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French Kids Eat Everything: How Our Family Moved to France, Cured Picky Eating, Banned Snacking, and Discovered 10 Simple Rules for Raising Happy, Healthy Eaters
 
 


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French Kids Eat Everything: How Our Family Moved to France, Cured Picky Eating, Banned Snacking, and Discovered 10 Simple Rules for Raising Happy, Healthy Eaters [Hardcover]

Karen Le Billon
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (190 customer reviews)

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Book Description

April 3, 2012

French Kids Eat Everything is a wonderfully wry account of how Karen Le Billon was able to alter her children’s deep-rooted, decidedly unhealthy North American eating habits while they were all living in France.

At once a memoir, a cookbook, a how-to handbook, and a delightful exploration of how the French manage to feed children without endless battles and struggles with pickiness, French Kids Eat Everything features recipes, practical tips, and ten easy-to-follow rules for raising happy and healthy young eaters—a sort of French Women Don’t Get Fat meets
Food Rules.


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French Kids Eat Everything: How Our Family Moved to France, Cured Picky Eating, Banned Snacking, and Discovered 10 Simple Rules for Raising Happy, Healthy Eaters + Bébé Day by Day: 100 Keys to French Parenting
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Editorial Reviews

Review

“It takes a brave couple to move two picky–eater kids into a French small town and convert them to foodie omnivores. We have much to learn from European food traditions, and the contrast between French and North American school lunches is a striking example. A must–read for teachers and parents.” (Marion Nestle, Professor of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health at New York University and author of What to Eat)

“Humorous as well as instructive, this culinary adventure will change the lives of parents and children alike. . . . Karen Le Billon and her children learn that it’s okay to feel hungry between meals, turn to mindful eating, and learn the importance of enjoying one’s food.” (Patricia Wells, author of The Provence Cookbook)

“This book is not only about how to teach children (and yourself) to eat well and happily for life, it’s a book about how to help build and maintain the foundations of any civilized society. I loved it. Essential reading, whether you have children or not.” (Laura Calder, author of Dinner Chez Moi and host of French Food at Home)

“A wonderful—and important—book. One family’s topsy-turvy culinary transformation becomes an in-depth exploration of the habits that have kept French kids loving food (and eating spinach) for centuries.” (Elizabeth Bard, author of Lunch in Paris)

“A fascinating and valuable read.” (Lynne Rossetto Kasper)

“A breezy but practical volume for hurried parents looking to keep their kids well-fed. . . . [The] tone is straightforward, generous, and gentle. That Le Billon concludes with a small collection of kid-friendly recipes makes this foodie manifesto all the more accessible.” (Publishers Weekly)

“Le Billon . . . strategically identified questions she faced while living abroad: Why were French kids tidier eaters? Why did they sit quietly at restaurants? Why did her daughter’s teacher suggest she see a therapist when she wanted to pack her school lunch?” (BonAppetit.com)

From the Back Cover

Moving her young family to her husband's hometown in northern France, Karen Le Billon is prepared for some cultural adjustment but is surprised by the food education she and her family (at first unwillingly) receive. In contrast to her daughters, French children feed themselves neatly and happily—eating everything from beets to broccoli, salad to spinach, mussels to muesli. The family's food habits soon come under scrutiny, as Karen is lectured for slipping her fussing toddler a snack—"a recipe for obesity!"—and forbidden from packing her older daughter a lunch in lieu of the elaborate school meal.

The family soon begins to see the wisdom in the "food rules" that help the French foster healthy eating habits and good manners—from the rigid "no snacking" rule to commonsense food routines that we used to share but have somehow forgotten. Soon, the family cures picky eating and learns to love trying new foods. But the real challenge comes when they move back to North America—where their commitment to "eating French" is put to the test. The result is a family food revolution with surprising but happy results—which suggest we need to dramatically rethink the way we feed children, at home and at school.


Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: William Morrow; First Edition edition (April 3, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0062103296
  • ISBN-13: 978-0062103291
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 1 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (190 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #60,322 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Karen Le Billon is an author, teacher, and proud mom of two daughters. She is married to a Frenchman, and her family divides its time between Vancouver and France. Her kids love spinach puree (honest!).

A Rhodes Scholar with a PhD from Oxford University, Karen currently teaches at the University of British Columbia, where she holds a Canada Research Chair. In 2012 she was named a member of Jamie Oliver Foundation's Real Food Advocates team. She is the author of three previous books, and her work has been featured in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Bon Appetit Magazine, and on Good Morning America.

She blogs on France, food, and parenting at FrenchKidsEatEverything.com.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
89 of 93 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Book has transformed how our family eats May 16, 2012
By M.C.D.
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Our daughter is four, and not a bad eater, but I've noticed that dinner time was increasingly becoming tense time where we cajoled her to eat a certain number of bites, sit properly, all with the bribery of dessert. Since reading Le Billon's book a few weeks ago, we've instituted a strict no snacks rule (which has eliminated pre-dinner carbs), and despite some initial resistance (a temper tantrum about matzah), she's now on board. To reduce whining about snacking, we started role playing.

F: "Can I have a snack?"
me: "No."
F: "Why not?"
me: "Because we're saving our appetite for dinner."

She liked it so much she wanted to repeat it five times. Then we switched parts and she got to be the mommy and say "No!" This makes it a game for her, and also helps her know what to expect.

It's striking to me how much I had imbibed the American snack attitude - that to be a good parent, I must have snacks at all time so my kid doesn't go hungry. It's been empowering, both for myself and as a parent to accept that it's okay to be hungry between meals.

Since we were already eating "French" in that we cook from scratch and eat dinner together every night, the other big change has been the rule that we try everything, and it's been amazing to see what F. will try now that she's really hungry at meal times. I'm no longer making mainly foods that F. will like, but thinking about expanding her palate and knowing that she'll try whatever we make. It's a sea change! We recently had our second child, and I'm looking forward to starting him a la francaise on vegetable purees.

A huge message of your book is if we raise our expectations for what our kids can handle, in eating and social behavior, they will surprise us by meeting the challenge. I wish everyone with young kids could read this book.
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203 of 227 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just What I Was Looking For! April 6, 2012
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
I just finished reading this book and I loved it. I bought this after finishing 'Bringing Up Bebe', and I wanted more tips on how to get my child to enjoy more foods. I also wanted to change my own food habits, so this was perfect for me. I hate how I eat and I hate how the way my family eats has affected their health negatively. I am still young and in good health and I want it to stay that way. I don't enjoy eating and food much, because I like to eat and just move on to the next thing as fast as possible. I now realize that by taking my time to eat and to cook healthy meals, I can de-stress and enjoy my life more. Slowing down to enjoy food and family is just what I needed.

I am sure that a lot of people (especially Americans) will probably not give this book as good a review as it deserves, because there are a couple of parts in the book that pretty much say that everything about the way Americans eat (as well as some other Europeans and Canada) is so very wrong. I am inclined to agree 100%, because if nothing was wrong with how Americans eat then our childhood obesity rate wouldn't be what it is. But I can see how some people might be ready to get all upset about somebody telling them that their eating habits are wrong. So unless you want to and are willing to make a big change in your eating habits for the sake of your child, don't bother reading this book. It is the slap in the face that I needed and what I think America needs, but is too lazy and complacent to accept.

So far my family and I have begun changing our lifestyles, little by little, to follow the 'rules' in the book. It has been amazing. We have had several meals 'the French way' and we have enjoyed them immensely.
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101 of 114 people found the following review helpful
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
After a decade of French and France bashing, the pendulum seems to be swinging in the other direction with a range of new books extolling the magic of the French art de vivre. After Pamela Druckerman's coquettish "I'm not even sure I like it here" but nonetheless rose-tinted view of life in France (read, Paris), it's refreshing to read Karen Bakker Le Billon's earnest attempt to understand the French way of educating bébé at the table. While Druckerman bears and rears her children in Paris and in a French cultural context from conception, Le Billon moves with her French husband and two small children, ages two and six at the time, from the ultra-permissive, child-centered food culture of North America (Vancouver, to be exact) to the authoritarian and comparatively rigid environment of Brittany.

The Le Billon grandparents are horrified by the manners and eating habits of their Franco-Canadian grandchildren. From their French family's perspective the children eat constantly, at inappropriate times and places, and with so sense of etiquette - n'importe quoi, n'importe quand et n'importe comment. Le Billon is not happy with her daughters' poor eating habits and limited culinary range, but feels powerless to change them until she realizes that behavior tolerated at home is unacceptable in France and could pose a significant impediment to her children's social acceptance.
With the rational mind and experimental rigor of her academic background, she sets out to identify aspects of French food culture that will help her educate her own children on healthy eating and good manners. What makes the book interesting is that Le Billon is not herself in love with the French way of life and she is not a foodie by a long shot.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Great
informative, illustrated how to go about changing your diet and enjoying your food even more. better than the french women don't get fat. it's a lot more specific.
Published 2 days ago by Maria Wilcox
3.0 out of 5 stars ... me not want to go to France- it sounds like they hate kids
Made me not want to go to France- it sounds like they hate kids! I wanted to strangle the author's mother-in-law- it really pissed me off.
Published 2 days ago by Patty
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book for learning to feed kids a variety of foods!
Excellent book! One of the only ones i had time to read -- invaluable in teaching my kids to eat.
Published 6 days ago by Terry Merrill Wilcox
5.0 out of 5 stars Yes! If only the USA could grasp this concept ...
Yes! If only the USA could grasp this concept. I've told everyone I know with children about this book. Helped to change the way we eat and view food.
Published 8 days ago by Michele F.
5.0 out of 5 stars good read!
Very interesting and entertaining. A cultural experience
Published 12 days ago by Milly
5.0 out of 5 stars and invest 3 hours in your lifetime for a great awakening moment
very educational for all ages who are struggling with North American eating habits. Helps us to choose how and what we eat and helps us to train our kids properly
whoever is... Read more
Published 12 days ago by ujwal meka
5.0 out of 5 stars love this book
love this book, very entertained for a foody person who is very interested in providing a good nutrition basis to his 3 year old child
Published 15 days ago by Anaité Díaz
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
A good read. I couldn't put it down.
Published 19 days ago by Frank Valdez
5.0 out of 5 stars Loved this book
Fantastic book! We can learn a lot from the French. I did think the author was a pretty indulgent mom, though. Not sure if she is a good representation of American moms. Read more
Published 27 days ago by Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Exactly what I wanted and arrived so quickly!
Published 1 month ago by Jenny
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Don't you think that this book outlines a better approach that could...
This book, for American in general, is best applied on a personal, home level. I believe the author's desire to revamp her children's school lunch program is delusional. The reason is because, in France, their philosophy of education children comes from Rousseau. Children do not belong to... Read More
May 22, 2013 by Corrina |  See all 7 posts
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