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Fringes of Reason Whole Earth Paperback – December 12, 1988

ISBN-13: 978-0517571651 ISBN-10: 051757165X Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 223 pages
  • Publisher: Harmony; 1st edition (December 12, 1988)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 051757165X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0517571651
  • Product Dimensions: 10.7 x 8.2 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #282,134 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 24, 1998
Though billed as something of a guide to various eccentric views and kooks generally, this is not so much a "freak show" (as is, say, Stang's "High Weirdness by Mail") as it is a painless introduction to critical thinking on such subjects. Mostly skeptical in outlook, it does have material on what appear to be genuine mysteries -- for example, the best short review of spontaneous human combustion I've seen. Also a nice short piece on the real (so to speak) "Men in Black" (before the movie ...), and a very entertaining and lucid explanation of a common pyramid scam in New Age clothing.
Lots of illustrations and sidebars on further reading in the style of the old Whole Earth Catalog and CoEvolution Quarterly. Individual articles seem very well researched.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 16, 1997
The Fringes of Reason is an unique look at religious cults and movements in the US. Organized in the style of "The Last Whole Earth Catolog," the books highlights such movements as occultism and shamanism, along with such sects as one which believes John F. Kennedy is God (I'm not kidding). A nicely logical,reasonable look at religion and its stranger manifestations.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Riverine on April 21, 2006
I have an extensive and eclectic library, from classical literature to contemporary science, Gary Larson cartoons and rock and roll biographies, but only one book has earned a place on my coffee table year after year... the wonderful "Fringes of Reason."

I love to pick it up and let it fall open to some amazing new tidbit that unfailingly causes me to laugh at (with?) the endearing foolishness of my species. This book is a treasure trunk simply brimming over with short articles, photographs and diagrams, each more riveting than the next, of witty, skeptical yet affectionate reporting on the absurdities of human pseudoscience.

The book is far TOO affectionate to serve as a true skeptical encyclopedia. Since its publication, the field of skeptical literature has blossomed; there have been many far more rigorous and properly debunking analyses of the weird and supernatural. But none is so sweetly entertaining. I love this book.

Where and who is Ted Schultz? I insist he update this book! One can't read "Fringes of Reason" and not burn to know what the "fringe folk" are up to in the 21st century.
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