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Frankenstein Audio, Cassette – January 1, 1994


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Product Details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio; Abridged edition (1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 067151895X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671518950
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 4.7 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (735 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,856,928 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Sometimes I read a book after seeing the movie.
Miami Bob
The wild story is perfectly balanced by the writing done in the classical style of the times.
Mary E. Sibley
The monster denied a companion or of humanity returns to pick off Frankenstein's loved ones.
Bear

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

159 of 178 people found the following review helpful By Ian Fowler on December 31, 2004
Format: Paperback
Much like Bram Stoker's "Dracula", Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" is a story we all think we know, but really don't. Very few films have consciously attempted to follow the novel too closely (which shouldn't detract from the excellent James Whale/Boris Karloff film, or its masterpiece-sequel, "The Bride of Frankenstein). Thus, everything popular culture "knows" about "Frankenstein" does not originate from literature, but from films. This is a shame, in a way, because the novel itself is, if not the progenitor, an early vessel of so many archetypes found science fiction and horror.

The basic plot remained intact when transferred to other media. Swiss medical student Victor Frankenstein discovers the secret of life (which he never reveals, lest someone repeat the mistake). He then puts together a body, essentially a man, from various corpses. He then becomes horrified by the creature he has built, and abandons. The creature, suffering a great deal of neglect and abuse, still manages to get a thorough education, and learns of his lineage. After murdering Victor's younger brother, and framing the family maid, the creature tells his (admittedly) sad tale to his "father", and then demands a mate. Victor, in a panic, agrees, then thinks better of it at the last moment, destroying the new bride. In retaliation, the creature murders all of Victor's loved ones (including his wife), and leads Victor on a merry chase across the world.

Most probably know that Mary Shelley wrote this book in response to a challenge issued by Lord Byron, during a vacation at Lake Geneva. (Along with this story came John Polidori's "The Vampyre", the first English vampire novel.) Most probably also know that Shelley went on to write other works of imaginative gothic fiction.
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38 of 40 people found the following review helpful By MsE0 on February 21, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I got the free Kindle edition from the link on the page for the Norton Critical Edition of the 1818 text. Mary Shelley made many significant edits to the book for the 1831 edition. I assumed it was the same edition because the link was from the same page. I didn't realize it was different until I went to write my assigned essay and went online to search for page numbers for the passages I wanted to quote. Many of the quotes I wanted to use don't even appear in the original version. This is a very important distinction, and I wish it had been labeled correctly so I would not have had to waste so much time looking for online versions of the correct text in order to replace the quotes I could not use from the later version. This edition is fine if you just want to read the book, but if you're reading it for school, you have more than likely been assigned the 1818 version, which is very different. The Kindle edition is also lacking in any kind of Kindle formatting, making it a hassle to find locations in the book.
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89 of 103 people found the following review helpful By Gary F. Taylor HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 18, 2003
Format: Paperback
Modern readers must jump through a number of hoops to enjoy this legendary novel. Written between 1816 and 1818, this is very much a novel of its era, and both language and ideas about plot are quite different from those of today. That aside, and unlike such contemporaries as Jane Austen, author Mary Shelly has never been greatly admired for her literary style, which is often awkward. But perhaps the biggest hurdle is that of our own expectations: while it certainly sent icy chills down the spines of 19th Century readers, FRANKENSTEIN is not a horror novel per se.

While Mary Shelly might have been stylistically weak, her story was not. Nothing like it had been written before, and the concept of a student endowing life upon a humanoid creature cobbled together from charnel house parts was unexpectedly shocking to the reading public. But even more shocking were the ideas that Shelly brought to the story. Having created this thing in his own image, what--if anything--does the creator owe it? And in posing this question, Shelly very deliberately raises her novel to an even more complex level: this is not merely the conflict of man and his creation, but also a questioning of God and his responsibility toward his creation.

In some respects, the book is written like the famous philosophical "dialogues" of the ancient world: a counterpoint of questions and arguments that do battle for the reader's acceptance.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By CollegeSTudent on June 6, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am thoroughly impressed with this edition of Frankenstein. Not only does it include the 1818 edition of Frankenstein, it contains the original 1818 introduction by Percy Bysshe Shelley and the 1831 introduction by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley. This edition contains a very nice collection of critical essays. Many of the critical essays focus on feminist readings of Frankenstein, but other readings are represented as well (New Historicism, Intertextual Criticism, Media & Cultural Studies, etc.). This is a fine volume for students looking to delve a little deeper into Frankenstein and the imaginative forces behind it.
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