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Freedom Challenge: African American Homeschoolers
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
on March 19, 1999
I checked out and read several books on homeschooling before making the decision for my son. The variety in teaching styles and methods used and the results, all good, convinced me even more that I needed to do this for my child. He is a very good reader and excellent speller for his age, however, he struggles in math. Even with that knowledge, his teachers were willing to push him along without even the offer of any additional help for him. Because I didn't want him to be lost in the system, I pulled him out. Because of the courage of the parents in this book, I knew I could do it too. My son is nearly to the place where he should be in math and it's because he had the full attention of someone who cared enough to make sure he was not pushed along and that he actually learns.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
on July 28, 2002
Education has been a primary concern for African-Americans throughout their history. At one time they were denied schooling, then had to accept segregated schooling and are now left with public schools that are failing. If you are an African-American parent concerned about your child's future, homeschooling may be a viable alternative.
Freedom Challenge is a compilation of interviews of parents and their children who have chosen home schooling and achieved remarkable results. The parents give the reasons why they chose this alternative after having gone through negative results in the public and private school sectors. These individuals share a diverse background of education and vocation. At some point in time they discovered that the schools were failing them and decided to do something about it. The young adults, teenagers and younger children share their experiences in going through home and public schooling. Their sensitive insight and enjoyment of their present schooling affirms the need for such an education that empowers them and their parents.
Schooling has become a political football as the country debates about vouchers, testing and holding teachers accountable. African American parents need to consider what is in the best interest of their child. Homeschooling may be the answer. This book can serve as a catalyst for you to make such a critical decision in your child's education.
Although the interviews were informative and the parents views enlightening I felt that the text didn't provide the parent with enough information about the process of home schooling. What curriculums are available that are Afrocentric in nature for a family to follow? How do African American children compare with their white counterparts who are also home schooled? What are the obstacles that African-American parents need to watch for when preparing to home school their children?
Home shooling isn't anything new. Mass education as we know it is a "recent" development. Education was at one time only for those in the elite social groups of society. In choosing home schooling know the needs and maturity level of your child. Make sure that you and your spouse are ready to give your full commitment in making it work and above all do research, reseach and more research about homeschooling. This books doesn't provide all of the answers but serves as a catalyst for your child's future education.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on May 17, 2001
If you are interested in homeschooling this book is a great place to start because it is written by the parents and children who are actually doing it. It is very real and speaks directly from their hearts.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on May 21, 2013
The schools don't work. The kids go to school and they don't come home educated. Something is wrong. This book really shows it.

Concerned parents used to make a big splash and raise a fuss, and do all the things that "involved" parents always do. But when the child comes home from school and the parent has to essentially teach them a whole day's material in order for the child to complete their homework, that's a tall order. On top of everything else a family has going on in the afternoons after school, then the parents have to take the whole evening and re-teach the children.

The children aren't dumb. Something is wrong in the schools.

So involved parents are doing the smartest thing -- they are starting to say, "Something is wrong. Even if this situation at the school starts to change, it will be too late for my children."

Parents have to try something new. Homeschool. Unschool. We can do this.

Another good book you should read, to learn about the ins and outs, is John Taylor Gatto Dumbing Us Down: The Hidden Curriculum of Compulsory Schooling, 10th Anniversary Edition. Also Teach Your Own Teach Your Own: The John Holt Book Of Homeschooling.
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