Trade in your item
Get a $2.00
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Freddy Anniversary Collection (Freddy Books) Hardcover – October 9, 2002


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, October 9, 2002
$189.07 $11.26

100%20Children%27s%20Books%20to%20Read%20in%20a%20Lifetime


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Age Range: 9 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 4 - 7
  • Hardcover: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Overlook Press; First Edition edition (October 9, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1585673463
  • ISBN-13: 978-1585673469
  • Product Dimensions: 10.2 x 8.5 x 1.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #345,301 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The kickoff trio of books by Walter L. Brooks unite in one weighty volume, covered in a porcine pink dust jacket: The Freddy Anniversary Collection, illus. by Kurt Wiese. These first three books in the 26-book series published between 1927 and 1958 preserve Wiese's original line drawings throughout, which plays up the vintage look: Freddy Goes to Florida (originally published as To and Again); Freddy Goes to the North Pole (nee More To and Again); and Freddy the Detective. The embossed cover features insets of Wiese's original jacket art.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

About the Author

Walter R. Brooks was born in Rome, New York, on January 9, 1886, and died in Roxbury, New York, on August 17, 1958. Brooks attended the University of Rochester and, after graduation, worked for the American Red Cross and the Woodrow Wilson Foundation. He became associate editor of Outlook in 1928 and then a staff writer for several magazines, including The New Yorker. The short stories he wrote during this time were published in The Saturday Evening Post, The Atlantic Monthly, and Esquire. Brooks's short story "Ed Takes the Pledge" was the basis for the 1960s television series Mr. Ed, but his most lasting achievement is the Freddy the Pig series, which began in 1927 with To and Again (Freddy Goes to Florida). He subsequently wrote twenty-five more delightful books starring Freddy, "that charming ingenious pig" (The New York Times).

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
25
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 27 customer reviews
Interesting and fun - highest recommendation.
Michael Goldman
I fell in love with Freddy, Mrs. Wiggins the cow, Jinx the cat, Charles the rooster and the whole Bean Farm characters.
Born in a Library
If it were well printed, I'd more readily give the book as a gift.
A. Winslow

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Tim Naff on September 19, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Brooks wrote the Freddy series between 1927 and 1958. They combine superb character development, unbelievable educational content, and generally mesmerizing entertainment. They are appropriate for reading to children as young as five or six, and make excellent readers for children from nine to as old as early teens.

If you read Freddy to very young children, expect to leave out some slower-moving segments and provide lots of side explanations. The good news is that these books can make your kids WANT to know more about judges and juries, bond and bail, the electoral process, World War II, banking, newspaper publishing, geography, ... I could go on and on. The vocabulary-building value is also enormous: words like "constituents" and "torrid" are sprinkled in throughout.

If you look at the membership of the Friends of Freddy organization, you'll find it is predominantly male. I think that's because of the book titles, not the content. My second grade daughter looks forward to my reading Freddy every night. She has named toys after Brooks' characters. Brooks handles the characters and their relationships so deftly that literary experts have suggested that these works actually inspired Orwell's Animal Farm. Oh, and the president of the First Animal Republic was a female.

Before Overlook republished the entire series, some rarer titles were bringing as high as $200 each. That fact aside, this combination of the first three titles in a single volume is a terrific bargain. I would argue that Freddy Goes to Florida and Freddy the Detective are the two best books of the 26 book series anyway.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
26 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Beth on December 1, 2003
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The only thing I didn't like about this 3-book collection was the difficulty in finding a good stopping place after my voice needed a break from reading it aloud to my kids--they always begged for "just one more chapter!" No crude language or gross-out humor here, as is the norm for many contemporary books published for kids. Instead, you'll find a sweet cast of well-drawn characters such as Charles the Rooster, the cow sisters, Mr. and Mrs Webb (a spider couple), Jinx the cat, and of course the title character, Freddy, who really begins to come into his own in the second book. The books have a similar flavor and feel to the original Winnie-the-Pooh stories, and are enhanced by the simple but effective line drawings created by Kurt Weise.
Stylistically speaking, these early works in the series can have somewhat bumpy plots, but Mr. Brooks' charm and his gentle social commentary more than make up for this. After we finished this collection of stories, my kids wanted to hear more about Freddy and his pals.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By C. T. Kalm on February 11, 2009
Format: Hardcover
The Freddy stories are truly outstanding. They have stood the test of time and it is wonderful that they are available to a new generation of readers.

This book, however, has some grievous printing errors--many typos in individual words (which makes it a bit difficult for a young reader who is not skilled enough to decode into the correct word). Also, the first story has chapter numbering errors which make it very confusing. Chapter 7 appears three times, and chapter 21 is listed as chapter 10; thankfully the story text is correct. There is really no excuse for this sort of error. This is not a defect in an individual book--someone did not proof the galleys with any sort of care. It's annoying for adults and disappointing for kids to discover so many avoidable errors.

5 stars for the stories; 3 stars for the production value of the book itself.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By nukelady on December 14, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I must have been about 7 years old when I found my first Freddy book at the local library. After that first one, I found and read them all. Freddy, and especially Jinx the cat, made me laugh out loud. As an adult, I've often looked for- but never found- the Freddy books, and mentioned them to other readers but only received blank looks in return. It's wonderful to see that the Freddy books are reprinted and back in circulation. I plan to buy them all and give them to nieces and nephews and my cousins' grandchildren...after I've re-read them, of course. I'm sure that the 50 years between readings have not dimmed the books' luster.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Julie Lorigan on November 30, 2003
Format: Hardcover
It was fifty years ago when I read the Freddy series, and they have left an indelible impression on me. As a child, I read all of the Freddy books that were available to me and enjoyed them immensely. When reading the books, I became completely immersed in Freddy's world of adventure. I would recommend this series to any child and plan to purchase them for my grandchildren.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Michael Goldman on April 9, 2007
Format: Hardcover
My 5th grade boy couldn't seem to get as interested in reading as his older borther was at the same age. He disliked all of the many, many books we have from when his older brother was that age. His older brother liked conflict type books like Jacques' Redwall series where there always seemed to be some grand battle brewing between good and evil.

The younger one is much gentler and avoids conflict and dark books like the Harry Potter series. Finally, I found that he likes the same Freddy the Pig stories that I so tremendously enjoyed reading when I was his age. There is no fighting although there is adventure and a gentle page-turning plot of "what will come next". To my surprise I find these are much better than the more recent books intended for his age group so I guess he just has good taste.

I read them to him at bedtime and he reads them on his own at other times. The earlier stories are almost 80 years old but they don't seem at all dated. Each book has a main plot with lots of little sub-plots running though them just like an adult novel. Once you accept pigs, cats, mice, etc, talking and interacting with humans everything seems perfectly reasonable. Interesting and fun - highest recommendation.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?