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From Age-ing to Sage-ing: A Revolutionary Approach to Growing Older Paperback – December 1, 1997


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 303 pages
  • Publisher: Time Warner Books; Later Printing edition (December 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0446671770
  • ISBN-13: 978-0446671774
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.2 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #117,333 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

In the next 20 years 75 million Americans will be reaching retirement age. To deal with this sea change, Rabbi Schachter-Shalomi (Paradigm Shift, Jason Aronson, 1993) introduces the concept of "eldering," or mentoring, each other in the years ahead. He contends that we are at the cutting edge of the next stage in our evolution and that elders will bring us into this more compassionate, intuitive, and caring era. In Part 1 of the book, Schachter-Shalomi recommends meditation, exercise, and spiritual healing to help individuals enter their later years, while in Part 2 he speaks to our limited perceptions of death. Creating ceremonies and learning to forgive help ease the transition into death, according to Schachter-Shalomi, who believes in the certainty of life after death. Adding a personal dimension, the rabbi compassionately relates his own mental crisis as he approaches the age of 60 to help readers understand the process. Highly recommended for public and academic libraries with gerontology collections.?Lisa Wise, Univ. of Southern Colorado, Pueblo
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Schachter-Shalomi, a rabbi dreading retirement, realized that he must "recontextualize aging as the anticipated fulfillment of life, not its inevitable decline." So he devised Spiritual Eldering--a social activism, awareness, and mentoring program. The rabbi provides instructions on selecting people to mentor and how to go about doing so. He supples advice on helping individuals, family, community, and the planet. In his analysis of how elderly people can learn conscious dying (or the acceptance of death), the author pulls concepts from multiple religious traditions: Christianity, Judaism, Hinduism, and Buddhism, among others. A worthwhile, multicultural look at the value of aging individuals and the work they could have in store for them. Denise Perry Donavin --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Beautifully written and a compelling read.
B. Burris
In this work, Reb Zalman elegantly and sensitively shows us the beauty in embodying one of our last phases of life, how to move from "age-ing" to "sage-ing."
Amitai
It is a full, rich book, worth reading and re-reading.
Marian Van Eyk McCain

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

44 of 46 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 23, 1998
Format: Paperback
What is the purpose of life lived long past the reproductive years? Using their concepts of "elderhood" and "the art of life completion," Schacter-Shalomi and Miller survey the societal changes that they believe are synchronistic events that give meaning and purpose to the burgeoning population of elders in American society and other developed countries. An increasing number of writers share these men's belief that the aged are needed to guide humanity in its values, to influence the young to make the changes that consider the distant future as well as the present. Rabbi Schacter-Shalomi has spent his adult life studying numerous spiritual disciplines. He believes that the present easy access to ancient spiritual teachings that were once passed secretly from one generation of adepts to the next is for the purpose of allowing large populations to prepare themselves for their contribution to humanity as wise elders. The major theme of this work could be said to be the art of lving and dying with meaning. Going beyond the usual observations of the characteristics of our rapidly aging population, Schacter-Shalomi and Miller have offered sound advice on how an individual can find purpose in life beyond reproduction and career. They even offer specific "Exercises for Sages in Training."
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33 of 35 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 7, 2000
Format: Paperback
Age-ing to Sage-ing is indeed a profound new vision for aging. In a time when our elder population is rapidly growing, it is important that people find meaning in their elder years. Rabbi Schacter-Shalomi has used his own journey as a stepping off point to assist people in making the most of the extra gift of years they have been given in this century. I highly recommend this book because it not only provides theory about becoming a spiritual elder, but also talks about tools for this and gives exercises for this in an appendix. Rabbi Schacter-Shalomi has an incredible grasp of a wide range of religious beliefs and a very wholistic view of spirituality. His message has provided inspiration for myself as well as mnay people I work with. I also recommend Winter Grace, by Kathleen Fischer.
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27 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Marian Van Eyk McCain on July 11, 2002
Format: Paperback
These days, in our Western culture, for many man and woman over 40, the aging process has become something to fear. Which is utterly crazy, given that most people nowadays are barely half way through their lives at that point. It's like wanting to leave the restaurant somewhere in the middle of the main course and without tasting the dessert at all.
I liked this book because it is one of the few to look deeply into the whole adventure of aging and to broadcast to the world that the later decades of life have a different - and surprisingly wonderful - agenda all of their own. It is time for us older folk to stop cringing about getting older but to open to the process and re-own our place as 'wise elders.' As I was writing my own book - ELDERWOMAN - which is specifically for women, this wise man's book was a marvellous resource for me. It is a full, rich book, worth reading and re-reading. The exercises are useful and practical and the ideas are powerful. Highly recommended.
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26 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Arthur Gershman on October 17, 2001
Format: Paperback
My attraction to the first named author, Zalman Schachter-Shalomi was due to his reputation as a cabalist, the Jewish practice of mysticsm. When I bought and first read this book, in 1995, I was a mere 48 years old, much too young to put its sage advice into practice. This book is for the retired, and even then is not for everyone. When I lent it to my retired friend in California with whom I swap jokes on the internet, her comment was "Although it was a difficult read, bogged down in places, and I didn't like how it was written, it did say a lot of important things and was worth reading" 3-4 stars would't you say?
In any event, the authors discuss the "theory of spiritual eldering." There are several paths one may take in eldering. First, however, the authors confront the "conscious transit of death." In part three of the book the authors discuss "Spirual Eldering and Social Transformation." This section includes mentoring and elders as healers of family, community, and Gaia-the living Earth.
Finally, an appendix is provided which includes exercises for sages in training.
If you are retired or facing retirement and are at a loss for how to lead a productive life in your 'golden years' your time would be well spent in looking this book over.
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Rabbi Menachem Cohen on November 9, 2000
Format: Paperback
My own spiritual journey was faltering when I met Reb Zalman and bought this book. It was his humor and wisdom that helped me back onto the path. Now I go towards old age with a sense of purpose and a cheerfulness. I feel that this book was a personal invitation (to all of us) to join the tribal council of elders. I am currently rereading the book and again it is strengthening my resolve to take on the role of elder in my community.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Marion Foerster on June 29, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
From Age-Ing to Sage-Ing has been a personal inspiration for me. Being recently retired, it has shown me that it's important to take all of the knowledge and wisdom that I have gained and give it back to the younger generation. If all of us healthy elders volunteered some of our wisdom in the workforce, our Social Security crisis would be greatly diminished. This is a wonderfully timely book with an important message.
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