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Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food Paperback – May 31, 2011


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Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food + American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood + The Big Oyster: History on the Half Shell
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; Reprint edition (May 31, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780143119463
  • ISBN-13: 978-0143119463
  • ASIN: 014311946X
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.3 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #13,788 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Paul Greenberg is a writer with over 20 years of experience reporting on fish and ocean issues. His numerous opinion pieces, essays and articles on fishing and aquaculture have been published in The New York Times Opinion Page, The New York Times Magazine, GQ, The Boston Globe Sunday Ideas Section, and The New England Fisherman. His 2005 New York Times Magazine article on Chilean Sea Bass received the International Association of Culinary Professionals' "Bert Greene Award" for excellence in food writing. Four Fish is his first non-fiction book. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Paul Greenberg is the author of the New York Times bestseller Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food. Four Fish has been published throughout Europe and Asia and was picked by The New York Times, The New Yorker and Bon Appetit as a notable book of 2010. Greenberg has just completed his next work, American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood (Penguin Press, June, 2014) a book that explores why the United States, the country that controls more ocean than any nation on earth imports 90 percent of its seafood from abroad. Mr. Greenberg writes regularly for the New York Times Magazine, Book Review and Opinion Page and also contributes to National Geographic, Vogue, GQ, The Times of London, Süddeutschen Zeitung, and many other publications. He has lectured widely at institutions around the country including Harvard, Yale, Google, The United States Supreme Court and The Monterey Bay Aquarium. Over the last ten years he has been a W.K. Kellogg Foundation Food and Society Policy Fellow, New York's South Street Seaport Museum's Writer-in-Residence and a fellow with the Blue Ocean Institute. He is the recipient of a James Beard Award for Writing and Literature, and a Grantham Prize Award of Special Merit. In 2014 he began a three year Pew Fellowship in Marine Conservation during which he will write "The Omega Principle: The health of our hearts, the strength of our minds, and the survival of our oceans all in one little pill."

Twitter: @4fishgreenberg
Facebook: facebook.com/fourfish
Web: www.fourfish.org

Customer Reviews

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If you eat and/or catch fish you should read this book.
Dodge
That interest led to a lifetime of writing about fish and fisheries management, and the reasons for continued harvesting and overharvesting of wild fish.
D. S. Thurlow
Greenberg's book is full of great information presented in an interesting, very readable manner.
Elaine C. Erb

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Melina Watts on April 14, 2014
Format: Paperback
The ocean is the last frontier ...and like the Wild West, what the hunters are doing to the local biota is shocking and tragic.
This book is a great way to start exploring what is actually happening on the open seas are regards fishing. Think of clear-cutting and old growth forests.

The nice thing is, Paul Greenberg likes fishermen, likes fishing, likes the culture of fishing -- so in a miracle of great writing and clear headed analysis, he's able to delve into this subject and reveal the potential for incipient extinction without alienating the people who put food on the table both for their families and for the rest of us.

My take home? It will be a long time before I eat tuna again, if ever.

The bigger take home? We need to find a way to work together across national borders to protect numerous fish species from being eaten into extinction.

Good writing is the first step.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Michael J. Snyder on December 13, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was raised on the coast and over the years witnessed some truly scary changes, some species of once abundant fish virtually disappeared, coves filled in and changed the habitat of everything from oysters, blue crabs, quahogs, eels among other marine life. Their ecosystem was turned upside down in a very short period of time and many species disappeared. If you are interested in the marine environment, or want to know why farmed fish - especially salmon - are much different than those in their natural habitat. The world is changing, but many of those changes have serious consequences.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Brian Griffith on February 5, 2014
Format: Paperback
I love the way this guy talks. His childhood stories flow seamlessly into the story of all humanity in relation to sea creatures. The book's structure builds both forward in time and outward into ever-deeper water. I'd seen some deeply disturbing accounts about our systematic destruction of the sea. But this was a far more conversationally problem-solving approach, considering the merits of various practical experiments to manage fish better. I was fascinated to learn of bright spots, where people make some promising possibilities happen.

A lot of the book concerns learning what works, and what doesn't in sustainably farming fish. Greenberg shows, for example, that while farming of tra or tilapia shows enormous potential, attempts to farm carnivorous cod, tuna and probably even salmon, are moderately to totally counterproductive. In talking to the people actually trying these things, Greenberg has a learning adventure that's a pleasure to read.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Matthew Hosier on April 17, 2012
Format: Paperback
This is a beautifully written, provocative, illuminating investigation into our relationship with the sea. Greenberg builds the book around our use (or rather, misuse) of four iconic fish species: salmon, sea bass, cod and tuna. It reads like a novel, but is crammed with facts and figures - For example, we are currently harvesting a staggering 90 million tons of wild fish every year, but if we were to follow the UK governments recommendation and all eat two portions of fish every week this harvest would need to increase by 60 billion pounds.

Of course, fishing at even the current rate is unsustainable, and the result has been the crashing of stocks around the world. For the four species of Greenberg's book the response to demand outstripping supply has been ever more intense exploitation and the development of aquaculture - fish farming. Greenberg unpicks the problems with both approaches. The problem of overfishing is obvious, but fish farming doesn't fare much better. None of the four species under consideration is by nature a good candidate for domestication, and each of them present serious environmental and welfare problems. We are also left with the crazy situation where even salmon, highly selectively bred to be efficient growers, need to be fed three pounds of wild fish in order to produce one pound of salmon flesh for the table.

Greenberg's conclusion urges that fishing for wild fish should be done only by small-scale, highly environmentally aware local fisherman, and that fish farming needs to take a radically different approach to the one that has so far been popular. Rather than taking species with which we are already familiar, and trying to domesticate them, we should instead select species that are better candidates for domestication, and learn to eat them.
Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Robman62 on January 25, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am a fisheries biology major, and loved this book. Imagine my surprise when it was the only required reading for my first Fish class. I think that says it all.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Richard E. Thomas on December 26, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Three of the four fish "histories" were good - didn't much like the one on sea bass. Author goes round and round without saying much on this one, but the other three were good.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Michael Power on February 7, 2012
Format: Paperback
I can't get over how well this book is written. I read a lot and I've never come across anything of this genre thats this good. Its investigative journalism, personal narrative, and biography wrapped in a nature science book thats really an historical essay with sprinkles of business economics and a large dose of sportsman entertainment... specifically targeting the politics of our global fisheries of course. Uber informative and really an enjoyment to read.

Thanks!
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By Tami Franklin on July 7, 2014
Format: Paperback
pleased with book, but shipping takes long time
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