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Framley Parsonage Paperback – June 24, 2007

4.4 out of 5 stars 42 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

Convincingly argues that its narrative of "precarious livings and tenancy" displaces to Barsetshire topical concerns about land ownership and occupation in Ireland. Matthew Ingleby, The Times Literary Supplement --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From the Publisher

15 1.5-hour cassettes --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 568 pages
  • Publisher: Norilana Books (June 24, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1934169838
  • ISBN-13: 978-1934169834
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.3 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (42 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,769,109 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
If you shy away from Victorian novels because you had to read A TALE OF TWO CITIES in high school, it is time to give these treasures another try. Admit it, you are a bit older now. So are these books by Dickens, Disraeli, Thackary, Austen, the Bronte sisters, and, yes, my personal favorite, the great man himself, Anthony Trollope.

Why read something that was written a century and a half ago? Because Trollope knew more about the human psyche than Freud and Jung put together, and wrote about it not with a clinician's jaundiced eye, but with incredible tenderness and love. And entertainingly, to boot!

If you have been reading the Jan Karon novels about life in a small North Carolina highlands town, as it revolves around an Episcopal priest named Father Tim and his colorful parishioners, well!--this is where it all began. A book version of finding the source of the Nile.

Trollope began what Karon has revised and restyled so engagingly. Trollope invented the "church and town" novel, with what have become known as his Bartchester Series of novels, all centering around the doings of a fictitious cathedral town and its outlying countryside.

Not the first in the series, (it is the fourth but perhaps the best), FRAMLEY PARSONAGE traces the faith, home and political lives of a number of intertwining families. Here you will find love, ambition, political maneuvering, gambling debts, pretension, humility, envy, forgiveness, hate, romance. If it sounds like a slice of modern life-it is. We and the Victorians are so much alike; the human condition does not change.

In this delightful mix of clerical, political and romantic intrigue, you will meet everyone from the alarmingly meddlesome bishop's wife, Mrs.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Young clergyman Mark Robarts receives a choice parish, thanks to Lady Lufton, the mother of one of his university friends. However, Robarts, though newly and happily married, is not content to settle into the life of a country minister. Lured by a wealthy and worldly set of new acquaintances, he finds himself pushed into living beyond his means and, worse yet, being held legally responsible for another man's bad debts.
Meantime the young Lord Lufton has been smitten by the charms of Robarts' sister Lucy, much to the displeasure of his aristocratic mother. It take a great act of magnanimity on Lucy's part - helping the impoverished Crawley family during a crisis (the Crawleys are more prominent in "The Last Chronicle of Barset") - to finally convince Lady Lufton that Lucy is worthy of her son.
This beautifully written novel contrasts the simpler integrity, though sometimes snobbish values, of the old ways with the more meretriciously glamorous lives of a newer society. As usual, Trollope has produced a multitude of characters whose motives are completely credible, and his depiction of the different social groups provides a most vivid kaleidoscope of Victorian life and attitudes. As always, there is nothing outdated in Trollope's sure insight into human nature.
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Format: Paperback
As a sixty-two year old professor of English literature and a compulsive reader, I have read many, many novels in my life, and most of Trollope's (for they are, indeed, habit-forming), but this one is perhaps my favorite. I have not read it since 1982, but when I open the cover and look at the fly-leaf, I feel the special delight that I felt when I first read it. Like Austen's Emma, it is one of those perfect books you should not miss.
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Trollope's first serialized novel (in 16 monthly installments of 3 chapters each) was a great success. Though the publication, in 1860 onwards, was 'anonymous', there can have been little doubt about the author's identity, since three previous Barset novels had been well received in book form, and the cast is partly the same in this 4th volume.
Trollope had little trouble adjusting to the special process of writing for a magazine. Publishing the start of a book when the rest is not yet in the author's mind causes a special kind of challenge. He went into this adventure with a spirit of curiosity: what will I make happen next?

Our hero is a young clergyman in the fictional Barsetshire. We follow his career and his ambitions. He is the creature of the lady of the manor, who gave him the job (the 'living' in the strange system of the English church of the time). At times he likes to test his chains, to keep up his illusions of honor and freedom.
Due to a misjudged act of financial support for a shady politician cum swindler, he gets into financial trouble. The suspense driver is not if, but how he will be saved from doom. The man Mark Robarts is clearly not marked for doom. Much of the charm of the tale comes from watching the confidence artist spin his yarns.
The political struggles behind the plot are between Tories and Whigs, and between High Church and Low Church. Mr. Robarts has difficulties finding his way. This is the time of Lord Palmerston's rule, or rather of its end, despite the victory in the Crimean War and despite the success in suppressing the Indian 'mutiny'.

One of the differences between Trollope and his dominant rival Dickens was that T always wrote about the 'now', while D and others put their stories back in time by a decade or two, or more.
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