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Four Famous Dandies Paper Dolls Paperback – August 1, 2010


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Paperback, August 1, 2010
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 16 pages
  • Publisher: Paper Studio Press; First edition (August 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1935223267
  • ISBN-13: 978-1935223269
  • Product Dimensions: 11.3 x 9.1 x 0.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,634,903 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

I recently fell in love with a delightful book called Four Famous Dandies, a colorful little amusement which spotlights the style of Beau Brummell, Oscar Wilde, Duke of Windsor and Patrick McDonald.

Created by illustrator Jim Howard for Paper Studio Press, it's actually a paper doll book! Most paper doll books feature women, but this one is quite rare not only because the paper dolls are male, but because one of the subjects is still living Patrick McDonald.

Known as The New York Dandy, Patrick is an unforgettable presence on the international fashion scene, but especially in New York where he s often seen at the best parties and fashion shows. He recently gained national notoriety with TV audiences, who enjoyed watching him battle it out with designer Roberto De Villacis on Bravo s Launch My Line.

Few people on earth have ever been as passionate about clothing as he, and he s proud to admit it. He recently told the Chronicle, What's wrong with vanity? We should present ourselves as best we can. I d rather wear a caftan and slippers than camouflage cargo shorts.

This book, with its colorful illustrations and whimsical subject matter, probably won't inspire any men to give up cargo shorts for caftans, but it is sure to become a fashionista collector's item! --Damion Matthews, San Francisco Luxury Living

If the proliferation of men's-wear blogs and dapper new clothing lines are any indication, the boys are beginning to preen again. But the real peacock of fashion has always been the dandy. Though Beau Brummell would get his cravat in a knot at the idea being the poster boy for male frippery he actually advocated a restrained, gentlemanly glamour he has become the poster boy for flamboyant dressing and a life devoted to aesthetics.

It is to this perception of Beau and Co. that a whimsical new book, Four Famous Dandies, pays tribute, albeit in paper-doll form.

The book features Beau and his brothers in scandal, Oscar Wilde and the Duke of Windsor, as well as the only present-day peacock to make the cut, the legendary king of the eyebrow, Patrick McDonald.

When asked if McDonald recalls the first time he heard the word dandy, he exclaimed, Oh, of course I remember! I was watching James Cagney in Yankee Doodle Dandy, and I just loved the theatrical clothes. The checks, plaids and stripes just stuck in my head. I was a kid at the time and thought, That's me!

Drawn by the old-school fashion illustrator Jim Howard, the book is a sartorial explosion of color, prints and swish. So how was it to illustrate these decadent dons? It was such fun to do the research! Howard said. Believe it or not, it was hard to find a variety of clothing options for Oscar since he really didn't dress in many different ways. But Patrick's variety of poses and looks nearly crashed my computer when I Googled him. Duh. --Cator Sparks, New York Times Style Magazine

If the proliferation of men's-wear blogs and dapper new clothing lines are any indication, the boys are beginning to preen again. But the real peacock of fashion has always been the dandy. Though Beau Brummell would get his cravat in a knot at the idea being the poster boy for male frippery he actually advocated a restrained, gentlemanly glamour he has become the poster boy for flamboyant dressing and a life devoted to aesthetics.

It is to this perception of Beau and Co. that a whimsical new book, Four Famous Dandies, pays tribute, albeit in paper-doll form.

The book features Beau and his brothers in scandal, Oscar Wilde and the Duke of Windsor, as well as the only present-day peacock to make the cut, the legendary king of the eyebrow, Patrick McDonald.

When asked if McDonald recalls the first time he heard the word dandy, he exclaimed, Oh, of course I remember! I was watching Ja --Cat --Cator Sparks, New York Times Style Magazine

If the proliferation of men's-wear blogs and dapper new clothing lines are any indication, the boys are beginning to preen again. But the real peacock of fashion has always been the dandy. Though Beau Brummell would get his cravat in a knot at the idea being the poster boy for male frippery he actually advocated a restrained, gentlemanly glamour he has become the poster boy for flamboyant dressing and a life devoted to aesthetics.

It is to this perception of Beau and Co. that a whimsical new book, Four Famous Dandies, pays tribute, albeit in paper-doll form.

The book features Beau and his brothers in scandal, Oscar Wilde and the Duke of Windsor, as well as the only present-day peacock to make the cut, the legendary king of the eyebrow, Patrick McDonald.

When asked if McDonald recalls the first time he heard the word dandy, he exclaimed, Oh, of course I remember! I was watching James Cagney in Yankee Doodle Dandy, and I just loved the theatrical clothes. The checks, plaids and stripes just stuck in my head. I was a kid at the time and thought, That's me!

Drawn by the old-school fashion illustrator Jim Howard, the book is a sartorial explosion of color, prints and swish. So how was it to illustrate these decadent dons? It was such fun to do the research! Howard said. Believe it or not, it was hard to find a variety of clothing options for Oscar since he really didn't dress in many different ways. But Patrick's variety of poses and looks nearly crashed my computer when I Googled him. Duh. --Cator Sparks, New York Times Style Magazine

About the Author

Jim Howard defined the art of fashion illustration during the '70s, '80s and '90s. His highly admired work graced the advertising campaigns of America s top department stores, cosmetic companies and advertising agencies. Instantly recognizable, Jim's style was realistic and yet totally expressionistic, too. Deep, dramatic shadows, meticulous rendering of fabrics, plus an amazing blend of freestyle sketching and careful attention to details made every one of his illustrations into a memorable piece of art.

Jim's list of freelance clients reads like a Who's Who of fashion retailers: Bonwit Teller, B. Altman, Marshall Field's, Garfinkel's, I. Magnin, Neiman Marcus, Dillards, Bon Marche and others. Now his work can be enjoyed by paper doll collectors with Bette Davis, Shirley Jones, Dorothy Lamour, Jim Howard's Fashion Illustration Paper Dolls, Ida Lupino and Gene Marshall Fashion Dolls. His newest series, COUTURE, celebrates high fashion decade by decade.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Avid reader on October 4, 2010
Verified Purchase
How marvelous to have such a book!

I do have criticisms, however, on the number of men featured, some colors of the clothing, and one glaring omission.

This book needed more dandies. Only four? Alas! The heart yearns for more! Where are Chesterfield, Baudelaire, and Barbey-d'Aurevilly?

First off, Brummell is shown in an ensemble of a mint-green coat and rose-colored trousers. Unthinkable! Brummell was known for his cut and severity of color. Sobriety was his credo. This paper doll "fantasy" of what Brummell might have worn is more in the spirit of the "butterfly dandy" of the 1830s.

This leads me to an egregious omission. Where is the Count d'Orsay? This much-misunderstood man is surrounded by so much conjecture in his many biographies. At least this paper doll book would have paid just tribute to his fashion sense. From the pastel colors of his youth to the sober darks of his mature years, a nice paper doll could have been had.

I only wished each man had an equal number of costumes. Brummell has two, Wilde has two, the Duke of Windsor has four, McDonald has...eight.

Nevertheless, bravo to Mr. McDonald. The dandy is charming anachronism, and it is nice to see one walks still among us--and appears to have a good deal of fun in the process.

That said, this book belongs in the collection of anyone interested in the history of men's clothing.
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