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FourEver Friends Paperback – March 1, 2009


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Nightengale Press (March 1, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 193344973X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1933449739
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,760,345 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

A decade or so ago, Erica Miner was a violinist with the Metropolitan Opera Company in New York City. When injuries from a car accident forced her to give up her professional musical career, she knew she needed another creative outlet and turned to her lifelong love of writing to fill the gap, studying screenwriting and novel writing in New York and Los Angeles. Her first screenplay, Hummingbird, won an award in the Writers Digest competition, and other scripts have been winners in the Santa Fe and WinFemme competitions. Erica's debut novel, Travels With My Lovers, won the Fiction Prize in the Direct from the Author Book Awards. In 2009, she published FourEver Friends, a coming-of-age novel set in the 1960s. Her suspense thriller, Murder In The Pit, based on her experiences at the Met Opera, was published in June of 2010, and has garnered five-star reviews across the board. Erica has written screenplays for all three of her published novels.

Erica's writings have appeared in Vision Magazine, WORD San Diego, Our City - Istanbul, and numerous E-zines, and she is currently writing opera articles and reviews for the well known website OperaPulse.com. Erica has appeared in dozens of interviews on radio and online. She lectures widely on writing and opera and is a top-rated lecturer for Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines.

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Very Merry Shakespeare on December 28, 2010
Format: Paperback
From the minute I began reading this book, I was taken back to a time period where my closest friends and I were: walking down the school hallways dreaming about all the wonderful things that would happen in our future (when we got out of the "stuffy" old school; gossiping in my best friend's bedroom in the middle of the night about the ONE's that we were madly in love with; and, the dark movie theater where we giggled about something that was way more important than the movie, upsetting all the people around us who actually wanted to hear the movie. This is that kind of fantastic novel that is so well-written that the sights, sounds, anxiety, and dreams of yesterday come to the forefront of your mind.

It is the 1960's, one of the most tumultuous times in history - especially for teenager's who thrive on angst. Jessica is a violinist and her best friend is Marguerite, a master at the cello. They met in a special school for gifted students and have been friends ever since. Now, Tamara and Jessica have been friends since they were ten years old, although they have grown apart recently because of how different their interests became - sort of like apples and oranges as they grew older - but they're still very close and care a great deal for one another. Rachel makes up the foursome; she's one of those outgoing, fun girls who just loves life and doesn't want to waste one moment of it. When they met Rachel, the group went from The Three Musketeers to the FourEver Friends.

The reader has an absolute ball watching the four girls as they struggle through everything from love and romance, to the politics and social prejudice that surround them every day. One of the most interesting storylines for me was Jessica and the "love of her life," Gunter.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Stuart Ellison on April 8, 2010
Format: Paperback
FourEver Friends is an engaging story of a quartet of high school girls coming of age in Detroit during the early 1960s. Jessica, Marg, Toma, and Rachel are middle-class teenagers whose musical and academic prowess serve as a backdrop for a gaggle of conflicting emotions and sexual intrigue.

Jessica, the principal member of the group, comes from a Jewish family whose liberal values are tested when she begins dating Gunter, a German-American boy nearly five years her senior. World War II is still fresh in America's collective memory, and anything or anyone German is viewed with suspicion by Americans generally and American Jews in particular. As a result, much of Jessica and Gunter's relationship is carried on surreptitiously.

Jessica, a talented violinist and vocalist, is a teen whose whose mind is a "steel trap" when it comes to music, but she's woefully ignorant about sex. Gunter, her first love, awakens feelings in Jessica that she never knew she had. Other complicated relationships follow.

Tastefully told with nary a four-letter word, FourEver friends follows the "Madrigal girls" through a series of triumphs, tragedies, rivalries, and romances. Author Erica Miner's semi-autobiographical account of growing up in the Midwest during the Camelot era will ring true for anyone who is, or has ever been, an angst-ridden teenager.
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Format: Paperback
FourEver friends is a book to love but also, in my personal and very biased opinion (I am a personal friend of Erica Miner), a book that troubles me. Jessica Rowe, the protagonist, is SO much like me that I want to alternately hug her and shake her. "Girl, for Godsake, there's a life right in front of you. Go forth and make some mistakes, stop treading lightly." Maybe that's what I yelled at myself. In a deep and disturbing way, I identify with this young woman's coming of age.

Jessica is a deeply cautious girl from a conservative and overprotective family. As she gets further into her teens (the book ends with her having turned 18), she alternately clings to needing her parents' approval, even while her need for independence grows. She's a bottomless chasm of raging hormones and sexual desire, reined in by a combination of an almost smothering morality and her career ambitions. She falls painfully in love with two young men: a German boy and a Polish-American. In fact, both boys are non-Jews, a stumbling block in a conservative Jewish family in Detroit in the early 1960s. I recall getting shredded by a friend of my family for dating a girl from a Greek Orthodox home. People in postwar American seem to have circled their ethnic and religious wagons, as though even casual contact with The Dreaded Outside would be a form of contamination akin to walking into a room when you have active smallpox or the Plague.

The book is a gracefully told variant on the classic Bildungsroman, viewed from the inside of Jessica Rowe's spirit, a spirit both shrinking from and reaching toward engagement with the passion in her soul. The passion comes close to consuming her body as well. She clearly desires sex even as it terrifies her.
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