Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$0.94
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by brit-books-usa
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Simply Brit: We have dispatched from our UK warehouse books of good condition to over 1 million satisfied customers worldwide. We are committed to providing you with a reliable and efficient service at all times.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Fraud Hardcover – Import, 1992

3.7 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

See all 16 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, Import, 1992
$0.94

Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: CAPE.; 1st edition (1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0224033158
  • ISBN-13: 978-0224033152
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.5 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #14,607,505 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I shall go out on a limb and deem this the best Brookner I have read thus far. A good holiday read, for as with most Brookner, this is a demanding read, requiring time, dedication, and attention to her detailed prose. However, this book differs from most Brookner, as it slides between points of view, taking us effortlessly and seemlessly into the minds of three disparate main characters ~ Anna Durrant; the doctor; and Mrs Marsh. There are also other, supporting characters whom we are introduced to, all of whom provide enlightening peeks into Brookner's trademark 'circumscribed lives'. Anna Durrant, the heroine, is written almost as a parody of Brookner's well-educated, well-off, well-kept women who have devoted themselves to some desperate, hopeless cause or another. Anna is disatisfied, she realises how boring, how up-tight she appears to others, and this adds for a bit of ~ dare I say? ~ light relief. Mrs Marsh, the elderly curmudgeon Anna befriends despite herself and against the oppositions of Miss Marsh, is a wonderful outspoken, fully-fleshed, roundly-experienced individual ~ the perfect foil for the reticent, protected Anna. And the doctor who suffers a reluctant attraction to Anna's very slender charms is superbly characterised. The doctor has chosen another over Anna, a bright, active, shimmery, shallow sort of woman, an Anna-antithesis, and this becomes the catalyst for all sorts of inner turmoil and Brooknerian heartbreak. Take this one out to the terrace, pour yourself a lemonade, and settle into a satisfying, depthy read.
Comment 18 of 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
With this book, I have just discovered the wonderful talent of Anita Brookner (where have I been?). The book's idea is common and simple- growing old,being alone, missing out on life- and it is woven into a story that is worth reading every page. I found that I got to really know the characters and cared about them. I agree with a reviewer that writes about her "satiny prose". Can't wait to try her other books.
Comment 9 of 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on February 6, 2001
Format: Paperback
A book by Anita Brookner is always depressing. I can't read more than one at a time. But why read them at all? A friend asked me this question and after pondering it I thought: Because when you open a Brookner, you know what world you're in. It's a discreet world of well-educated, upper middle class people (mainly women) living in comfortable circumstances. Yes, they're also desperate and blighted people. Someone is usually dying but meanwhile sitting up in bed in a very perky peignoir. Once that elderly mother dies, though, things get much worse for the unmarried daughter or son left behind. "Fraud" follows all of Brookner's usual conventions yet it resolves itself strangely quickly, without a firm foundation, after an intriguing beginning suggesting a mystery. If you like Brookner, you'll like "Fraud."
Comment 9 of 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on June 21, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book is wonderful. Although the characters don't DO much, it's their inner world that counts.
Just when you think Anna is lost forever, she manages to find some inner resource to turn her life around. Hooray! And those that she leaves behind will have to face the honest truth about themselves, or risk living a wasted life.
The author is so very adept at exploring the differences of how we act, in order to be socially acceptable, and how we really feel--what we'd do if we didn't live in "polite society."
Comment 8 of 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I fully understand that Brookner is an acquired taste. I also know that she is "thin gruel" for most readers. And by this I am not saying that liking her is a way of making known one's superior taste or sophistication. No - it is just that she is a very particular kind of writer who will only appeal to readers who are taken with her microscopic form of examination and illumination. Slow. A bit repetitive. Full of description and introspection. Virtually no action.

That said I think that Fraud is among her best. It feels very autobiographical. And the empowering of the main character at the novel's end appears to be a statement of purpose and independence from the author herself. "This is who I am and I am going to stop apologizing for it and make the most of it." A bit forced perhaps. Unlikely to take hold perhaps. But authentic.

There is also a lot of truth here. In her own few interviews Brookner says that she is very lonely, has led a lonely life. And that she knows it is not seemly to talk about it. Well, she explores it fully in her painful fictions. "It doesn't always rhyme in the end," sings American songwriter Guy Clark. It surely doesn't in Brookner's novels. Even her most ardent admirers would hardly say that her books "sing." No, they putter along as do the lives of her characters always hoping that they will somehow wake up to a brighter day even if at some deep part of themselves they realize how unlikley bright sunshine is in gloomy old England as described in the very gloomy but amazingly exact fictions of Ms. Brookner.
Comment 4 of 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Today is bleak and wintery and I'm home alone, so it seemed like an appropriate setting to read an Anita Brookner novel. I first discovered Brookner years ago when I was living alone in a tiny flat. I was unemployed at the time and the days were long and empty. I could relate to her heroines who exist on the margins of society. Since then Brookner's books have held a perverse fascination for me, although I can't say I've ever actually enjoyed any of them. It's hard to enjoy reading about sad, lonely people with very limited horizons.

Fraud is no different from any of Brookner's other novels I've read. The main character, Anna Durrant, has devoted her life to caring for her ailing mother and she's at loss after her mother's death. Now in her early fifties, she's never worked or had a serious relationship and has few friends or interests. The few people she does know pity her or look on her with contempt. The book is set in the recent past, yet the characters belong in the nineteenth century. For example there is an understanding between Anna and the family doctor, Halliday, that at one time he seriously considered her as a marriage prospect, despite the fact that they've never spoken about anything beyond her mother's illness or been on a single date!

In true Brookner style Halliday is stolen away by a flashy younger woman who uses her feminine wiles to entrap him. That's the big problem I have with Brookner's books - women are divided into superficial bimbos who get the man and intelligent, plain women who lose out. There's a real puritanical hostility towards sex, and relationships between men and women are portrayed in a very simplistic way. Halliday realises too late that he has been led astray and that he is stuck in a miserable marriage.
Read more ›
Comment 2 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?