The Myth of Freedom and the Way of Meditation and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$4.00
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: A well-cared-for item that has seen limited use but remains in great condition. The item is complete, unmarked, and undamaged, but may show some limited signs of wear. Item works perfectly.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Myth of Freedom and the Way of Meditation (Shambhala Dragon Editions) Paperback – February 12, 1988


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, February 12, 1988
$6.95 $0.01

Monthly Deal: Up to 50% Off Select Books
Find great deals on religion and spirituality books like New Morning Mercies. Learn more | See all Monthly Deal titles

Editorial Reviews

Review

"All is made painfully clear—we are routed out of our little 'cubby holes', all of our excuses are brought out into the open and exposed for what they are. . . . If it is reality you want and not illusion, this is it. . . . An ego-shattering experience."— The Middle Way --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Chögyam Trungpa (1940–1987) was a meditation master, teacher, and artist who founded Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado, and an international association of meditation centers known as Shambhala International. He is the author of numerous books including Shambhala: Sacred Path of the Warrior and Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Shambhala Dragon Editions
  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Shambhala (February 12, 1988)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0877730849
  • ISBN-13: 978-0877730842
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,963,340 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Chögyam Trungpa (1940-1987)--meditation master, teacher, and artist--founded Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado, the first Buddhist-inspired university in North America; the Shambhala Training program; and an international association of meditation centers known as Shambhala International. He is the author of numerous books including Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior, Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism, and The Myth of Freedom.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 37 people found the following review helpful By S. Plowright on September 23, 2004
Format: Paperback
After reading his excellent book "Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism", I was happy to find another one by this author.

While the first took a razor sharp sword of insight to the idols of delusion which surround us and appeal to our egos. This book takes a finer blade to the ways we fool ourselves into a life of dissatisfaction.

Trungpa uses clear language to explain the path to enlightenment, and the ways in which we sabotage ourselves. He lets us know that a clear view of reality is far more wonderful than our most wild and tempting fantasies of paradise.

If you are serious about meditation or spiritual development, this book is invaluable. Read it more than once, you will find new treasures in it as your perspective changes along the path.

Sweyn
Author of
The Rune Primer: A Down to Earth Guide to the Runes
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
46 of 48 people found the following review helpful By Kim Boykin on September 4, 2000
Format: Paperback
Incisive teachings by one of the most influential Tibetan Buddhist teachers in the West. A central theme: giving up our hopes that meditation will bring us bliss or tranquility or make us better or wiser people or otherwise serve our ego's purposes, and realizing the liberation that is right here within our pain and confusion and neurosis.

Trungpa's "Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism" seems to be more widely known and more often recommended, but I like "The Myth of Freedom" even better, and I think it's a more suitable book for folks who are new to meditation. Also recommended: "The Wisdom of No Escape" by Trungpa's student Pema Chodron.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Adrian S. on November 25, 2007
Format: Paperback
An online friend recommended that I read this book, so after a few months of procrastinating I did it. I read it once and I'm far from telling that I can fully appreciate and comment on its message. Not surprisingly, that friend recommended I read it more times, leaving a couple of months in between to digest it. However, I can say that even the superficial understanding I gained from one pass makes me say this is a great book.
It is a manual of Buddhism, but in its spiritual but not religious meaning - there are any rituals between the covers, only teachings on how we should behave, think, and most importantly, feel.
As Trungpa puts it, Buddhism is a religion different from others in that it doesn't promise heaven or other ransom at the end of the life, but instead it helps us to live our live the way it is, full of suffering. But why do we suffer? Because we are ignorant of the pure nature of things and ourselves, and we try to explain it, understand and define ourselves as an entity separated from the rest of the world: in short, because we create an ego. This word - ego - shows up very often in the book, and it can be said it is its central subject.
Trungpa presents the Buddhist teachings which explain how the ego is formed, starting from basic ignorance of primordial nature of things, and, adding layer over layer, up to intellect and consciousness. We suffer because of the basic ignorance, of the duality we created, but to successfully remove it we must first remove the upper layers. The first to be removed is the consciousness, in which our thoughts play the most important role, so the first thing to do is to observe thoughts (in a semi-controlled fashion) - and this is the purpose of meditation.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
33 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Jason Mierek on March 21, 2006
Format: Paperback
For starters, this is not a book for reading only; instead, it is a companion to regular contemplative practice (albeit not necessarily one that is "Buddhist").

I was "forced" to read this book as a graduate student at The Naropa Institute (in the same way that all students are "forced" to read textbooks) and found that I got very little out of the book. While at times his presentation was incredibly lucid, at other times Trungpa's turns of phrase made little sense, leading our circle of student heretics to coin the descriptive phrase "Trungpa-babble." (Full-disclosure: One of the reasons that this book appeared so jargon-laden at the time I first read it probably had to do with the fact that my sitting practice was very new and so I had little experience with which to compare Trungpa's ideas.)

On re-reading this book as one of the titles on my guru's reading lists, I was impressed by how much of the same material that had once left me cold now applied directly to my life and practice. Trungpa definitely takes the "romance" out of spiritual practice and reveals it to be as mundane as going to work, eating dinner, or taking a bath. Like those other activities, though, meditation (in this context the basic practice of sitting with oneself and familiarizing oneself with the neurosis and clarity that make up the mind) is essential to a life fully lived.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By ggayuski@aol.com on October 6, 1997
Format: Paperback
I disagree with the other person reviewing this book, this is a very traditional book, a no-nonsense approach to buddhist practice and against a "sugar and spice" spiritual materialism (fake spirituality). I've been practicing for 20 years and have been reading this book at different times all along; I still take enormous refreshment in this book. If you really want a direct look at genuine, basic buddhist practice read it. It is almost painfully honest.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews