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Foundations of Library and Information Science Paperback – August 1, 2004

ISBN-13: 978-1555705183 ISBN-10: 1555705189 Edition: 2nd

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 579 pages
  • Publisher: Neal-Schuman Publishers; 2nd edition (August 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1555705189
  • ISBN-13: 978-1555705183
  • Product Dimensions: 1.5 x 6.3 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #834,149 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

In ten substantial chapters, Rubin (Human Resource Management in Libraries: Theory and Practice, Professional Reading, LJ 9/15/91) surveys library and information science, noting its significant components and depicting its contexts. Unlike encyclopedias and dictionaries that comprise the bulk of the available resources dealing comprehensively with the field, this is an integrated treatment, essentially a textbook intended to be read and discussed by library school students and instructors. Like many textbooks, the prose is often dry, and the analysis is sometimes cursory. But Rubin concisely and clearly presents numerous lively topics for discussion?the question of librarianship as a profession, the differences among types of libraries, gender segregation across job types, censorship, etc.?throughout the work's examination of politics and policies, technology, information organization, ethics, and history. (Some topics, such as the Z39.50 standard, might have been more precisely described.) Texts for further reading are enumerated at the end of each chapter as well as in a selection appended to the main text. Additional appendixes include a variety of reprinted documents and lists of academic, print, and electronic resources pertaining to the field. Students and faculty in library and information studies programs will benefit from Rubin's extensive text.?Dean C. Rowan, Whittier P.L., CA
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Designed to explain today's information environment to students in library and information science and practitioners in the field, this book offers much of the same content and organizational structure as its previous edition, focusing again on the many social, political, intellectual, and economic factors affecting libraries. This edition does, however, contain new discussions on the impact of the Internet, competitive intelligence, filtering, homeland security issues, digital libraries, metadata, and the ever-evolving environment of libraries and library science education. Some of the changes facing libraries are also explored, among them scholarly publishing, diversity, preservation, and information literacy, to name a few. Content is clear, thorough, balanced, and highly readable. Practical information is made even more meaningful with figures, charts, tables, updated appendixes, and revised lists of selected readings. A superb resource that contributes greatly to its field. Sean Kinder
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

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Customer Reviews

It is a very good introduction to the subject and very readable.
C. Kent
It provides a great introduction to the study of information resources/library science and is a better read than many textbooks I have had to purchase.
Kindle Customer
This text book is so dry it literally puts me to sleep every time I try to read it.
Lauren Levitt

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

36 of 40 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 20, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is a nice primer for anyone considering a profession as a librarian. However, I bought it hoping for an introduction to the theory and design of taxonomies, thesauri, and controlled vocabularies. I was disappointed to find that the emphasis is on standards, ethics, the library as an institution, etc. The title is a bit misleading.
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By J. Walters on March 26, 2006
Format: Paperback
Wow. Someone called this book reader friendly. ::blink, blink:: I don't know about that. What I do know is that it is a tremendous resource for the LIS professional. Like probably every other MLIS/MLS student in America, I bought this book for one of my early courses. I read snippets. I skimmed mercilessly. I snored repeatedly, but I learned copiously. Buy it if you must. Borrow it if you have the chance. Don't skip it unless you have to.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By K. A. Mills on December 11, 2004
Format: Paperback
As with many MLS students, this was the required test for my introductory course. I was dreading it based on some of the reviews I read here. I expected to tolerate the material and then quickly sell my book after the semester. Sure, not all of the material is exciting, but let's be realistic: it's a textbook! Rubin does a fine job of covering the foundations of librarianship. This is not a book to read for practical, how-to information. It is a foundations book ... one that covers the history, values, ethics, and policies of the profession. It also has an interesting chapter on how the profession is evolving. I agree with a previous reviewer's comments that the graphics were uninspiring. On the whole, though, the text is a fine, introductory resource, and one that I'll keep through my MLS program as a reference.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on July 16, 2010
Format: Paperback
Now in an updated third edition, Foundations of Library and Information Science is an exhaustive, in-depth reference and resource for library and information science professionals. Updated to reflect the latest technological transformations in the field, Foundations of Library and Information Science covers archives and preservation management, human-computer interaction, information analysis and retrieval, information systems management, information policy, library and information services, records management, social computing, and more. A top-notch curriculum or self-study aid for anyone interested in any of a wide variety of information science professions, Foundations of Library and Information Science especially recommended for college library collections.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Ruth on September 9, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book gets mixed reviews from me, especially since this book cost more than $80 and was a required textbook.

Good content
Good layout
Nice paper
Tiny fonts (words)

I guess the publishers were trying to cut corners to save money but they are doing their readers a big disservice. Making the book small overall AND choosing 10 point type makes for a very difficult read for anyone over 40. Especially uncomfortable to read in dim light. I found this doubly frustrating considering the price of the book (no reflection on Amazon).

Excellent service from Amazon Prime - arrived in less than 48 hours from ordering!
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By "nbirtii" on June 29, 2004
Format: Paperback
Foundations of Library and Information Science was the assigned text for my first class in an MLS graduate program. The breadth of material covered is extensive. No textbook will ever hold one's interest like a novel, but this one came pretty close. I found myself reading late into the night to find out what the author had to reveal next. This book will definitely be on my shelf as a ready reference throughout my course of study.
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28 of 37 people found the following review helpful By CT on March 22, 2002
Format: Paperback
In the immortal words of Alec Baldwin in Beetlejuice, this book reads like stereo instructions. I have not yet picked it up to read it without falling asleep. Be warned if you get this title in a library science course. I actually had to track it down. It is one of the most boring, tedious texts I have ever tried to read. Even the graphics are dull and unimaginative. Textbooks don't have to be so stupifyingly boring as this. The book is very thorough, but you really have to work to stay with it. Run away, run away!!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Thomas H. Patterson on September 12, 2006
Format: Paperback
Rubin offers a competent and well prepared text that covers the field thoroughly. The book, however, is written in a manner that takes all of the interest, colour, and excitement out of librarianship. It is dull and it is boring big time, and it tends to put off those interested in becoming librarians. I know because I'm using it now in a course that I'm teaching. There is really no reason for this for producing such a flat, unappealing volume. I strongly urge Rubin to take on a co-author who would be able to put some life and human interest in this otherwise commendable work. He owes it to his profession.
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