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Freedom Riders: 1961 and the Struggle for Racial Justice Paperback – Abridged, March 11, 2011

ISBN-13: 978-0199754311 ISBN-10: 0199754314 Edition: Abridged

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; Abridged edition (March 11, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199754314
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199754311
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.1 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #62,604 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Arsenault brings vividly to life a defining moment in modern American history." --Eric Foner, The New York Times Book Review

"Authoritative, compelling history." --William Grimes, The New York Times

"For those interested in understanding 20th-century America, this is an essential book." --Roger Wilkins, Washington Post Book World

"Arsenault's record of strategy sessions, church vigils, bloody assaults, mass arrests, political maneuverings and personal anguish captures the mood and the turmoil, the excitement and the confusion of the movement and the time." --Michael Kenney, The Boston Globe

About the Author

Raymond Arsenault is John Hope Franklin Professor of Southern History at the University of South Florida, St. Petersburg.

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Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

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Exhilarating and disturbing to discover what really happened.
Njb
This was an amazing and poweful story of the struggle for civil rights.
donna50
Informative, detailed account of an important historical event.
Elizabeth Brown

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By William B. Jones on May 17, 2011
Format: Paperback
"Freedom Riders" is a crucial telling of a portion of the American civil rights movement fifty years after its occurrence, by those who lived it, resisted it, reported it and learned from it. Presented on film as an American Experience production, and condensed here as a companion book by Raymond Arsenault from his original version. Ann Bausum offers younger readers a telling of these events in "Freedom Riders: John Lewis and Jim Zwerg on the Front Lines of the Civil Rights Movement."

Dave Garrow's 1987 Pulitzer Prize "Bearing the Cross" covered the development of "Freedom Summer" (and the Kennedys' learning curve) as well, as did Taylor Branch's "Parting the Waters." Lynne Olson's "Freedom's Daughter's" offers particular insight into the key role Diane Nash played.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Gregory Alan Wingo on November 11, 2013
Format: Paperback
Being a good historian Dr. Arsenault has obeyed the 50-year rule of historical research but just barely with this abridged edition. Covering the civil rights event known as the Freedom Rides he provides us with both a powerful story and the factual detail to support it. It also has a companion film of the same name produced as part of PBS' American Experience. There is, of course, also available the unabridged version for the serious student of history.

This text is visceral in its description of violence and depravity that was inflicted on the Freedom Riders and it speaks directly to the human drama and pure courage of the four hundred and thirty-six members who placed their very lives at risk for the concept of freedom and equality and the right of all Americans to participate within the rights granted under the US Constitution. It also illuminates the level of racism and hatred that infiltrated all levels of Southern society and the ongoing failure of the Federal government to enforce the promise of our Nation's principles.

The professor places great importance on how the Freedom Riders reinvigorated the civil rights movements and made possible the future successes of the 60s. It is not a flattering portrayal of the Kennedy administration, the established civil rights' leaders or their organizations. It firmly concludes that it was the empowerment of Black and White youths that made the Freedom Rides a success and brought nonviolent protests to the forefront of the civil rights movement and moved it away from litigation as the sole path to equality.

In a time of rising racism and White fear it is an important book for those of us too young to remember Jim Crow to learn the sacrifices that were made for all Americans.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By norrie the scot on July 24, 2011
Format: Paperback
This insightful, unemotive review of the courageous acts of de-segregationists depicts their historic, life-changing bravery in the face of the evils of white supremacy. Their story must be told, and re-told, to help inspire others in the ongoing fight against racism, wherever it manifests.
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By Njb on January 15, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I started this book at 7 pm and finally put it down at 3am, picked it up again at 7am and could get nothing else done until I finished it. Exhilarating and disturbing to discover what really happened. Well researched and cited.
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By Benjamin Varner on November 9, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This was a well-written, informative read. What a tumultuous period in our history. The atrocities committed against other people are unforgivable but the courage and resilience shown by these heroes is what this America is about.

Thank you for telling this story.
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By Rosalie A.Moyer on March 24, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This was an incredible book!! Raymond Arsenault did a fantastic job with putting this very crucial part of American history in the
forefront of the struggle for human rights. Very insightful!!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Freedom Riders’ author Raymond Arsenault tells us about bold civil rights activists, determined to desegregate buses and bus facilities in America’s South through non-violent direct action. The 1954 United States Supreme Court decision, Brown v. Board of Education called for an end to separate but equal Jim Crow laws—separate dining and restroom facilities for “colored” and “white,” for example—but in practice the law did not change much, especially in America’s Deep South. Seven years after the landmark decision, interstate bus operators like Greyhound and Trailways, and the terminals that served them, still remained segregated.
In May 1961, the civil rights group, Congress of Racial Equality (“CORE”) launched a direct action challenge to the status quo. Determined to employ a Gandhian-style, non-violent method to change the system, CORE organized groups of volunteers to board Greyhound and Trailways buses and head southward. CORE deployed well-organized, well-trained, racially diverse teams, comprising black and white volunteer riders. Each team had a leader. A handful of journalists joined these initial rides. The first rides began in Washington D.C. destined for New Orleans, following a precarious route through Virginia, the Carolinas, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and on to Louisiana.
The mission called for non-violent direct challenges to desegregation of buses and facilities. Black riders would purposefully sit in the front of the bus—seats traditionally reserved for white passengers; and some whites would purposefully sit in the back. At rest stops and dining facilities the riders peacefully challenged the “white’s only” and “colored only” signs.
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