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Frankenstein Kindle Edition

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Length: 134 pages Word Wise: Enabled
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Fortune Smiles
2015 National Book Awards - Fiction Winner
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Editorial Reviews


Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is one of the masterpieces of nineteenth-century Gothicism. While stay-ing in the Swiss Alps in 1816 with her lover Percy Shelley, Lord Byron, and others, Mary, then eighteen, began to concoct the story of Dr. Victor Frankenstein and the monster he brings to life by electricity. Written in a time of great personal tragedy, it is a subversive and morbid story warning against the dehumanization of art and the corrupting influence of science. Packed with allusions and literary references, it is also one of the best thrillers ever written. Frankenstein; Or, the Modern Prometheus was an instant bestseller on publication in 1818. The prototype of the science fiction novel, it has spawned countless imitations and adaptations but retains its original power.
This Modern Library edition includes a new Introduction by Wendy Steiner, the chair of the English department at the University of Pennsylvania and author of The Scandal of Pleasure.

Mary Shelley was born Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin in 1797 in London. She eloped to France with Shelley, whom she married in 1816. After Frankenstein, she wrote several novels, including Valperga and Falkner, and edited editions of the poetry of Shelley, who had died in 1822. Mary Shelley died in London in 1851.

From the Trade Paperback edition. -- Review

From the Inside Flap

Introduction by Angela Carter

Product Details

  • File Size: 378 KB
  • Print Length: 134 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1453771778
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publication Date: May 17, 2012
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0084BN44Q
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #604 Free in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Free in Kindle Store)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Queen of Swords on September 12, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
"Frankenstein" the book is very different from the impressions of the story I'd gained from movie images. "Baron Von Frankenstein" is not a nobleman, nor a mature or near-elderly man. He's a very bright college student who gets obsessed with the idea of understanding the secret of the life force. There is no castle, no giant lab, no lightning storm. . . just a rented room in a student boarding house. In fact, Shelley's Frankenstein is adamant about sharing nothing about how he creates his monster, lest others share his sad fate.

The "monster" is the true hero of the book -- an ugly creature abandoned by his creator in the moment of his uncanny 'birth.' Although at first animal-like, he gradually grows into the sensibilities of a man, with an instinct to do good. But his sincere efforts to be good, and to win his way into community, are rebuffed at every turn, and these disappointments hurt him to the point of furious revenge.

Victor Frankenstein spends most of the book wallowing in guilt and depression, unable to either see the capacity for virtue in his creation or provide it with the means to have a peaceful existence. The monster, his twisted mirror, is a wretch battling desperately for companionship, love, knowledge, and justice.

This is definitely a novel written in another time. The story is revealed through the letters of an ambitious sea captain who stumbles into the final chapter of the larger story. Everything is related as memory, and there are far too many pages of Frankenstein moaning about his unhappiness. It's not an adventure story or a horror story or an action-adventure. Instead, it's a moral tale played out in fantastical circumstances, leaving the reader to judge who, in the end, is the true monster.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Clifford Teapes on June 27, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Forget ALL the movies ever made about this book. They all say a lot more about the trashy cultural milieu they were made in than they do about the actual point of Mary Shelly's story.
Forget EVERYTHING you already think you know about the story of Frankenstein.
Start over again. Read the book.
There's a message there, and not one single mention of lightning, electrodes, or the stolen bodies and brains of deceased criminals.
Just read it. Your admiration for Mary and Percy Shelly will go through the roof, and your admiration of Hollywood will go in the toilet... where it belongs.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 19, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Everyone has heard of Frankenstein's monster... or at least the Hollywood version, with green skin, boxy head and bolts in his neck.

But the original creature is quite different in Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein," which starts off rather slow but builds into a tragic, darkly hypnotic tale about tampering in God's domain, and the terrible consequences that come from it. Also: if you create a new creature out of dead body parts, don't disown him or he'll kill your family.

During a trip across the Arctic, a ship picks up a starved, half-frozen man named Victor Frankenstein. As he recovers, Frankenstein tells them his life story -- especially about how he became fascinated with science, and developed a process to reanimate dead tissue. Eventually he constructs a new creature out of dead body parts, and brings him to life.

But while the creature is intelligent and articulate, he's also hideously ugly. Horrified that he's not beautiful, Frankenstein flees... and has a nervous breakdown. Wimp.

But months later, the murder of his little brother brings Victor back to his home, where he figures out that the creature was involved. And to his horror, the creature now wants a mate. But the loathing between them -- caused by Frankenstein's disgust and the creature's increasing bitterness -- leads to even more tragedy...

"Frankenstein" is one of those rare novels that is almost beyond classification -- it's gothic horror, it's sci-fi, it's a tragedy about scientific ambition that goes where it shouldn't go. Mary Shelley was only eighteen years old when she began writing this book, but she interwove religion, science and a fiercely intelligent knowledge of human nature into it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Fábio de Salles on June 23, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Everybody knows the story - or do they? I didn't. I revelled in the journey young and optimistic bratt Frankenstein takes to his tormented end. Not only a true horror story, but also a tragic one in the destiny of the creature itself which only seeks beauty and love and is welcomed with dread, fear and anger. Poor us, silly and shallow Humans!!

Shelley is a bit boring at some places, and vivid, full of motion in others. I had to make some effort to start reading the book and got a bit bored in the begining, but the tales picks speed and emotion past the half and towards the end.

Funny thing about it, the men behavior didn't correspond to a nowadays attitude, more rude and short of speak. In the book, all men make verbous statement of love and loyalty and beauty almost all the time (that's the boring parts.) They feel... odd. It does not spoils the atmosphere but it makes for a bit of artificiality. Maybe it is me, Brazillian of twenty century, and not the Englishman (Switzerlander??) from that epoch.

I would read it again, no question. It is a good book and worth reading.
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