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Freemasonry and the Birth of Modern Science Paperback – March 4, 2004

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Robert Lomas is the co-author of The Hiram Key, The Second Messiah, and Uriel's Machine. A Freemason, he lectures at Bradford University in England.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Fair Winds Press; Second Edition edition (March 4, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1592330649
  • ISBN-13: 978-1592330645
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.1 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #157,391 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Dr Robert Lomas gained a B.Sc with first-class honors in electronics before earning a Ph.D in solid-state physics with a particular interest in developing the theory and practice of crystalline semi-conducting hetro-junction photo-optic devices. He went on to work on the development of the first micro-processor chips and missile guidance systems before specializing in software development for command and control systems used by the Fire, Ambulance and Rescue Services. He later developed expertise in data mining and data capture techniques which he used to improve the response times of emergency services control rooms. For a while he was a visiting lecturer at the Fire Service Staff College where he taught data-based command and control.

In 1986, he became a Freemason and quickly established himself as a popular lecturer on Masonic history before co-authoring the international best-sellers The Hiram Key, The Second Messiah, Uriel's Machine and The Book of Hiram. Since 2000 he has been writing on his own and has a string of best-sellers including Turning the Hiram Key, Freemasonry and the Birth of Modern Science, and The Man Who Invented the Twentieth Century. He also writes text books including Mastering Your Business Dissertation and specialist Masonic books such as The Secret Science of Masonic Initiation. His latest book, for Coronet, is The Lost Key.

He currently lectures in Information Systems at Bradford University School of Management in Yorkshire, United Kingdom

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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Joe Ceirw on June 4, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Robert Lomas, who I first came across when I read the Hiram Key, has tackled a fascinating subject in this book. He tells the story of a little known founder of the Royal Society of London, which is one of the most important scientific organisation in the world. The man Lomas decribes is Sir Robert Moray.
Moray started life as French spy, served in the Scots Rebel Army during the English Civil War, helped negotiate the surrender of King Charles the First, got sent to prision for trying to murder King Charles the Second and then founded the Royal Society. What a man. Lomas has pieced together Moray's story from a whole raft of different sources and then retold it in very readable way.
When I read this book I felt that I understood the politics of the English Civil War for the very first time, and I certainly learned a lot more about the contribution Freemasonry has made to modern society. Dr Lomas is a scientist and it shows in the very clear way he explains the experiments and ideas of these founders of modern science. The review of the Civil War is honest and impartial but the enuthusiasm for the enigmatic Sir Robert Moray shows through in part. A great read.
I heard Lomas being interviewed on Ron Hawk's Mind Body and Spirit Show earlier this week and he talked a lot of sense.
I recommend this book to anyone interested in either science, the English Civil War or Freemasonry.
A worthy successor to the Hiram Key. Keep up the good work Robert!
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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Joseph G. Wick on March 13, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Lomas is anxious to establish that the Royal Society for the Advancement of Learning was founded largely by (Jacobite) Masons. His arguments are a little stretched, but by and large persuasive. Along the way there are some great tidbits about Oliver Cromwell and the Restoration, especially about Charles II and the major Scotsmen of the era. EXCELLENT. Also, the very last part of the book does a plausible job of linking Masonic "philosophy" with the naissance of "scientific thinking." Finally, the last chapter has an excellent summary of what freemasonry is really about. As Masonic history it does a good job of pushing the origins back to about 1500 A.D. Worth noting is that there is a short, interesting and free book available online to purchasers of this book. Your copy will have a passcode to the website. Very good reading if you're interested in the development of our scientific outlook and related institutions.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Arthur D. Reddin on March 10, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I thoroughly enjoyed this book and commend the author for presenting his research in such an accessible form. I've incidentally come to a better understanding of the abiding interest in Jacobean politics by present-day descendants of the Scottish families involved. Perhaps I've also come to an appreciation of the self-identification, stemming from this fascinating history, of some Protestant neighbours from my childhood.
Lomas has included an extensive bibliography but apparently at the time of writing was oblivious to the even more far-reaching account of the principle actors' philosophical roots, as detailed in M. Baigent and R. Leigh's The Elixir and the Stone (Penquin 1998; available at Amazon.ca and Amazon.co.uk)
In summary, the book lives up to all of its claims and is excellent value, particularly in the paperback Fair Winds Press edition or the Headline Mass Market edition, the latter available through Amazon.ca as "The Invisible College.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Notary Tim on September 17, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I have recommended this book to people who are interested in the latest attempt to popularize and combine some of the current theories on where Freemasonry came from and how it connected with the change-over from a feudal society to an industrial society. It has much information that other books suggest or imply, and it presents it in a very readable fashion. Of course, as with most of the books of this sort (from Holy Blood, Holy Grail, right on through other books by Lomas and Knight), the logic of their arguments is not very strong in places. They will sometimes state something is so without giving any basis for making such a claim, or suppose it is so and then later claim it was shown or proven to be so. They also fall into the trap of assuming any symbol has only one meaning, so if 2 groups use the same symbol or symbols, they must be somehow connected. In fact, history shows that certain symbols keep getting reborn and redefined by new groups, many of which are unaware of earlier groups (or even groups that are around at the same time but in different places) that used the same symbols. They are also less than forthcoming in stating that some of those men whom they claim to be Masons are believed by other researchers to not be Masons. Having stated my quibbles, I still believe this is an important book that should be read by all those interested in its subject (Freemasonry and Science) -- just remember, as with all things having to do with Freemasonry, there is no way to know the truth of much that is assumed or claimed, because there were no records of much of this. In other words, take it with a grain of salt, compare it to other books that you trust, and see what light it can shed on your search for truth.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Joe on September 25, 2004
Format: Paperback
Before readiung this book I was inclined to think that Freemasonry was just a slightly spooky charitable dinning club. Lomas's study of the formation of the Royal Society of London made me realise just how important a society freeemasonry is.

This book shows Sir Robert Moray. Charles I and II and Oliver Cromwell in a new light for me. I hadn't realised how Freemasonic ideas had influenced both the growth of science and of American democracy.

Keep up the good work Robert. I'll be looking out for your next book to learn more about Freemasonry
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