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Freedom of the Monsoon: A fight for love and freedom Kindle Edition

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Length: 356 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled

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Product Details

  • File Size: 1212 KB
  • Print Length: 356 pages
  • Publisher: Malika Gandhi (February 14, 2014)
  • Publication Date: February 14, 2014
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0070VV9TI
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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More About the Author

Malika Gandhi was born in Mumbai, previously known as Bombay. She has worked as an administrator in various places but gave up work when her younger son was born.

She has been writing seriously for two years but has dabbled in creative writing excercises and has attended seminars and conferences since her university days.

She came to writing Freedom of the Monsoon after studying Mohandas Gandhi, otherwise known as Mahatma Gandhi - the half-dressed fakir, who was her inspiration. After reading numerous books and watching films on the devastation
the Quit India Movement brought about, Malika wanted to show the 'human' side of the Independence era. She wanted to show the affects of the movement in every day life, getting away from the the politics.

Freedom of the Monsoon is set in 1940's India and shows the story from five points of view.

Malika lives with her husband and two young boys in Leicester, UK. She married into the Gandhi family and moved from London. NB. She and her family are not related to Mohandas Gandhi.

She is now working on her sequel and works on her blog. You can find more on Malika and her works by visiting her site:

www.malikagandhi.wordpress.com


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Ahmari Das on February 19, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
My mother was born in India may 14 1947, two months before India was free. She was the middle child of 7 children. Her family immigrated to the US in 1955. I grew up hearing of all the pain caused in the revolution and partition from my grandparents and my older aunt's and uncles. My mother married my father, a wasp (white Anglo-Saxon protestant) against her families wishes, although they forgave her, so I was brought up with two cultures, religions, etc. I am an artist, author and RN. It is with this background that I read Mrs. Gandhi's book.

This book has been edited since some of the older reviews have been written and many of the problems stated are not present. This should be noted. The use of Hindi with translation in brakets is distracting to me but I don't need the transition. I feel the Hindi is important to the story as it help the reader immerse in the flavor of India, and readers unfamiliar with Hindi stated it was to hard to look up the words in a glossary. I feel this is a great compromise. One reviewer complained the translations were not exact. I feel they are enough to give the reader an understanding of the scene without a lengthy definition.

This book was an emotional read, beautifully written. I feel it truly represents what my family lived through, as they were not involved in the politics, but suffered greatly. My Nani lost her whole family with the exception of one sister who came to the US with them. They were part of a movement to revive Buddhism in India. They were killed by Muslims. This is not a history book; it is not here to teach you; it isn't 100% historically accurate as one review criticized; it isn't supposed to be. It is historical FICTION, and I believe in this context the author is very successful. I was able to feel what the characters were feeling, the pain, lose and turmoil, as well as the friendships and love.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Lola on June 4, 2012
Format: Paperback
In her words and through her wisdom, we learn about the History of India in the forties of the 20th century, as miss Gandhi describe the fight of India for freedom. It is a heart breaking story of personal scarifies, as a whole community is fighting for its freedom in a way that leaves you heart broken. I enjoyed reading the book and learning about the people and their perspectives, their experience, and the way they look at life and the value of life. I learned while enjoying. I give this book 5 stars!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Roy Murry, Author on November 5, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Freedom of the Monsoon
Written by Malika Gandhi

Reviewed by Roy Murry

The horrific events of the Mahatma Gandhi's Quiet Revolution and the conflict between white and brown Indians are brought to light in Ms. Gandhi's Freedom of the Monsoon. Mahandas, his real name was the Bapu, endeared father of the non-violent revolution that led India to freedom from British rule in 1947.

In Malika's historical novel we feel the pain of being dominated by another race of people, who have no real understanding of what being a Hindu or Muslim Indian entailed in that era. Conflicts arose because of these misinterpretations. Using a village's involvement as the nucleus of her story, the Indian point of view is enhanced.

Un-necessary deaths, jailing's, and killings were the norm according to the flow of events that led to the uprising that followed. This story has been told a number of times; however, Ms. Gandhi gets to the core of the conflict.

That miss-understanding of language and customs lead to conflicts. She details the areas between the caste system and the religious norms using the language of the period throughout this story. The reader will have to go with the slow flow of the Indian polite dialog to get the feelings behind each character's adventure.

Those conflicts: love affairs between people of different classes, religions, color, and government vs. the people will keep you involved. Villager's interwoven into what was an era that changed all their lives.

Ms. Gandhi did a fine job with her interpretations of the era surrounding The Quiet Revolution.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Alex Canton-Dutari on May 22, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
I am partial to stories about India; this I must admit, which makes me begin my readings with high hopes. The way this story related to the struggle for independence and resulting partition of India and the new Pakistan caught my interest and motivated me to keep on reading, no matter what.
Ms Gandhi's characters told their own stories in first person -- even the deceased. In fact, when this occurred early in the book, I wondered how the plot would work. Well, she was able to weave each story into an understandable web, including poetic descriptions.
This is a book written in English-as-a-second-language, and it needs editing for punctuation -- there is an interesting use of commas rather than semi-colons. Some grammar issues may be attributed to local English lore -- "...repeating the lord's name under her breath." Would this be the Lord, or a minor god?
I was very much bothered by the overuse of Hindi throughout the book. Even having a detailed glossary made reading difficult. Could it be that the customer target is the English speaking Indian?
In spite of the latest comments on the how-it was-written I liked the book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Juliet B Madison on March 1, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
When I heard about the revised of this book I was curiously sceptical. I enjoyed the original and, unlike some, I didn't find the multiple POV narrative style remotely confusing because I use the same narrative structure in my own books.

However I was pleasantly surprised and found the revised edition hard to put down. Being familiar with the characters and story helped me to make a favourable comparison.

Malika Ghandi has successfully turned an already excellent book into something even better, This is a beautiful story of love, friendship, community and courage set against one of the most turbulent times of Indian history. This fictional account of the Quit India struggle and partition is told through the eyes of ordinary Indian people rather than the opinions of famous historical figures.

Malika Ghandi has woven a tale with her colourful evocative prose, authentic dialogue ad vivid characterisation. These are characters that you ill come to care about and so they stay with you long after you click past the last page and that's the measure of a great story. The characters really came to life for me, especially Pooja who was a lot stronger than she believed herself to be. Indian terminology is explained without breaking the narrative flow. While there are dark aspects in this book the more depressing and harrowing aspects of the original have been removed or modified which is no bad thing.

I will definitely be looking for more books by Malika in future as I can't recommend this highly enough. Whether you have read the original or not this is well worth your time and money. I'm just sorry I can only give five stars.
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