Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.00
  • Save: $4.17 (26%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 15 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Four Corners: A Journey i... has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Negligible wear. We note every flaw we can find, and we are quite picky, so buy with confidence. 100% guaranteed.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Four Corners: A Journey into the Heart of Papua New Guinea Paperback – November 1, 2004

3.9 out of 5 stars 33 customer reviews

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.83
$6.49 $1.46

Top 20 lists in Books
Top 20 lists in Books
View the top 20 best sellers of all time, the most reviewed books of all time and some of our editors' favorite picks. Learn more
$11.83 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 15 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • Four Corners: A Journey into the Heart of Papua New Guinea
  • +
  • Monique and the Mango Rains: Two Years with a Midwife in Mali
Total price: $29.69
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Review

“It is, like all the best travel narratives, a resonant interior journey, and offers wisdom for our times.”
—Edward Marriott, author of The Lost Tribe

“Kira Salak is tough, a real life Lara Croft…unlike many travel writers, she is hip to her inner workings.”
New York Times

“Kira Salak is a rare find – a gifted storyteller who is also a daring journeywoman.”
—Mary Morris, author of Nothing To Declare: Memoir of a Woman Travelling Alone

--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From the Back Cover

"It is, like all the best travel narratives, a resonant interior journey, and offers wisdom for our times."
--Edward Marriott, author of The Lost Tribe

"Kira Salak is tough, a real life Lara Croft...unlike many travel writers, she is hip to her inner workings."
--New York Times

"Kira Salak is a rare find - a gifted storyteller who is also a daring journeywoman."
--Mary Morris, author of Nothing To Declare: Memoir of a Woman Travelling Alone

--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: National Geographic; Reprint edition (November 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0792274172
  • ISBN-13: 978-0792274179
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.9 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #191,507 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book COMPLETELY engaged me from beginning to end. It tells the story of a young woman drawn to danger and adventure in one of the most remote locations on earth. She reaches distant tribes that haven't seen any white people, where the kids all run off in terror, thinking she's yellow-haired ghost. She spends time with other tribes still practicing cannibalism, puts up with unsavory local traders, meets shamans and fanatical missionaries and all manner of colorful characters. This is an adventure book on two different levels--we not only learn about the fascinating country of New Guinea, but we learn what drove Ms. Salak to go on such a dangerous and remarkable journey. And more incredibly, she went on this journey ALONE. My hat goes off to her.

If you're looking for some dry, academic kind of book on New Guinea culture--like the previous reviewer seemed to be--then I suggest you go to the library and pick up some scientific journals and go nuts. But if you'd like a great, really readable adventure story that will hold your interest from beginning to end, that won't be a waste of your time or money, then this is the book for you. I've shared this gem with all of my friends--world backpackers and arm-chair travelers alike--and they all loved it.
Comment 28 of 33 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This book is well written, is an engaging story and discusses a very important topic--to this day, the atrocities happening against the Papuans by the Indonesian military represent one of the worst, albeit one of the least known, humanitarian outrages occurring in the world. Unfortunately, this book, although being passed off as a factual account of Ms. Salak's journey, plays very loosely with facts and is highly fictionalized.

I know this because I am one of the "characters" in this book. My father is "Doug Larsen", the villainous missionary portrayed in the chapter "Hungarian Delights". The description in this portion of the book is almost entirely fictitious. No, we didn't live in an air conditioned white mansion. Although our house was made of "Western" materials (lumber and corrugated iron) it was powered solely by 9 30 watt solar panels and could never have been air conditioned--even if it had had glass windows, which it didn't. The electricity was used primarily to run a freezer for vaccinations, and we had an emergency generator which we almost never used due to the difficulty and expense of getting fuel to such a remote spot. And of course the house wasn't white. Anyone who has been to the lowlands of PNG would know the futility of trying to paint a house white. Our "running water" was rain collection that was entirely hand pumped (yes, we pumped it ourselves). And we never had delicacies such as strawberries the entire time we were there--almost all the food we ate was local (actually quite good, but for the most part, the same thing the locals ate). Of course the idea that a SDA would spend Saturday morning at home eating brunch will make anyone laugh who is familiar with the religion.
Read more ›
3 Comments 10 of 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Being keen on New Guinea biota, I have been working to collect all the literature I can on the area. Most resources one finds are by missionaries, anthropologists, or military stories of World War II. Fairly useless for learning of the flora and fauna. Thus, seeing a book of a peregrination along hundreds of miles of lowland territory was intriguing.

Now, I'll concede there are no rules for writing a book about exotic adventures. However, I *did* have some preconceived expectations of travel writing about such an exotic destination.

I did not expect her to spend 1/10th of the book talking about how dangerous Africa is. I did not expect her to mention how dangerous PNG is on nearly every page, and manage to elaborate on it over and over with each mention. If she wants to cross PNG, sure, admit it can be a little dangerous. However, it gets old reading it page after page after page.

I really feel as though she could have packed twice as much information into the pages as she did. I felt as though I got to know few of the characters, and there was scant mention of the background settings. It was all about her, her thoughts, and how she is growing as a person. Now, this is all fine and dandy for some people, but I really wanted to read more about the characters she encountered, adventures she took. It was her book and she is allowed to write as she pleases. It just was NOT what I expected.

I especially find it incredible how she was able to cross the main landmass, and write so little about the flora and fauna she encountered. New Guinea is a mecca for wildlife, and you could write entire books on the subjects you find in 1 metre square. There is almost no mention of any plants or animals.

Despite my criticism, Ms.
Read more ›
Comment 38 of 48 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I have read both of Kira Salak's books and thoroughly enjoyed them. I am hoping she will write another one soon. Four Corners was great and I was able to compare much of my trip to hers (although mine was not quite as adventurous). I don't feel she spoke too much on the dangers of PNG, as one reviewer wrote. The dangers are very real and different than other countries. I also enjoyed the excerpt on her travels through Mozambique included in this book. She has a gift for writing. Hurry up Ms. Salak and write another book soon!
Comment 6 of 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Four Corners: A Journey into the Heart of Papua New Guinea
This item: Four Corners: A Journey into the Heart of Papua New Guinea
Price: $11.83
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com