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Freud's Wishful Dream Book Hardcover – September 19, 1994


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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Like The Interpretation of Dreams, Welsh's book is rich and provocative, subtle and complex, and sometimes brilliant."--W. R. Niedzwiecki, Boston Book Review

From the Inside Flap

"[This book] uncovers the shrewdness of Freud's complex substitution of 'wishfulness' for 'ambition' in the theory and praxis of dream-interpretation. We are still coming to terms with Freud's literary enterprise, which he masked as scientism; Welsh helps immensely in removing the mask."--Harold Bloom, Yale University

"Welsh has a keen, intuitive understanding of the complex, devious, often sardonic and teasing way in which Freud's mind works. This is a first-class book that will make some readers howl and others smile. Few will be indifferent, and none will be able to overturn Welsh's carefully pondered and elegantly presented conclusions."--Frederick Crews, University of California

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 168 pages
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press; 1st edition (September 19, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0691037183
  • ISBN-13: 978-0691037189
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 6.4 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,681,118 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Umair Ahmed Muhajir on November 23, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This book goes a long way toward locating Freud in the tradition of the nineteenth-century novel. Welsh (unlike many who tackle Freud these days) is imaginatively equipped to engage with "The Interpretation of Dreams," and approaches the book as one would a literary text, perhaps the only way in which it is possible to read Freud anymore. In doing so he manages to avoid the twin pitfalls of adulation and "Freud-bashing"; "useful" is the way I'd characterize it.
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6 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 21, 1997
Format: Hardcover
This commentary on Freud's biggest book is rather characteristic of the books being written these days. Its argument is tendentious and its scholarship trashy. To mention a random example, Welsh points out Freud's habit of never having discussions after reading papers, quoting Jones (his only source) for support. Now, I would advise Professor Welsh to do a little bit of research on this subject--5 minutes of research and careful reading would suffice to prove the contrary. It seems to be a recent trend to believe Jones whenever he writes something stupid, and ignore everything else. Professor Welsh is just another one of those trendy academics who are ready to jump on Freud whenever they see a chance. His strategy of calling Freud a product of the 19th century is old, really old, as if our malicious professor hasn't read much of the anti-Freudian literature either. This book is simply weak
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