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Freedom's Choice Turtleback – January, 1999

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Turtleback, January, 1999
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Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

YA?In what may be her best series since the early "Pern" novels, McCaffrey has created yet another winner. While conquering and colonizing the universe, the alien Catteni take the misfits and troublemakers they encounter and dump them on empty planets. If they survive, then the Catteni move in. Freedom's Landing (Putnam, 1995) introduced a human/alien group struggling just to stay alive. In this second book, these Botany Bay-like survivors have overcome hardships to establish a society of sorts. Zainal, a renegade Catteni, and his fellow dumpees have begun to strike back at their oppressors. They are also trying to uncover the identity of the original residents of the planet and enlist their support. McCaffrey has developed another exotic world peopled with interesting, well-developed characters. This book stands alone but works better with the first novel.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Continuing the storyline from Freedom's Landing (LJ 4/15/95), this second book in the series finds the human and aliens on the penal planet Botany planning a rebellion against their slavemasters. After the Catteni subdue and transport to penal colony planets people from Earth and other civilizations for their Eosi masters, one Catteni, Zainal, chooses to remain on Botany. His plan? To join his fellow slaves in convincing the absentee owners of the planet to turn against the Eosi and free the colonists. McCaffrey is at her best with interspecies interactions and uniting for a goal against a common enemy. Highly recommended for sf collections.
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Turtleback
  • Publisher: Demco Media (January 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0606155376
  • ISBN-13: 978-0606155373
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 4.5 x 7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (84 customer reviews)

More About the Author

Anne McCaffrey, the Hugo Award-winning author of the bestselling Dragonriders of Pern® novels, is one of science fiction's most popular authors. With Elizabeth Ann Scarborough she co-authored Changelings and Maelstrom, Books One and Two of The Twins of Petaybee. McCaffrey lives in a house of her own design, Dragonhold-Underhill, in County Wicklow, Ireland.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By QueFret on September 12, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I began this series and fairly enjoyed the first book - not the best, not the worst, interesting ideas. However, this book completely bewildered me. The female protagonist is supposed to be smart, strong, and independent. She and others have been cast away on an unpopulated planet to colonize. Now in book two, only nine months after landing on the planet, every colonist is obsessed with the women of child-bearing years becoming pregnant. The heroine is told she must get pregnant and can choose any man, but she has to further the population. Mind you, she's only 22 - plenty of time to have babies. She has already chosen an alien lover, and does not want to taint their relationship, nor does she want children at this time. Plot breaker: she breaks her arm, a co-colonist male friend gets her drunk on medicinal whisky, and has sex with her. Tada! She's pregnant. And everyone, including the protagonist AND her lover, seems to be okay with this. She isn't even the slightest bit disturbed that another man took advantage of her. How in the world do you expect me to believe she is a strong female character?
I have other beefs, such as the flatness of all the characters and the sometimes grating dialogue. But I kept hoping it would get better. No, it doesn't. As such, I am done with this book and this series. Shame. I rarely drop books in the middle of my reading.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 3, 1997
Format: Hardcover
I have been one of those who mourned Anne McCaffeys' decison to MERGE with other writers....supplying the plot while others tell the tale. This book, with her name alone on the spine, should be the real thing, I thought!...on the a par with the best of the Dragonriders ansd Crystal-Singers!
WRONG! This novel does have a story underneath all, possibly even a story worthy of McCaffrey, but it loses itself in the banality of the taletelling!

The novel, the second part of a series, is set on a planet to which recaltricants are sent by a superior race who have conquered and colonized Earth, along with many other planets. They have a surefire way of working out which planets are suitable for further development....dump the troublemakers on it, with minumum survival-supplies. If there are lots of survivors at check-time, send more `colonists' and put in an overlord; if there are few or no survivors, write off that planet!

McCaffrey has obviously read Australian history....the planet is named Botany, a main settlement is Sydney, and the colonists use crossbows...and boomerangs!! The basic construct of the novel is actually worthy of better than the `Boys Own 'treatment it gets. I mean, these are thinking, breathing, argumentative Earth people,transported , unconscious and against their will, to other planets where they will be slaves, or fodder, or worse...torn from careers, family, friends, heritage.... yet we are expected to believe that they settle into a mixed-race-planet with no backward glances, no arguments, no established governments, no TRAUMAS! And how INVENTIVE they are, and how uncomplicated their lives as the sandwiches keep coming form the kitchen even as they face interstellar hazards quite unthought of...
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 11, 1997
Format: Audio Cassette
If you read Ann McCaffrey for her high level of character development, dialogue and plotting, you will be disappointed with this one. This is a story that seems to have been written for a younger audience, an audience that has not been exposed to the cliche's of the genre. Take for instance, the capture of the ships. One ship was believable, two, barely, but not three. Add on the successful trip to the other planet, and now you have something you might see on tv. The characterization is extremely sketchy, so sketchy in fact, that the reader is left wondering why Kris is in love with Zainal, the dumped Catteni.
Another point is the way everybody fits in with the program. There is no angry feminist furiously protesting her new role in society; that is; as being an empty womb needing filling. There are no slightly psychotic women clutching a pillow, weeping for a lost baby on another world. And
there are no men wishing for a lost wife or loved children. These people were ripped from their homes and no one weeps? And who are these aliens
that were dumped with them? How do they fit in with the humans so easily? What about cultural differences? Oh, the Turs are so anti-social that
they are immediatly ex-communicated. The "why" is never discussed. I laughed out loud when the Farmers showed up. Their physical appearance was
steriotypically godlike alien. And the Mentats seem more spoiled brats than actual threats.
This is definatly not one of McCaffrey's best works. I wonder how it passed by her editors in its present form. Bypass this one, unless you are looking for something light and somewhat brainless.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Megan on April 19, 2015
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I liked the first book, and the first half of this one was okay if a little slow. At about the halfway point, I had to put it down. It was just ridiculous. First, I'm a little upset that there is little to no character development, both with the main characters and the new characters being introduced. The first book was pretty good about letting you get to know new characters with each drop, but in this one all of a sudden there's a bunch of new people and very little is actually said about them, and many of the minor characters, that were actually given character, in the previous book have just disappeared. The second big problem I had with this book were the weak female characters. I assumed that with a strong woman as the main character in this series, that other strong women would be highlighted as well. Keep in mind that I only read the first half of this book, but from what I saw, Kris was the only woman included in meetings, and that was mostly due to the insistence of her lover, her contributions, when she actually contributed, were defense of her lover or some other man. And the one other meeting that I remember with other women included, the women were not able to put together a comprehensible thought let alone say anything of value. It is as if the author felt the need to make all of the women as weak as possible to highlight how great the heroine is. I do not have a lot of respect for women authors who write other women as weak and boring. They should know better. And reason I finally put the book down, and I don't put books down very often, is the whole planet-wide pregnancy decision. This is the decision of the other people of the planet for all fertile women to have babies due to the men outnumbering the women. Or at least that's how I understood it.Read more ›
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