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Frankie Pickle and the Closet of Doom Hardcover – May 5, 2009


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Frankie Pickle and the Closet of Doom + Frankie Pickle and the Pine Run 3000 + Frankie Pickle and the Mathematical Menace
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 7 - 10 years
  • Grade Level: 2 - 5
  • Lexile Measure: 530L (What's this?)
  • Series: Frankie Pickle (Book 1)
  • Hardcover: 96 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers (May 5, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1416964843
  • ISBN-13: 978-1416964841
  • Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 5.6 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #766,101 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 2-4–Franklin Lorenzo Piccolini is a fourth grader with a big imagination and an alter ego named Frankie Pickle, an amalgam of pop-culture icons from Indiana Jones to Batman. His messy room spawns an adventure that ends when the filth is too much even for him. Wight matches a silly story to black-and-white cartoon graphics in a chapter-book format. Readers who have graduated from Dav Pilkey's Captain Underpants and Ricky Ricotta series (both Scholastic) will be charmed by this longer story.–Lisa Egly Lehmuller, St. Patrick's Catholic School, Charlotte, NC
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

About the Author

Eric Wight’s debut graphic novel, My Dead Girlfriend, was nominated for YALSA’s 2008 Great Graphic Novels for Teens list. His comicbook adaptation of Michael Chabon’s Pulitzer Prize–winning novel The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay helped garner the Eisner and Harvey awards for Best Anthology. He was also the ghost artist for Seth Cohen on the hit TV show The O.C.

More About the Author

Eric Wight is the author and illustrator of FRANKIE PICKLE, a new chapter book series published by Simon & Schuster. Prior to that, he was an animator for almost ten years for such companies as Walt Disney, Warner Bros., and Cartoon Network. Wight's comic book adaptation of the AMAZING ADVENTURES OF KAVALIER AND CLAY helped garner both the Harvey and Eisner Awards for Best Anthology, as well as the Russ Manning Award for Most Promising Newcomer, and his debut graphic novel MY DEAD GIRLFRIEND was listed among the 2008 Great Graphic Novels for Teens by YALSA. His artwork has also been prominently featured on such television series as THE O.C. and SIX FEET UNDER.

Customer Reviews

After she read the first she asked me to buy the rest!
danitrice
Wight's stories are a seamless melding of chapter book fiction and comic art, without the awkwardness of other hybrid titles.
GraphicNovelReporter.com
Frankie Pickle and the Closet of Doom is a real find - perfect book for that emergent/reluctant boy reader.
Jennifer Robinson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By E. R. Bird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on July 16, 2009
Format: Hardcover
In the past, it was easy to figure out what children's books fit where. Thirty-two pages that are 11 X 8 inches? Picture books. Thirty-two chapters of smallish print? Older middle-grade fiction. See? Piece o' cake. Then graphic novels had to come in and throw the whole system in the blender. At first it was easy to catalog them. You have comic book panels and speech balloons? In the new Graphic Novel section of the library you go. Then "Captain Underpants" came along and ruined everything. Wait . . you have speech balloons and long passages of text? Images and words mixing it up willy-nilly with nary a by-your-leave? Impossible! Inconceivable! But there it was. The result? Meet "Frankie Pickle and the Closet of Doom". The first in a series, Frankie's books are the natural successor to "Captain Underpants", stirring together pictures and words in a raucous melding that's bound to entrance reluctant readers, but still be enough fun to lure in hardcore comic book fans. Expertly penned with a wry sense of humor entirely its own, Frankie's a welcome addition to a difficult to define category.

It's the worst of all possible worlds. A beautiful day, video games to be played, and what does Franklin Lorenzo Piccolini (a.k.a. Frankie Pickle)'s mom tell him to do? Clean his room. Fortunately Frankie has a wild enough imagination to get him through anything. One gigantic robot fight later and his room isn't the least bit clean. In fact, it's worse! But instead of punishing him, Frankie's mom strikes a deal. He doesn't have to clean up his room, but whatever the consequences are, he'll have to deal with them himself.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer Robinson on June 28, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Frankie Pickle and the Closet of Doom is a real find - perfect book for that emergent/reluctant boy reader. It's a graphic novel / chapter book hybrid aimed at early readers - I'd recommend it for a slightly younger crowd than the Diary of a Wimpy Kid books by Jeff Kinney or the Dodger and Me series by Jordan Sonnenblick. The publisher's recommended age range, and I agree, is 7 to 10. Frankie Pickle and the Closet of Doom is fast-paced, funny, and kid friendly, with a nice merging of text chapters and comic sequences. This is one that all libraries should add to their arsenal.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Anna Lee Vincent on April 22, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I ordered this for my son who struggles with a messy room. He absolutely loved it!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Rachael Cardella on October 8, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Our eight year old LOVES these books. He was fully engaged and engrossed in them for a six hour long car ride. They totally held his interest. He did not even ask to use the iPad. I think that says a lot considering my son would usually prefer to play a game than read a book. We've read them to our 4 year old daughter and nephews (8 and 4), and the Frankie Pickle series has been a hit with all of them.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on September 20, 2012
Format: Paperback
My 10yo son is all about comic books or cartoons. There's only so much Captain Underpants and Diary of a Wimpy Kid I can take. I finally had to say no to just reading Calvin and Hobbes every night for reading time (And I love Calvin). Cue the complaining. All the chapter books I tried to tempt him with looked too daunting to him, but easier readers were too boring.

He got into Frankie Pickle immediately, loved it, and fought with his sister about who's turn it was to read out loud (My turn! No MINE!) (BTW: the 8yo sister loves the book too!)

What's even better -- it's a book that I love too. It's witty, dramatic, adventurous and whimsical. The parallels drawn between "real life" and Frankie's imagination are great.

Eric Wight, I could kiss you. Please write and draw a bajillion more -- we'll buy them ALL.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By B. Jung on June 12, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I nearly didn't get to review Eric Wight's Frankie Pickle and the Closet of Doom. When it arrived in the mail, my son, a voracious reader of both chapter books and comics, pounced on it, read it from cover to cover immediately and then refused to hand it over. He wanted to take it to school; he wanted to read it again; he wanted to have it on his shelf in his room. He kept relating parts of it, repeating bits of dialogue. And he put the next installment in the Frankie Pickle series--Frankie Pickle and the Pine Run 3000--on his Christmas list. (I do discourage Christmas lists in June, but he's unstoppable. He also expects Santa to produce a super sonic car and a mind-operated Wii controller, so a book not due out until February is the most realistc item on his list.)

Frankie Pickle and the Closet of Doom is a hybrid, part comic book, part chapter book. Frankie has one of those "active" imaginations, and when he finds himself playing the role of an Indiana Jones style adventurer or a city-protecting superhero--always accompanied by his sidekick, Argyle the Westie Terrier--his adventures are related in comic book form. When he's Frankie Piccolini, a regular kid dealing with a regular kid's problems (an obnoxiously sporty older sister, a needy baby sister, and a fantastically messy room) the story is related in chapter book prose.

The boy (or girl) who slips easily into daydream fantasies is classic material for children's literature, and similar techniques have been used in both film and literature. What's surprising here is how well the hybrid form works to relate the inner workings of Frankie's mind. Despite bouncing between comic s and prose, fantasy and reality, the story progresses seamlessly. The prose in the chapter book portions is punchy, comedic and fastmoving.
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