for its payoff. As very little is explained, I found myself attempting to fill in the pieces of its rather enigmatic characters. While it's easy to accept everything in the movie at a surface level, I found almost supernatural undertones as the story unfolded. Perhaps I'm crazy, and that might be the case, but I read a lot into "Found Memories" whether director Julia Murat intended me to or not. The movie has a silent power and it was quite a while before I realized just how swept up in the film I was. And ultimately, I was surprised that this nearly wordless endeavor drew me so deeply into my own head!

The tale itself is rather simple and unremarkable. In the rural village of Jotuomba, life has settled into a very ordinary routine. We meet a stoic baker, Madalena, who bakes bread, lives in relative isolation, and spends her evening penning letters to a lost love. Every day, same thing. Even her interactions with the church and the local coffee shop owner follow a precise and unwavering pattern. One day, a young photographer shows up on her doorstep looking for a place to stay for a few days. Little more explanation is given and the ladies cohabitate in a rather disconnected manner. But as they spend more time together, you see the relationship is starting to have an impact on the older woman. She begins to live again, to reflect on her life and livelihood. Indeed, the young presence seems to be shaking the entire village out of the cobwebs they allowed to be developed.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Paul Allaer TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 21, 2012
Format: DVD
This the latest release in the on-going library of Film Movement, which puts out foreign and indie movie that otherwise would never get a chance for a US release. I recently subscribed to the monthly DVD release and got this a few days ago (and the movie is shown in a few art houses as well).

"Found Memories" (2011 release from Brazil; 97 min.) brings the story of "a city that time forgot", in this case a far away city in Brazil (some hours away from Rio), where we see one elderly woman (Madalena) go about her business: get up in the middle of the night, make bread, take it to the coffee shop where she has the same argument everyday with the coffee shop owner, go to church, have lunch, take care of the (closed) local semitary. Then one day, out of the blue a young woman named Rita (I'm guessing mid-20s) arrives and wants to stay a few days. Rita asks Madalena if she can stay at her house and Madalena reluctantly agrees. Eventually these two women form a bond.

That's pretty much it for the "story" line, but the non-story story line cannot capture the sense of the movie unless you've seen it. The camera is pretty much static, letting scenes develop, and what a grace that is, like watching a paiting come to life. At one point, Rita, sitting outside in the evening, exclaims "I've never heard so much silence", and how true that is. In the first half hour of the movie, I was wondering where this was going, but then afterwards I was getting transfixed more and more by the entire experience. What a movie! HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

The bonus short film on the DVD is also very much worth seeing. "Land of the Heroes" (2011 production from Belgium; 19 min.) is set in Saddam Hussein-era Iraq, and we watch young kids deal with bullying. Check it out as well!
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Jenski on June 11, 2012
Format: DVD
I saw this film over a week ago in the theater and am still thinking about it. I don't think I've ever watched a film that said so much by saying so little. The pace is languid, the cinematography beautiful (as my friend who saw the film with me said-it's like watching a Vermeer painting come to life)and the acting excellent. I don't even know if these people ARE actors, they seem so realistic as villagers living out their daily life in a forgotten Brazilian town. You witness people who have no hopes and dreams and expectations left, they are just living their life until their time runs out with no hope for anything different to happen or change-perhaps fully being able to experience life as it is, without any artifice. If ever a film will want you to take up bread making, this is it. The director did an amazing job of showing the beauty and contentment and comfort to be found in daily life, if you slow down enough to see it. Highly recommended.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By quentin on June 6, 2012
Format: DVD
Found Memories is my new obsession! I don't usually seek out highbrow art house movies but this film is simply fascinating. The deliberate pace coupled with striking visuals and brilliant cinematography adds to the beauty of the film.
Subtle and powerful, Found Memories brings you on a journey of discovery where all your preconceptions are challenged. Found Memories is not only a smart, poignant and moving film, it's an experience.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By K. Harris HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on June 27, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video
Without a doubt, I haven't seen a quieter movie than "Found Memories" in quite some time. This intriguing Brazilian film unfolds like a surreal dream, but it requires a certain patience for its payoff. As very little is explained, I found myself attempting to fill in the pieces of its rather enigmatic characters. While it's easy to accept everything in the movie at a surface level, I found almost supernatural undertones as the story unfolded. Perhaps I'm crazy, and that might be the case, but I read a lot into "Found Memories" whether director Julia Murat intended me to or not. The movie has a silent power and it was quite a while before I realized just how swept up in the film I was. And ultimately, I was surprised that this nearly wordless endeavor drew me so deeply into my own head!

The tale itself is rather simple and unremarkable. In the rural village of Jotuomba, life has settled into a very ordinary routine. We meet a stoic baker, Madalena, who bakes bread, lives in relative isolation, and spends her evening penning letters to a lost love. Every day, same thing. Even her interactions with the church and the local coffee shop owner follow a precise and unwavering pattern. One day, a young photographer shows up on her doorstep looking for a place to stay for a few days. Little more explanation is given and the ladies cohabitate in a rather disconnected manner. But as they spend more time together, you see the relationship is starting to have an impact on the older woman. She begins to live again, to reflect on her life and livelihood. Indeed, the young presence seems to be shaking the entire village out of the cobwebs they allowed to be developed.
Read more ›
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