Buy Used
$12.45
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by tickletext
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: First page is cut out.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Franklin: Writings (Library of America) Hardcover – September 1, 1987


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$8.97 $1.99
Paperback
"Please retry"

My Paris Dream by Kate Betts
My Paris Dream by Kate Betts
Check out the newest book by Kate Betts. Learn more | See related books
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Library of America (Book 37)
  • Hardcover: 1632 pages
  • Publisher: Library of America (September 1, 1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0940450291
  • ISBN-13: 978-0940450295
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 1.8 x 8.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #658,624 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

YA A collection of well-known Franklin writings as well as 57 newly attributed pieces, all arranged by period and place. High-school students of American history and literature will appreciate this comprehensive collection.
Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

The Library of America has produced a witty contribution to the celebration of its own fifth anniversary and the anniversary of the United States Constitution. Included are authoritative versions of Franklin's best-known writings (e.g., The Autobiography ), as well as 57 new attributions. Also included are all prefaces and maxims from the full run of Poor Richard's Almanack , plus a generous and prudent selection of other writings, both personal and public. The material is arranged by the eras of Franklin's long life. Lemay's erudite notes, an excellent index, and the volume's acid-free paper all attest to admirable publishing standards. For most libraries. Sally Linden, Wellesley Coll. Lib., Mass .
Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
100%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 7 customer reviews
I will be a regular customer.
Jonathan Taylor
Benjamin Franklin is one of the great icons of the American Founding.
Craig Matteson
The book is organized and presented in chronological order.
T. B. Vick

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

76 of 76 people found the following review helpful By R. B. Bernstein on August 4, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Many of Benjamin Franklin's biographers follow up their treatments of his life and work with an edited collection of his writings, as if to concede that he is his own best presenter. Any reader interested in Franklin should therefore set the biographies aside for a time and turn first to this superb Library of America compilation of Franklin's writings. Spanning his life from his early humorous writings (penned at the age of 16) to letters he wrote in the last year of his life (at 84), it is the single best, because most comprehensive, introduction to Franklin.
Carl Van Doren ended his classic biography of Franklin by describing him as "a harmonious human multitude." The phrase has become shorthand for those who try to encompass Franklin's activities as printer, journalist, polemicist, political thinker, writer, economist, demographer, scientist (or "natural philosopher" in the 18th-century phrase), lobbyist, diplomat, and sage. More recent Fra! nklin scholars, such as Esmond Wright and Robert Middlekauff, concede his complexity, but doubt the harmony holding together his various interests, activities, priorities, friendships, and hostilities; they also note that Franklin's genial exterior cloaked a massive and implacable egotism and an unsuspected capacity for strong and often bitter emotion.
All these facets of Franklin emerge from this superbly-edited volume. J. A. Leo Lemay, one of the nation's leading scholars of Franklin's life and work, has produced a volume fully worthy of Franklin and the Library of America series; it will be indispensable to all future students of Benjamin Franklin, of colonial and Revolutionary America, and of the foundations of American literature, science, politics, and government. -- Richard B.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
43 of 43 people found the following review helpful By T. B. Vick on March 30, 2001
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The Library of America should be commended for preserving the works of Benjamin Franklin. This is the finest compilation of Franklin's writings still in print.
The book is organized and presented in chronological order. The first section contains Franklin's writings between 1722-1726. This section contains the famous "Silence Dogood" works. The second section consists of writings between 1726-1757. This section contains the "Busy Body" pieces and the writings from the Philadelphia Gazette, amongst other works. The third section consists of writings which date between 1757-1775. The fourth section consists of writings between 1776-1785. The fifth section consists of writings between 1785-1790. And the final two sections are "Poor Richard's Almanack" and "The Autobiography."
Moreover, the sections contain personal letters between Franklin and other notable men such as David Hume, Lord Kames, John Pringle, Benjamin Rush, etc. Also, religious writings, philosophy, political writings and the like are present in this single volume. In fact, there is about 1500 pages of just Franklin's writings. Additionally, in the back of the book, there is a very detailed chronology of Franklin's life describing notable things which occurred between his birth and death.
This is a great text for those who are wanting a very detailed volume of Franklin's writings. However, it is also a great compilation for those who simply want to sit down and get a sample of the works of Franklin to find out what type of man he was, what he believed, what he taught, his sense of humor and the like.
This book has been one of the best investments that I have made in my collection of American Revolutionary (Founders) history. I highly recommend this work.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Patrick Gibbons on August 30, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This collection of Franklin's writing display his quick mind, mathematical gifts, great sense of humor, detachment in crisis, and the razor-sharp diplomatic mind which did more than supposed for the American cause (more so than than Adams and others thought). An American genius and a true seer of note. A book to be enjoyed again and again.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
Benjamin Franklin is one of the great icons of the American Founding. He is truly one of the essential men who built our nation and deserves every praise we can heap on him. When we see images of the founders, they are all shown as old men, not how old they were in 1776. Franklin was really a generation older than most of the firebrands who led the Revolution. He was seventy when he signed the Declaration of Independence (John Adams was 41, George Washington 44, and Thomas Jefferson 33 on July 4, 1776) and eighty-one when he signed our Constitution as a member of the delegation from Pennsylvania. He was an amazing man. He was a successful printer, inventor, philanthropist, revolutionary, diplomat, and all around student of the world.

This fine volume from the wonderful Library of America is a collection of this great man's writings. From early articles in his brother's newspaper, to the Preface and Maxims of the Poor Richard's Almanac, essays, speeches, letters, the FOUR parts of his autobiography, and much else. You will read about his inventing the two-part spectacles and see his own diagram of his bi-focals, his views on slavery, why paper money was needed to help enliven commerce and the dangers of too much of it, his views on religion, his speech before the Constitutional Convention of the dangers of paying representatives at Congress, and so much more that is fundamental to our founding and all of it is amazingly interesting.

This book is interesting to dip into and read just those portions that interest you, as well as reading its more than 1,500 pages front to back. It has great notes on the text that provide contextual and translation help as well as sources, a most interesting chronology of Franklin's long and productive life, and an index.

This certainly is a must have for your shelf on the history of America's Founding.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.