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42 of 44 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Reviews from seven-year-olds
The following reviews were written by four 7-year-olds in aclassroom book club I led. We studied reviews from Amazon.com beforethey wrote theirs to see how there can be many different opinions on one title:
Rachel says: This book is about a boy named Andrew Marcus and how he wants freckles. I think it is funny because when he gets sick and his mother sends him to...
Published on May 18, 2000

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32 of 41 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A curious freckle quest
Judy Blume's "Freckle Juice" is a short tale for young readers, with illustrations by Sonia O. Lisker. Blume tells the story of Andrew Marcus, a 2nd grade student who wishes he had freckles. Things get freaky when a classmate promises to sell him a "secret recipe for freckle juice."
Blume taps effectively into the culture of children's folk magic...
Published on December 15, 2001 by Michael J. Mazza


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42 of 44 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Reviews from seven-year-olds, May 18, 2000
By A Customer
The following reviews were written by four 7-year-olds in aclassroom book club I led. We studied reviews from Amazon.com beforethey wrote theirs to see how there can be many different opinions on one title:
Rachel says: This book is about a boy named Andrew Marcus and how he wants freckles. I think it is funny because when he gets sick and his mother sends him to bed, she gives him two spoonfuls of stuff that tasted like peppermint and he dreams that a monster makes him drink two quarts of freckle juice three times a day. I would recommend this book to a friend because it is funny.
David says: This book is about a boy named Andrew Marcus and how he want freckles. I like this book better than The One In The Middle Is The Green Kangaroo, also by Judy Blume, because it was more fun to read and I like the story better. I recommend a friend read this book.
Ashleigh says: This book is about Andrew wanting freckles like Nicky Lane. I think this book is very funny because I like drawing freckles on my face. I want everyone to have this book.
Annie says: Andrew Marcus wanted freckles like Nicky Lane. He put freckles on with a magic marker but his teacher, Miss Kelly, gave him soap and told him he was good without freckles. I don't encourage yo to buy this book with your money because it is not a good story. If you want to see what I mean, check it out at the library.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A lesson in the problems of being dissatisfied with your looks, July 22, 2006
This review is from: Freckle Juice (Hardcover)
Andrew is a young boy dissatisfied with his appearance. Specifically, he is jealous of Nicky because he has freckles, lots of freckles. Andrew thinks that his appearance would be perfect if only he had freckles like Nicky's and he will do anything to get them. Sharon is a devious girl in his class who acts like she knows everything. She is aware of Andrew's desire for freckles, so she offers to sell Andrew her secret formula for getting freckles.

Andrew pays Sharon and is given a recipe for a gross concoction containing among other things, ketchup, onions, vinegar and mustard. Andrew goes home, mixes the ingredients and then drinks it down fast. Shortly after that he gets so ill that he must stay home from school. He then discovers that he did not get a set of freckles, so in order to avoid embarrassment, he uses a marker to make some.

Everyone laughs, so his teacher lets him use her "magic freckle removing liquid." Once the class learns of Andrew's desire for freckles, Nicky then tells everyone that he wants to use the formula so that he can remove his freckles. His desire is to be free of freckles so that he can be more like the other children. At the end, Sharon is offering to sell Nicky her secret formula for removing freckles.

Andrew and Nicky are typical of children in that they think the features of others are better than their features so they have a desire to change. This story is a lesson in that reality of life, so it is a good one for children. A desire for change is sometimes good, but foolish when it is something that cannot be changed. Drastic attempts can lead to dire consequences and there will always be unscrupulous people who will offer you solutions that will not work and that may be dangerous.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This book is funny!, April 8, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Freckle Juice (Paperback)
This book is interesting because Nicky has freckles and Andrew wants them. He wants them so he doesn't have to take a bath or wash his neck. Andrew asks Sharon for the secret recipe for freckle juice. Read this story to find out what happens. I am in second grade, and I felt that it was interesting and funny. I would read this book again.
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32 of 41 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A curious freckle quest, December 15, 2001
This review is from: Freckle Juice (Paperback)
Judy Blume's "Freckle Juice" is a short tale for young readers, with illustrations by Sonia O. Lisker. Blume tells the story of Andrew Marcus, a 2nd grade student who wishes he had freckles. Things get freaky when a classmate promises to sell him a "secret recipe for freckle juice."
Blume taps effectively into the culture of children's folk magic and urban legend with this tale. I was a bit turned off, however, by Blume's portrayal of Andrew's shrewish, hysterical, overbearing mother. After finishing the book, I thought, "When this kid grows up, he's going to have some serious issues with women!" I also didn't like the fact that the "villain" of the story essentially lies, swindles, and violates classroom discipline and suffers no consequences. Still, "Freckle Juice" is a fun story with a memorable "gross-out" factor.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic Freckles, April 29, 2004
A Kid's Review
This review is from: Freckle Juice (Paperback)
Freckle Juice by Judy Blume is a fantastic book for everybody to read. It is about a boy named Andrew who really wants freckles like Nick. So Susan says she will give Andrew a recipe for getting freckles, which costs 50 cents. The recipe has a lot of nasty stuff like vinegar, onion juice, ketchup, and lemon juice etc. It is also disgusting at the same time. At the end of the book Andrew learns his lesson, which is don't believe everything will work. I hope you read this book.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars hahaha, August 2, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Freckle Juice (Paperback)
The first time I read this book, I was in Elementary, and had lots of freckles. I loved it. It was really funny when he drank the "freckle juice" and also when he wrote freckles on his face. I loved the end....well, read it yourself!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars LESSON WELL LEARNED AND HUMOR TO BOOT, August 26, 2006
This review is from: Freckle Juice (Paperback)
I enjoy books for the young ones that give them a good lesson on life and give them a chuckle or laugh while doing it. Be happy with the way you look, be satisfied with yourself and hidden in that message is one that well shows there are no free lunches in life. the 1971 edition I have has some very well done black and white drawings which are quite charming themselves. This is a great book to read to a class as it creates much discussion and allows the children to relate their own wishes and discuss them. This is one of those books that I hope does not go out of print as it has a timeless quality about it. Highly recommend.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A classic, August 20, 2004
By 
This review is from: Freckle Juice (Paperback)
I remember reading this when I was a kid and when I saw it on my seven year old's summer reading list, I had to buy it for him.

We have been reading the book together and we have BOTH been giggling over it. My son teases me because I have a lot of freckles -- he thought I drank some freckle juice! LOL!

Judy Blume's books are just as good as I remember them.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sweet And Very Funny..., March 15, 2001
By 
C. Cunningham "Cris Cunningham" (Long Island NY, United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Freckle Juice (Paperback)
See story summary above.
Wonderful story about a grade school boy who desperately wants to look like someone else, and in the end learns to love himself just the way he is. Wonderful way for children to learn respect and self-esteem.
Should be required reading for grades K-3.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars My 7 year old son howled with laughter, July 14, 2009
By 
Ravenskya "Princess of Horror" (WESTERVILLE, OH, United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Freckle Juice (Paperback)
Since his big brother had to do some summer reading - I ordered a few books for the little guy to keep up his skills. He read Superfudge a few months ago, so I charged him with reading Freckle Juice, all by himself. I told him that if he could answer 5 questions when he was done, that the last pudding pop was all his.

Never one to back down from a challenge when a pudding pop is on the line, the little guy sat down on the family room floor and started reading. As I made dinner I could hear him howling with laughter as he read.

He came running out and told me that "Andrew wanted freckles so he gave a nasty girl in his class 50 cents to buy a freckle juice formula. When he drank it he turned Green because it was so gross. Then he used a marker an put freckles all over himself, but his teacher gave him a secret formula to make them go away. I think it was just soap"

He got his pudding pop - and I even threw in a lifesaver since I was so impressed as his ability to remember fine details from the book (he could list ALL of the ingredients in the freckle juice and remembered the names of every character in the book).

Is there any great moral? In our house it's an important one - Don't blindly listen to some kid in your class. If he had read this before then we may not have suffered through the "Penny Incident" a few months ago.

This is just a cute little book that 2nd-3rd graders can easily read by themselves. There was only one word in the whole book that he needed help with.

Highly recommended for moving your kids out of the baby books and into "Chapter Books" as he likes to call them.
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Freckle Juice
Freckle Juice by Judy Blume (Hardcover - October 1, 1984)
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