Qty:1
  • List Price: $7.95
  • Save: $0.79 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Frankenstein; Dracula; Dr... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Solid used copy with visible wear. FREE SHIPPING w/AMAZON PRIME!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Frankenstein; Dracula; Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (Signet Classics) Mass Market Paperback – December 1, 1978


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Library Binding
"Please retry"
$204.18
Paperback
"Please retry"
$18.98
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$7.16
$3.00 $0.01
$7.16 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

Frankenstein; Dracula; Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (Signet Classics) + The Tempest (Signet Classics)
Price for both: $11.86

Buy the selected items together
  • The Tempest (Signet Classics) $4.70

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Signet Classics
  • Mass Market Paperback: 736 pages
  • Publisher: Signet Classics (December 1, 1978)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451523636
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451523631
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 3.9 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #111,777 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Bram Stoker (1847-1912) was born in Ireland and attended Trinity College in Dublin. He joined the Irish Civil Service, then became involved in the theater. He wrote seventeen books.


Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) was born in Edinburgh. In the brief span of forty-four years, dogged by poor health, he made an enormous contribution to English literature with his novels, poetry, and essays. The son of upper-middle-class parents, he was the victim of lung trouble from birth, and spent a sheltered childhood surrounded by constant care. The balance of his life was taken up with his unremitting devotion to work, and a search for a cure to his illness that took him all over the world. His travel essays were publihsed widely, and his short fiction was gathered in many volumes. His first full-length work of fiction, Treasure Island, was published in 1883 and brought him great fame, which only increased with the publication of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886). He followed with the Scottish romances Kidnapped (1886) and The Master of Ballantrae (1889). In 1888 he set out with his family for the South Seas, traveling to the leper colony at Molokai, and finally settling in Samoa, where he died.
Stephen King, the world's bestselling novelist, was educated at the University of Maine at Orono. He lives with his wife, the novelist Tabitha King, and their children in Bangor, Maine.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
19
4 star
4
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 24 customer reviews
Like having the 3 stories in one book.
Camille Gallo
The closer is Robert Louis Stevenson's DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE, the shortest and, in my opinion, the easiest read of the three novels.
M. G Watson
LOVE the book, had three classic stories in one and an awesome introduction by one of the greatest write in horror.
Monique Yuzwak

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By M. G Watson TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 30, 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Back in 1992 I was forced to buy this little paperback for a class called Literature of Terror. The class turned out to be pretty lame, but the book remains with me to this day -- battered, dog-eared and beloved. Most college textbooks are nothing more than extortionately priced trash, but this one packs a three-punch combination: three of the Great horror novels of English literature in one binding.

For openers we get Bram Stoker's DRACULA, arguably one of the ten most famous books ever written. Despite being written in the epistolary style -- that is, as a series of letters penned by various characters in the books -- the novel is highly entertaining, especially the opening chapters, which are set in Transylvania and achieve a remarkable atmosphere of brooding intensity. We are so inundated with vampires nowadays -- the BLADE trilogy, the television shows BUFFY and ANGEL, the UNDERWORLD series, not to mention Anne Rice's seemingly endless parade of Lestat novels -- that it is sometimes difficult to remember that Stoker's book, while not the first vampire tale, singlehandedly invented the genre -- not only the immortal Dracula character, but most of the lore that surrounds vampires generally.

Next up is the book everybody knows about but nobody has read, Mary Shelly's FRANKENSTEIN, which if it had been called FRANKENSTEIN'S MONSTER would have spared everyone of that name a lot of suffering as children ("Frankenstein was the scientist, you bastards, not the frickin' monster!").
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By D. K. Atkinson on October 4, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
There is an introduction written by Stephen King but it adds some to the stories themselves as it places them within historical context. But if you are a first time reader of these stories be warned there are no footnotes, endnotes, or explanations of unfamiliar terms - so you could find yourself at a bit of a loss.

The book contains the third edition of "Frankenstein" originally published in 1831, I understand from other readings that Shelley made some changes in the text itself. The third, and last, edition includes the introduction she finally wrote for the novel.

For the experienced gothic reader or the novice willing to look up unfamiliar words, this book is a treasure as it has the three most famous and chilling gothic stories of the 19th century.

Enjoy them thoroughly and chillingly.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer TOP 500 REVIEWER on November 18, 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Frankenstein, Dracula, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde / 0-451-52363-6

The classic three foundational works of horror, and the inspiration for dozens if nor hundreds of movies, are packaged here together in an attractive tight package.

"Frankenstein" is something of a love-it-or-hate-it work and I will confess of falling on the more heretical side of that equation - there's a strong didactic feel to the work and Shelley comes off a little too hand-wringing and pearl-clutching for my taste. All well and good to create a monster who is turned evil by society, but the author really must trust the reader to understand this on their own, without little "this means, of course..." moralizing asides every five pages. However, if you can get past Shelley's distracting narrative lurches, the story itself is quite superb.

"Dracula", arguably *the* foundational vampire novel, is included here and shows off the diarist form of narration so popular at the time. ("Dear diary, you won't BELIEVE who just materialized in my room...") This is always an interesting tact for a horror novel because it can mean that the suspense is lost (if you're alive enough to write the diary entry, then where is the drama?) but Stoker bypasses this problem nicely - the race here is not to "stop the vampire" or "stay alive" but rather to hunt and destroy the vampire forever, before Mrs. Harker can be completely corrupted. The hunt is a superb one, although I am biased - Dracula is one of my favorite classics.

Last, but never least, is "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde". This short story is surprisingly short indeed, and it is a testament to how superbly the story is written that this short story has inspired so many movies and dramas. This is a wonderful addition to any collection and it is delightful that it is included here.

~ Ana Mardoll
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By justice4all72 on April 3, 2010
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The three most famous titles of horror are now available in a single mass market paperback! Frankenstein, Dracula, and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde are presented in full. The stories speak for themselves they are absolute classics and are great reads even today. This was perfect for the college student who would need one of these titles and hopefully encourage them to read the others! Pick this one up for great reading.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Steve Reina VINE VOICE on January 25, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is a great book.

It's nothing less than an inexpensively priced guided tour of horror with Stephen King as your host.

As much as the classics themselves I also enjoyed reading King's take on them. As America's modern successor to these authors King's perspective is helpful in appreciating the stories you're about to read.

And what he has to say is interesting for the ways in which it does and sometimes does not bear itself out:

As to Frankenstein, King observed that Mary Shelley would often depart from her story to offer philosophical speculations more akin to a dorm room than a horror story. For my part, though I respect King's opinion, I found her digressions to be helpful as part of the overall narrative. Though the public consciousness for its part seems focused on the more sensational aspects of the Frankenstein monster's appearance and demeanor, I think Shelley's speculations also have a legitimate role. I found some of her observations to be very prescient given modern developments in gene research.

As to Dracula, King basically said that the book used deliberative pacing to help establish mood. For me however the book kind of reminded me of what Charles Dickens may have been like had he written horror stories. I saw the pacing and detail as just means by which Stoker tried to establish credibility for what was a pretty incredible story. Where Stephen King was offput by Van Helsing's use of antiquated medical techniques, for me they kind of lent a certain mood and verite to the story. At his time, Van Helsing with all his brandy and deving rods was (believe it or not) at the forefront of medical science.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?