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Framley Parsonage Paperback – June 24, 2007


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 568 pages
  • Publisher: Norilana Books (June 24, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1934169838
  • ISBN-13: 978-1934169834
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,155,021 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

''I wish Mr. Trollope would go on writing Framley Parsonage for ever. I don't see any reason why it should ever come to an end, and everyone I know is always dreading the last number.'' --Author Elizabeth Gaskell to George Smith, publisher of the Cornhill, March 1, 1860 --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

From the Publisher

15 1.5-hour cassettes --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

She wins over the heart of Lady Lufton and the reader.
C. M Mills
Trollope weaves a romantic story about mid-19th century England that captures the flavor of the times while he creates vivid portraits of its characters.
Alysha Nicholas
So are these books by Dickens, Disraeli, Thackary, Austen, the Bronte sisters, and, yes, my personal favorite, the great man himself, Anthony Trollope.
JAD

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

126 of 127 people found the following review helpful By JAD on February 17, 2004
Format: Paperback
If you shy away from Victorian novels because you had to read A TALE OF TWO CITIES in high school, it is time to give these treasures another try. Admit it, you are a bit older now. So are these books by Dickens, Disraeli, Thackary, Austen, the Bronte sisters, and, yes, my personal favorite, the great man himself, Anthony Trollope.

Why read something that was written a century and a half ago? Because Trollope knew more about the human psyche than Freud and Jung put together, and wrote about it not with a clinician's jaundiced eye, but with incredible tenderness and love. And entertainingly, to boot!

If you have been reading the Jan Karon novels about life in a small North Carolina highlands town, as it revolves around an Episcopal priest named Father Tim and his colorful parishioners, well!--this is where it all began. A book version of finding the source of the Nile.

Trollope began what Karon has revised and restyled so engagingly. Trollope invented the "church and town" novel, with what have become known as his Bartchester Series of novels, all centering around the doings of a fictitious cathedral town and its outlying countryside.

Not the first in the series, (it is the fourth but perhaps the best), FRAMLEY PARSONAGE traces the faith, home and political lives of a number of intertwining families. Here you will find love, ambition, political maneuvering, gambling debts, pretension, humility, envy, forgiveness, hate, romance. If it sounds like a slice of modern life-it is. We and the Victorians are so much alike; the human condition does not change.

In this delightful mix of clerical, political and romantic intrigue, you will meet everyone from the alarmingly meddlesome bishop's wife, Mrs.
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30 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Leonard L. Wilson on July 8, 1998
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Young clergyman Mark Robarts receives a choice parish, thanks to Lady Lufton, the mother of one of his university friends. However, Robarts, though newly and happily married, is not content to settle into the life of a country minister. Lured by a wealthy and worldly set of new acquaintances, he finds himself pushed into living beyond his means and, worse yet, being held legally responsible for another man's bad debts.
Meantime the young Lord Lufton has been smitten by the charms of Robarts' sister Lucy, much to the displeasure of his aristocratic mother. It take a great act of magnanimity on Lucy's part - helping the impoverished Crawley family during a crisis (the Crawleys are more prominent in "The Last Chronicle of Barset") - to finally convince Lady Lufton that Lucy is worthy of her son.
This beautifully written novel contrasts the simpler integrity, though sometimes snobbish values, of the old ways with the more meretriciously glamorous lives of a newer society. As usual, Trollope has produced a multitude of characters whose motives are completely credible, and his depiction of the different social groups provides a most vivid kaleidoscope of Victorian life and attitudes. As always, there is nothing outdated in Trollope's sure insight into human nature.
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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By James A. Means on June 30, 2006
Format: Paperback
As a sixty-two year old professor of English literature and a compulsive reader, I have read many, many novels in my life, and most of Trollope's (for they are, indeed, habit-forming), but this one is perhaps my favorite. I have not read it since 1982, but when I open the cover and look at the fly-leaf, I feel the special delight that I felt when I first read it. Like Austen's Emma, it is one of those perfect books you should not miss.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By David Cady VINE VOICE on April 29, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
About three-quarters of the way through "Framley Parsonage," the fourth in Anthony Trollope's remarkably entertaining Barchester Chronicles, two of the characters find themselves an unlikely couple, much to their surprise and mutual pleasure. And it suddenly occurred to me why I love this author's works as much as I do: it's the endless optimism. Yes, things always work out for the best in Austen and Dickens (for example), but in Trollope, when a character is caught off guard and overwhelmed by his/her emotions, so am I. The sense that unexpected, marvelous life changes are always a possibility, connects me to Trollope in a very strong way. Which is not to say that there's no edge to his writing, or no psychological complexity; far from it. In "Framley Parsonage," bad things happen to good people; but Trollope doesn't shy away from the idea that sometimes good people make bad choices...and must pay the consequences. In this way, Trollope's moral landscape seems to me more complex than Austen's and Dickens', less black and white. (Lizzie Eustace, the heroine of "The Eustace Diamonds" is a perfect example of this: she's an underhanded liar and thief, but we find ourselves rooting for her.)

Trollope introduces us to some new characters here, and brings back old ones, much to our delight; Mrs, Proudie is particularly welcome, in all her sanctimonious glory. If I have an objection to the plot of "Framley Parsonage," it's that the dilemma the lovers face too closely mirrors that of the ones in its immediate predecessor, "Doctor Thorne.". That said, my heart couldn't help but respond when the lovely Lucy Robarts suddenly found her dream of love coming true. I knew it was coming (even if she didn't), and yet the simplicity and honesty with which Trollope expressed her astonishment, disbelief and inexpressible joy brought tears to my eyes. Perhaps I'm just an old softie...but perhaps Trollope is just that good.
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