Free-Range Chicken Gardens and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$15.24
Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.95
  • Save: $4.71 (24%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Free-Range Chicken Garden... has been added to your Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $2.00
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Free-Range Chicken Gardens: How to Create a Beautiful, Chicken-Friendly Yard Paperback – January 23, 2012


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$15.24
$3.99 $6.02
$15.24 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

Free-Range Chicken Gardens: How to Create a Beautiful, Chicken-Friendly Yard + Storey's Guide to Raising Chickens, 3rd Edition + Backyard Chickens for Beginners: Getting the Best Chickens, Choosing Coops, Feeding and Care, and Beating City Chicken Laws
Price for all three: $35.63

Buy the selected items together

If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $2.99 (Save 70%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.


Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Timber Press (January 23, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1604692375
  • ISBN-13: 978-1604692372
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 8 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (188 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #12,725 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Award-winning landscape designer Bloom states that the heart of this book has you look at your garden as a habitat for your flock. Chickens and gardens work together synergistically since chickens reduce weeds and pests, aerate the soil, produce fertilizing manure, and provide food. Bloom and Baldwin’s guide to these pets with benefits includes comprehensive information applicable to both small urban and large rural lots pertaining to landscape design, fencing and hardscape materials, chicken-friendly plants, garden and coop designs, and predators. Details on fence fastenings and coop kits, along with numerous illustrations, full-color photos, charts and tables, garden layouts, and useful tips (Cut Miscanthus plants in late winter and use the dried grass as bedding), offer a wealth of practical advice. Beyond that, this how-to presents an ecofriendly, holistic view of human-animal relationships while addressing self-sufficiency and food issues, core motivations for the burgeoning organic, homegrown movement. --Whitney Scott

Review

“Numerous illustrations, full-color photos, charts and tables, garden layouts, and useful tips … offer a wealth of practical advice.”
(Brigid Gaffikin Publishers Weekly)

“A comprehensive guide from mating to medicine that will particularly help beginners…Bloom makes a persuasive case.”
(Amy Stewart ReadingAllYearLong.com)

“This is one of the coolest books I have had the privilege of reviewing.”
(Genevieve Schmidt Plant Talk blog)

“A fun new book.”
(Kym Pokorny Spinning Alpaca Yarns.com)

“If you have a backyard flock or you’re thinking of getting one, I would highly recommend this book as part of your poultry library.”
(Genevieve Schmidt Garden Rant)

“Everything you want to know about gardening with chickens…is here."
(Genevieve Schmidt San Francisco Chronicle)

“Exquisitely produced and artfully photographed.”
(Willi Galloway San Francisco Chronicle)

"Exquisitely produced and artfully photographed."
(Dominique Browning Garden Rant)

“Everything you want to know about gardening with chickens…is here."
(The American Gardener)

“Bloom’s obvious enthusiasm for good design and for her birds will inspire both novice and experienced chicken owners to create a garden space for hens and humans to enjoy.”
(TheGardenCoop.com)

“Jessi Bloom’s new book is as lush and inspiring as the chicken paradise featured on the front.”
(TheGardenCoop.com)

"Jessi Bloom’s new book is as lush and inspiring as the chicken paradise featured on the front."
(American Gardener)

“Bloom’s obvious enthusiasm for good design and for her birds will inspire both novice and experienced chicken owners to create a garden space for hens and humans to enjoy.”
(The Oregonian)

“Solves the dilemma of having free-range chickens and a vegetable garden.”
(TillysNest.com)

“Well-written and would be a true asset to every chicken owner. This book has now become one of my favorite chicken books.”
(FloraDoraGardens.com)

“I can honestly refer to it as the Chicken Bible for Gardeners. With everything from coop design, dietary needs, to chicken personality explained, this book seems to leave nothing out.”
(HenCam.com)

“Dispenses good, commonsense advice.”
(GreenPreferred.com)

“Tackles the very fear that keeps so many from the enjoyment of raising their own backyard flock.”
(WhitePinesWhisper.com)

“I love this book. It has the two things I look for in any garden book: tons of solidly researched, well-written, detailed information and lots of big inspirational color photos.”
(Sunset Magazine)

"... a manifesto on the many ways to pamper your hens - with plants for foraging and shelter, rain-fed water bowls and eco-friendly lawns."
(American Gardener)

"Bloom's obvious enthusiasm for creative design and for her birds will inspire both novice and experienced chicken owners to create a garden space that hens and humans can inhabit harmoniously."
(American Gardener)

Bloom's obvious enthusiasm for creative design and for her birds will inspire both novice and experienced chicken owners to create a garden space that hens and humans can inhabit harmoniously.
(Small Town Living.com)

“Complete with gorgeous photos, diagrams, plans, and a very well written and easy to understand approach, you will want to get your hands upon this book if you have ever dreamed of incorporating chickens into your lifestyle.”
(Sustainable Eats.com)

“Jessi’s approach is unique in that she’s a landscape designer and a chicken owner.”
(Diggin Food.com)

“I’ve had chickens for four years and I wish that I could have had Jessi Bloom’s new book in the beginning.”
(NW Edible)

“Provides a good overview on coop building styles and considerations, very basic chicken care info, do-grow/don’t-grow plant lists for the chicken garden and lots and lots of gorgeous inspirational pictures.”
(Living Homegrown.com)

“The only book I have seen that tells you exactly how you can have your chickens AND your garden too.”
(Horticulture Magazine)

“A great basic guide for first-time chicken owners and chicken owner wannabes.”
(New York Times Book Review)

If your garden fantasies involve chickens, Jessi Bloom, author of FREE-RANGE CHICKEN GARDENS: How to Create a Beautiful, Chicken-Friendly Yard (Timber Press, paper, $19.95), is here to make those dreams come true. Chickens bring out interesting characters. My new heroine is Elizabeth Zumwalt, a chicken whisperer, educator and entrepreneur who blogs about her family’s Bantam hens, sells eggs and gives half the proceeds to charity. She pulls a red wagon, topped with a chicken house, when she heads out to educate people about her birds. Elizabeth is 9 years old.

By the time you’re done with Bloom’s clever book, you’ll know almost as much about chickens as Elizabeth does. And maybe more about what chickens like than what your children do. You’ll be looking for bug logs and creating dust baths. You’ll know that chickens like to have mirrors hanging in their gardens — but take care with the angle, since they have eyes on the sides of their heads. There is no end to the vanity of a chicken.

“Experienced free-ranging chickens” — now that’s a real sign of the times; do chickens no longer have a tribal memory of roaming? — will know not to eat toxic berries, but Bloom is an expert guide for the untutored. Somehow, I’m sure that chickens prefer heirloom vegetables to any other variety. And while your flock may break free to cross the road, you’ll be relieved to learn that (unless they have an unfortunate encounter with a car) they’ll probably be no worse for the wear. Chickens don’t sweat.

Bloom genially celebrates geodesic domes and shingled coops with stone chimneys and even clean-lined modernist coops. She also writes about “naughty” chickens: “Chickens are social and hormonal creatures, and when we have them living in ways that are different from how they would live naturally, they are prone to behaviors that can be damaging to themselves or that are simply normal but just catch us off guard.” You might have thought she was talking about teenagers, but I now see that they’re easier to raise than chickens. I’m thinking . . . roast chicken with that rosemary?

(Backyard Poultry Magazine)

"Exactly what we’ve been waiting for—the definitive guide to letting our chickens roam freely without incurring damage to our vegetable or flower gardens."
(Backyard Poultry Magazine)

"Exactly what we’ve been waiting for—the definitive guide to letting our chickens roam freely without incurring damage to our vegetable or flower gardens."
(Natural Home and Garden)

"Essential guide that will bring your dream home to roost."

(The Republican Journal)

"This well-thought-out and thoroughly comprehensive new book covers the topic so efficiently and completely that it is bound to become the gardener's go -to reference when chickens are the focus."


More About the Author

Jessi Bloom is an award-winning landscape designer based in the Seattle area, whose work emphasizes ecological systems, permaculture, sustainability, and self-sufficiency. She is a certified professional horticulturalist and certified arborist, as well as a long-time chicken owner with a free-ranging flock in her home garden.

Owner of design-build firm N.W. Bloom -- EcoLogical Landscapes, Jessi has been praised as an innovator in sustainable landscape design. Recognition for her work includes awards from the Washington State Department of Ecology, American Horticultural Society, Pacific Horticulture magazine, Sunset, 425 magazine, Washington State Nursery and Landscape Association, Washington Association of Landscape Professionals, and the Northwest Flower and Garden Show, including gold medals and the People's Choice award.

Jessi is currently working on her second book with Timber Press: Practical Permaculture Design. Look for that release in late 2014!



Related Media


Customer Reviews

Great book on chickens and gardening.
nurseychic
For those that want to try and have chickens really good book worth buying on kindle, maybe have hardcopy later.
Amazon Customer
This book is full of good information as well as photos.
Eileen Sandell

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

178 of 185 people found the following review helpful By Orion on April 22, 2012
Format: Paperback
Free-Range Chicken Gardens has stunning illustrations that are worth the price of the book, but the text is nearly useless for homesteaders. The author's focus is on mixing chickens with ornamental gardens, and her brief forays into discussing chickens and vegetables leave a lot to be desired. Mostly, she just tells you to fence your flock out of the vegetable garden when there are seedlings or ripening fruit present (which is most of the time if you have an intensive garden of edibles.) She mentions not giving tomatoes and other edibles as treats to your flock if you don't want the chickens to learn to eat these goodies off the vine --- I can tell you from experience that chickens never given tomatoes as treats *still* find the garden tomatoes in short order if let out of their pastures.

It's also a bit tough to tell which of the plants the author says work well with chickens are ones she's actually tried. In several places, it sounds like she's just repeating conventional wisdom, and from my own chicken experiments, I've discovered that conventional wisdom is often wrong. I would have found it much more helpful if the author had made a point of distinguishing between facts she was reporting from personal experience and those she'd just read.

The useful side of the book is the way it considers the garden as an entire ecosystem. She does a good job of telling you which permaculture layers work well with chickens (the tall ones) and which don't (shallow-rooted shrubs, annuals, and herbaceous perennials in the spring). And, as I said before, the photos are beautiful if you want a coffee table book.
6 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
118 of 121 people found the following review helpful By JMS66 on January 31, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book combines two of my favorite things: Chickens and Gardening...with numerous photos to drool over! And excellent information and tips!
Is it Spring yet??? I can't wait to get out there!
I have always been an avid gardener, and the decision to keep a few hens in my yard was a natural extension of that. New to chicken-keeping, with a small flock of 5 laying hens (now 7 months old) in a small suburban, almost urban, backyard, I have quickly become quite passionate about my new hobby! Even though I probably can't let my girls free-range the yard completely, this book has given me many ideas for chicken-friendly plantings and ways to better incorporate my coop and run into my property.
The author lists plants, shrubs and groundcovers that can be grown for food/forage, as well as chicken-resistant plants that can add color to the garden, but are not likely to be eaten or trampled by your hens. This information alone is worth the price of the book. I've not seen a more comprehensive listing elsewhere, and the internet forums are filled with conflicting data/opinions as to which plants are edible or toxic.
I'll also be re-seeding my "lawn" areas with what the author calls eco-turf, an ecological seed mix containing clover, that will provide excellent forage for my girls.
The color photos throughout the book are so lovely that I know I'll be keeping this book close at hand for the remainder of the winter, as I plan and dream about creating my own, beautiful chicken garden this spring!
9 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
118 of 123 people found the following review helpful By Chandler #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 15, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I love to look through decorating books and magazines, gardening books and magazines, chicken books (yeah, I've even read a few chicken magazines too--for reals) and I tend to feel them "worth it" when I take away a few ideas. I expected the same from this having felt it a novel idea to have a beautiful chicken-friendly yard (seeing as how I'm nothing short of a chicken activist I'm so chicken friendly) I was wowed. I came away with SO much more than a few ideas.

This is not about simply making a yard friendly for hens. This is about having a gorgeous yard, with plants hens don't eat (and many they can!) that give your yard beauty and them shelter, having a yard that is stunning with beautiful coops, having a yard that is charming rather than barren...

This is not one family's ideas of how to combine free-range chickens, natural fertilizer, organic pest control, soil aeration, fresh eggs if ya want those too, and thriving gardens...this is actually pages and pages of photos and ideas of many homes, yards, and gardens that are easy to recreate and are truly a uptopia for both owner and the winged who share it. (And by "free range" I do not mean no coop. That would be cruel and the hens would likely not live a week. Night predators such as raccoons etc are no match for a sleeping hen and hens know this so at dusk each night they put themselves to bed in your coop and wait for you to lock the door. And they hate rain. Whether part-time free-range and safely tucked away at night, or free-range inside a pretty run full-time, this still means daytime only of course)

It's not easy to have a yard you want to wander through in beauty and hens who love to nibble sharing it. My side yard proves it.
Read more ›
7 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
51 of 55 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer L. Myers on February 20, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book has pretty pictures; that is the book's only positive trait. The book has numerous flaws, which have been covered by other reviewers. However, other reviewers haven't discussed the problem I had with this book: a severe lack of focus.

Instead of focusing on the book's supposed subject--"How to Create a Beautiful Chicken-Friendly Yard"-- the author apparently decided she would rather superficially talk about many, MANY other topics. They include:

1. Coop design (lots of pretty pictures, only one "how to do this" plan with measurements)
2. Predator descriptions and deterrent methods (Mostly accurate info, but why is this discussed in a garden design book?)
3. How to pick chicken breeds (In every basic chicken keeping book in the world--why waste valuable space in this supposedly specialized book with a rehash of that same information??)
4. How to clip a chicken's wings, etc. (What does this have to do with garden design? The author may have her reasons, but doesn't explain them.)
5. A brief rundown of other poultry types, including turkeys, geese, and ducks. (Huh?? Why are ducks discussed in a book that is supposed to be about chickens??)
6. She wraps up the book by listing common chicken diseases and parasites. (?!?)

I have had my chickens for almost 2 years and own many basic chicken keeping books; I didn't need another one. What I DID need was tips on how to incorporate my chickens into a garden--what plants to avoid, what plants they'd love, what plants would benefit from the extra nitrogen from chicken poop. Unfortunately, there is very little information of this sort included in the book, and what little there is is VERY difficult to find, even if using the index.
Read more ›
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews