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Friendly Fire: American Images of the Vietnam War Paperback – November 2, 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (November 2, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0195141962
  • ISBN-13: 978-0195141962
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.1 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,029,805 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"This critical study offers a forceful, yet nuanced, reading of important literature and film concerning the Vietnam War....THrough powerful readings and analysis, Kinney deconstructs the John Wayne myth, the concept of the Other, and the loci of sense and senselessness permeating the literature....This is a major work of criticism in the field, offering in clear, well-written prose new and startling insights....Highly recommended."--Choice

About the Author

Katherine Kinney is at University of California, Riverside.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Brent H. Barnett on January 11, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Katherine Kinney's book is a miniature first class education. Having taken classes from Dr.Kinney I was eager to read her book and found every chapter a satisfying line of criticism. Ignore all negative or unappreciative reviews of this book or this author.
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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Andrew C. Howe on January 2, 2005
Format: Hardcover
In "Friendly Fire," Katherine Kinney offers a fascinating cultural analysis of the Vietnam conflict as it has been represented through popular media. Writing in a style accessible to the casual reader and the serious Vietnam scholar alike, she explores America's involvement in Vietnam by paying particular attention to how certain cultural fears and desires have been reflected through the portrayal of this historical conflict.

You may have read the only other Amazon review of this book, an embarrassing and cowardly hatchet-job by a disgruntled ex-graduate student at the University of California, Riverside, the university at which the book's author is a well-respected professor and scholar. As a former student at this university, I immediately recognized the author of this character assassination (despite the cowardice of the unsigned post), a student whose shoddy performance on their doctoral examinations was one of the truly embarrassing moments in recent, departmental history (the gulf between expectation and actuality was enormous). My recommendation would be to ignore this vindictive attack from an arrogant and unstable person who is pretty much viewed as a joke in the English Department at UC Riverside.

Oxford University Press, long noted for publishing interesting, relevant, and cutting-edge work, has done so yet again with "Friendly Fire." For those interested in the Vietnam War, post-WWII masculinity, or media studies, this book will provide a fascinating read.

Signed,

Andrew Howe
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Andrew Howe on December 27, 2004
Format: Hardcover
In "Friendly Fire," Katherine Kinney offers a fascinating cultural analysis of the Vietnam conflict as it has been represented through popular media. Writing in a style accessible to the casual reader and the serious Vietnam scholar alike, she explores America's involvement in Vietnam by paying particular attention to how certain cultural fears and desires have been reflected through the portrayal of this historical conflict.

You may have read the only other Amazon review of this book, an embarrassing and cowardly hatchet-job by a disgruntled ex-graduate student at the University of California, Riverside, the university at which the book's author is a well-respected professor and scholar. As a former student at this university, I immediately recognized the author of this character assassination (despite the cowardice of the unsigned post), a student whose shoddy performance on their doctoral examinations was one of the truly embarrassing moments in recent, departmental history (the gulf between expectation and actuality was enormous). My recommendation would be to ignore this vindictive attack from an arrogant and unstable person who is pretty much viewed as a joke in the English Department at UC Riverside.

Oxford University Press, long noted for publishing interesting, relevant, and cutting-edge work, has done so yet again with "Friendly Fire." For those interested in the Vietnam War, post-WWII masculinity, or media studies, this book will provide a fascinating read.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Don on June 19, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I was only able to get 3 chapters into this book until I gave it up. What a bunch of rambling dribble. By the time I got to chapter 3 there was almost nothing about Vietnam. It was mainly comparisons of Hollywood and the Second World War. The author drones on and on trying to impress with his knowledge of the English language. Talking about everything except friendly fire during the Vietnam War. Worst book I ever tried to read.
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1 of 12 people found the following review helpful By NoPCBS on April 15, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
Whatever is inside this book, good or bad, is irrelevant.

If you know even the least bit about the sacrifice represented by the famous photo and (later) monument that is vandalized on the cover of this book, then you know what an obscenity the cover is.

Disgusting and inexcusable.
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