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From the Ashes of Angels: The Forbidden Legacy of a Fallen Race Paperback – September 1, 2001


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Bear & Company; 1ST edition (September 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 187918172X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1879181724
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (52 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #130,287 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A fascinating and in-depth look at . . . how actual events inevitably evolve into the stuff of indecipherable legend as centuries pass." (Sandy Moss, The Daily Courier, June 2, 2002)

"An exciting and original intellectual quest . . . important new facts concerning the mysterious origins of human civilization." (Graham Hancock, author of Fingerprints of the Gods)

"A magnificently researched work; its startling conclusions will undoubtedly reverberate over the coming decades." (Nigel Jackson, author of The Horned Piper)

"A fascinating piece of research which does much to bring the biblical world of Eden back into the historical spotlight . . . a major contribution to the study of the genesis of civilization." (David Rohl, Egyptologist and author of A Test of Time)

"Tracking down angels both heavenly and fallen, Collins’s detective work takes him through entire libraries. . . . His conclusion is that we humans are not the first race to live on the planet. Reading books like this one can be as much fun as reading Conan Doyle or Agatha Christie." (Barbara Ardinger, Whole Life Times, May 2002)

From the Back Cover

ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS / MYTHOLOGY

“An exciting and original quest...important new facts concerning the mysterious origins of human civilization.”
--Graham Hancock, author of Fingerprints of the Gods

“A magnificently researched work; its startling conclusions will undoubtedly reverberate over the coming decades.”
--Nigel Jackson, author of The Horned Piper

“A fascinating piece of research which does much to bring the biblical world of Eden back into the historical spotlight...a major contribution to the study of the genesis of civilization.”
--David Rohl, Egyptologist and author of A Test of Time

Our mythology describes how beings of great beauty and intelligence, who served as messengers of God, fell from grace through pride. These angels, also known as Watchers, are spoken of in the Bible and other religious texts as lusting after human women, who lay with them and gave birth to giant offspring called Nephilim. Religious sources also record how these beings shared forbidden arts and sciences with humanity--a transgression that led to their destruction in the Great Flood.

Andrew Collins reveals that these angels, demons, and fallen angels were flesh-and-blood members of a race predating our own. He offers evidence that they lived in Egypt prior to the ancient Egyptians and built the Sphinx and other megalithic monuments. Following the cataclysms that accompanied the last Ice Age they left the region for what is now eastern Turkey where they lived in isolation before gradually establishing contact with the developing human societies of the Mesopotamian plains below. Humanity regarded these angels--described as tall, white-haired beings with viperlike faces and burning eyes--as gods and their realm the paradise wherein grew the tree of knowledge. Andrew Collins demonstrates how the legends behind the fall of the Watchers echo the faded memory of actual historical events and that the legacy they have left humanity is one we can afford to ignore only at our own peril.

ANDREW COLLINS has spent more than twenty years investigating the relationship between paranormal phenomena, ancient sites, and the human mind. He is also the widely heralded author of Gods of Eden and Gateway to Atlantis. He lives in England.

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Customer Reviews

Very well researched and very well written book.
Marek J. Sawula
In this respect, Collins presents a very interesting take on the ancient legends concerning the Watchers and the Nephilim that few other authors ever consider.
Craig Hines
Probably the best book I have read on this subject.
Dee Macedonio

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

43 of 46 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on December 11, 2004
Format: Paperback
First and foremost, you have to be able to put aside what is considered to be mainstream thoughts and beliefs about archeology, human evolution, and the beginnings of this world to even begin to enjoy Mr. Collins' fine work. His work is set up to help you question, think and most importantly, challenge the norm. From the Ashes of Angels is no different. Admittedly, some of the chapters repeat previously mentioned information, but it's organized to help even the most ingrained, stubborn believer in seeing that there is more to our past than what's found in the history books. In fact, history books don't even cover 1/10th of the truth. Remember, history is written by the victor's and I believe that most of Collins' work sees both sides, presents it in a concise and easy to follow package and allows the reader to make his/her own mind up. As for me, the proof is all there, you only have to open your eyes to it. As for those who believe that this book, or any of Collins' books aren't worth the read, you're entitled to your opinion. However, back up your comments with some actual proof or facts. I'm tired of reading reviews that only blame the author when the reader is not willing to see past their own bias to expand their knowledge base. So reader beware, you will have to put aside your belief system and reach beyond what you already know to truly grasp this work. Isn't that what learning is all about? You have the choice to believe in what's written, but walk into it with heart and mind open. Andrew Collins doesn't disprove the bible or the stories therein as some of the reviews have alluded to, but rather helps validate events in the book. Collins does go one step farther by showing how folklore and oral traditions twist facts over time.Read more ›
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55 of 60 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Barrett on February 27, 2002
Format: Paperback
Overall, this is a well researched book. I suppose one might call this genre "investigative mythology". I particularly found memorable his assertion that St. Augustine thought the Book of Enoch was too old and thus should be excluded from canonical texts. What kept this book from getting a fifth star were several weaknesses. For example, the author's next-to-last chapter was essentially a non-academic emotional diatribe against organized religion. Additionally, his conjecture about the findings of large malformed human skulls being proof of another and superior race is essentially that, merely conjecture. Modern DNA analysis might sort out whether these are congenital malformations as a result of incestuous inbreeding or a subspecies of Homo sapiens. However, his efforts at bringing together various and disparate mythologies into a cohesive hypothesis about a lost and oft maligned race is quite entertaining and provocative. Still, I highly recommed it for your home library.
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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Takis Tz. on June 3, 2003
Format: Paperback
For those familiar with the explorations of alternative archaelogists the word "nephilim" should be no new acquaintance. The debate about their origin though seems to carry on and on.
Andrew Collins has delivered here an extraordinary book when one considers the painstaking research he's invested in it. I do feel however, that he's probably arrived to the wrong conclusions.
Collins professes that the Nephilim were the giant offspring of a preancient gigantic humanlike being that mated with humans and his research focuses on the Watchers (the Nephilim's ancestors) and the territories they lived. Remarkably, if not shockingly, he arrives at the conclusion that the Watchers originated somewhere in ancient Kazahkstan but he fails to explain their strange (to put it very mildly) features: burning, sometimes red eyes, massive in size compared to humans and with very possibly "special qualities, which again humans did not and do not, possess.
What makes this book great -whether you agree or not with its conclusions- is that the trek it takes you for is full of priceless revelations and a plethora of incredible facts ranging from Asia to eastern Europe to northern Africa, revelations and facts that will put certain questions in a new perspective while they leave others still open.
I, for one, dont agree with the final analysis of "From the Ashes of Angels" but was astounded with what i read in it.There were certain things i read for the very first time allthough i spend quite a lot of my reading on alternative archaelogy. That should speak for itself.
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31 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Christine Menendez on April 24, 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I would rate this book a five on information and a one on its structure. I'm reading it now for the second time, and having just as much trouble as the first. There is just so much in here, and too much is, I think, rendered in the main text rather than being subjugated as footnotes. The result is a loss of integrity due to these diversions in the text which, at least on my part, leads to confusion.Too many tangents! There is just so much in this book, so many interesting ideas and conceptions and a wealth of history that despite the difficulty I am pursuing it with vigor and writing my own chapter summaries and marginal notes. I would most certainly recommend this book to those interested in this subject, but be warned that it is hard-going. If the authors happen to read this review I would ask them to please, please, write chapter summaries as does Graham Phillips!
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