Franklin D. Roosevelt and American Foreign Policy, 1932-1... and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Franklin D. Roosevelt and American Foreign Policy, 1932-1945: With a New Afterword (Oxford Paperbacks) 2nd Edition

5 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0195097320
ISBN-10: 0195097327
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $1.46
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used
$28.00
Buy new
$35.70
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, May 25, 1995
"Please retry"
$35.70
$25.93 $9.14
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
More Buying Choices
24 New from $25.93 26 Used from $9.14
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Best Books of the Year So Far
Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2015's Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Frequently Bought Together

Franklin D. Roosevelt and American Foreign Policy, 1932-1945: With a New Afterword (Oxford Paperbacks) + Strategies of Containment: A Critical Appraisal of American National Security Policy during the Cold War
Price for both: $47.32

Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Review


"A dazzling narrative...elegant...history on the grandest scale, embracing a world-wide cast of characters and all the continents....All the heroes and villains of the day before yesterday are alive again in these pages--particularly Churchill, Stalin, DeGaulle, and Chiang."--New York Times Book Review


"A book that will become a landmark in its field, indispensable to scholars and critical to our understanding of American foreign policy."--The New Republic


About the Author

Robert Dallek is at University of California, Los Angeles (Emeritus).
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Oxford Paperbacks
  • Paperback: 688 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 2nd edition (May 25, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0195097327
  • ISBN-13: 978-0195097320
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 1.7 x 5.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #620,710 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Robert Dallek is the author of Nixon and Kissinger, a Pulitzer Prize finalist, and An Unfinished Life: John F. Kennedy, 1917-1963, among other books. His writing has appeared in the The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Atlantic, and Vanity Fair. He is an elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the Society of American Historians, for which he served as president in 2004-2005. He lives in Washington, D.C.

Customer Reviews

5 star
80%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
20%
1 star
0%
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Gregory Canellis on March 12, 2003
Format: Paperback
In one volume, Robert Dallek has attempted to counter the vast amount of printed material covering Franklin D. Roosevelt's domestic policies during the 1930's and 1940's. The result is a mammoth effort that sheds light on the enormous pressures Roosevelt faced both at home and abroad during the turbulent decades when the world struggled to emerge from the shambles of a Great Depression, and prepare itself for a global conflict. Dallek argues that most historians do not fully understand the nature of Roosevelt's foreign policy. Dallek also claims that researchers tend to focus on FDR's shortcomings without emphasizing the constraints with which he was forced to work. Dallek's main purpose is to highlight the continual dilemmas Roosevelt faced in an effort to always strive for balance and compromise between public opinion and foreign affairs. FDR realized the need to break the country away from isolationism and place it in the global arena, both economically and politically, while at the same time facing the growing threat from the Axis powers. Though Dallek is noted as a gifted narrator, it is Roosevelt's leadership style,criticized as somewhat unorthodox,and the many quandaries in which he prevailed that provides the strength of Dallek's book. Dallek chose a ridged chronological format, which he maintained throughout the book. The chronological methodology in essential to enable the reader to understand the patterns that emerged within Roosevelt's style of leadership. For instance, rather than try to sway public opinion as to why the United States should supply aid to its allies or begin preparing for war, Roosevelt instead would allow the events then taking shape in Europe and Asia to speak for themselves to convince the American public.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Mike B on January 15, 2006
Format: Paperback
An excellent account of U.S. foreign policy as waged by the Great Man Roosevelt. There are details in this book which are not found in others. Dallek is not regurgitating other writer's viewpoints. All points are lucidly explained - for instance Roosevelt's dealing's with Chaing Kai-shek and his cabinet member's - Cordell Hull, Sumner Welles...

The enormous opposition Roosevelt faced from isolationists is discussed at length. No one can doubt after reading this how short-sighted these people were in relation to the futuristic Roosevelt. Roosevelt was the rare politician who could project into the future. His vision was not just the short-term but the long view. In 1941 he triggered the second version of the United Nations during his meeting with Churchill off of Newfoundland. He was giving the world - like Nazi occupied Europe - an alternate and much more benevolent view.

The only omission I found was the Royal visit of the King and Queen of England to Washington and Hyde Park in the summer of 1939 - just prior to the outbreak of war. At the time this was another attempt by Roosevelt to bring Americans closer and more sympathetic to the building conflict in Europe.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Todd Carlsen on June 24, 2005
Format: Paperback
This encyclopedic, academic book won the Bancroft Prize and is the best single-volume book on Franklin Roosevelt's foreign policy. Roosevelt was a very clever leader. He understood the importance of public opinion and balanced American idealism with realistic pragmatism. This book covers FDR's foreign policy - his aims, means, and results. Some of the highlights include the fact that FDR had to govern in an isolationist nation, which forced FDR to tactfully manage public opinion to deftly lead America out of isolationism and confront Hitler. Dallek describes looking at his foreign policy as looking through a kaleidoscope. It appears to make no sense until you see the mechanism behind the scenes. Another highlight is his effort to bring meaning to the war with his Four Freedoms. The ingenious Lend-Lease plan gave aid to Britain in a way that the public could accept - although with heated debate. He likened it to lending a hose to a friend with a house fire. He proposed this at great political risk, since opposition was heated and an election was approaching. But he won his policy and it was a landmark moment. Some people suggest that FDR's foreign policy was uneven and confusing, but that was mainly FDR's obtaining his goals in light of the political winds.

For anyone interested in FDR's foreign policy I highly recommend this classic by Dallek, along with Conrad Black's masterpiece "Roosevelt: Champion of Freedom," Burns's "Soldier of Freedom," Langer's "The Challenge to Isolation," Greenfield's "America's Strategy in World War II," Kimball's "The Juggler" and Gerhard Weinberg's excellent "A World at Arms," which emphasizes the diplomatic and political aspects.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ahoj2you on May 5, 2015
Format: Kindle Edition
I agree with much of the criticism of this book. It does read like a hagiography of Franklin D. Roosevelt. Many will not share Dallek's highly "liberal" interpretation of Roosevelt as a great wartime leader (undoubtedly he was a great domestic leader). Roosevelt's seemingly boundless idealism blinded him to a number of realities during the war which led to additional suffering of millions. First was his sugar-coated understanding of the Soviet regime under Stalin. In this context, Lend Lease should never have been extended to the Soviets. Doing so almost certainly prolonged the war in the West (after Normandy, the Allies literally rand out of gas) and almost certainly was the decisive factor in the Soviets advancing as far West as they did and first into Eastern Europe. Then of course there was Roosevelt;'s ridiculous and moralistic "Unconditional Surrender," which arguably prolonged the war (with Germany at least) by up to a year. Due to this misguided policy - with which Churchill strongly disagreed - resistance groups in Germany had nowhere to turn and were easy prey for the Nazis. Then there was the obvious neglect to act on pretty clear (and early) intelligence concerning the occurrence of actual genocide (not yet termed Holocaust). If only the rail lines had been targeted for bombing instead of the city centers, countless lives could have been saved. This still remains to be explained. And of course then there was the decision to let de-Gaulle lead the march first into Paris, the disastrous Yalta Agreement. etc. etc. Dallek's book does a poor job of analyzing and explaining all of these. The book is still worth browsing for historical background and a chronological recounting of US wartime foreign policy, but should not be relied upon to explain the very controversial dimensions of Roosevelt's wartime policies.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Franklin D. Roosevelt and American Foreign Policy, 1932-1945: With a New Afterword (Oxford Paperbacks)
This item: Franklin D. Roosevelt and American Foreign Policy, 1932-1945: With a New Afterword (Oxford Paperbacks)
Price: $35.70
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: 1931 foreign affairs