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Freedom, Anarchy, and the Law: An Introduction to Political Philosophy Paperback – February 1, 1982


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Prometheus Books; 2nd edition (February 1, 1982)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0879751762
  • ISBN-13: 978-0879751760
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.4 x 8.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.3 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,070,071 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Richard Taylor (Interlaken, NY) has held professorships in philosophy at Brown University, the graduate faculty of Columbia University, and the University of Rochester. He is the author of Restoring Pride; Love Affairs: Marriage & Infidelity; and Freedom, Anarchy, and the Law.

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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Benjamin Booth on January 9, 2002
Format: Paperback
Concise, allegorical and amazingly lucent in its breakdown of how mankind should logically apply self-interest to the formation of building blocks for the Rule of Law.
An excellent handbook for philosophers, law-makers, and anyone who wants to understand better what might be good and bad about the current forms of law in the world today.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Gilbert De Bruycker on November 17, 2013
Format: Paperback
A man might be free with respect to some actions and quite unfree with respect to others. No man on earth has ever been totally free with respect to everything; but on the other hand, probably none has ever been in total bondage either.

There is a realm of actions which nothing at all hinders or prevents us from doing, another which we are hindered but not totally prevented from doing, and a third which we are absolutely prevented from doing at all.

ALL human freedom is the freedom of some kind of jail, be it a large one or a small one. The DEGREE of a man's freedom is simply the scope of the first of these realms in relation to the second and third.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 17, 2002
Format: Paperback
Taylor does an amazing job introducing people to Political Philosophy. It should be a book everyone interested in political philosophy or philosophy in general should read.
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