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From the Barrel of a Gun: The United States and the War against Zimbabwe, 1965-1980 Hardcover – June 25, 2001

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Hardcover, June 25, 2001

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Editorial Reviews

Review

Horne's book is to be recommended, and should be required reading for those with an interest in U.S.-Zimbabwe relations, Pan-Africanism, and also the nationalist and post-nationalist historiography of Southern Africa.--H-Net



This book is an excellent reference tool.--Choice

Review

In the tradition of Walter Rodney, Gerald Horne brilliantly writes black history in a comparative and Pan-African context. From the Barrel of a Gun provides the best historical study to date on the African struggle to overthrow the white minority rule in Zimbabwe. Horne convincingly documents the central role of the United States in delaying the decolonization of Zimbabwe. This is an impressive and comprehensive study of modern African political history.--Manning Marable, Columbia University

|This timely and brilliant contribution from Professor Horne breaks new ground in the depth and sophistication of its analysis. From the Barrel of a Gun takes the reader from the old American West to the last frontier of colonialism in Zimbabwe, viewing events through the lens of race, gender, and international intrigue.--Brenda Gayle Plummer, University of Wisconsin-Madison

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; 1 edition (June 25, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807825891
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807825891
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.4 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #13,543,345 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By T. Jenkins on March 10, 2009
Format: Hardcover
The preceding reviews show the depth of the divide between truth and fiction. History and propaganda, right and left without regard in every instance to the lives which have been affected by the actions on both sides. Personally this book is a jewel if for no other reason, than the author makes the reader privy to thoughts, ideals and a perspective which is not fomented in fear, slanted by political ideology or in defense of racial or nationalistic purview. Unfortunately the only acceptable word or view of Mugabe and Zimbabwe seems to be the one which paints a picture of him as an unquestioned despot, driven by a maniacal urge to defy authority, and yet those who unequivocally support this position rarely bother to give so much as a cursory glance at the facts as they pertain to equal rights or equal treatment. There are more than enough right/west slanted books on Africa and Mugabe to fill a thousand libraries yet and still it bothers them to no end when a coherently crafted work such as this dares to challenge their childish world view. Mr. Horne's work is a well-balanced alternative to the mountain of biased writings which are out there.
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By Rich Kennedy on April 4, 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A good read. Gave me information I needed and confirmed some that I already knew.
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8 of 15 people found the following review helpful By rodog63jr on October 3, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Gerald Horne shows clearly how the U.S.A. encouraged the White Population to defy international law and set up Rhodesia. It show the tragic role American mercenaries played in maintaining this state.
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4 of 9 people found the following review helpful By thomas bleming on June 18, 2011
Format: Paperback
This book basically is a condemnation of the European (White) people, specifically the Rhodesian and the white minority government which was led by Ian Smith, Rhodesia's prime minister.
The author's book looks in another direction when he describes the so-called "liberation" fighters of Robert Mugabe and Joshua Nkomo, giving the reader the view that they were somehow anything but the murderous butchers that they were/are.
The author leaves out the reality of just what has become of this once prosperous part of Africa (Rhodesia), once called the "breadbasket of Africa", now the disorganized, corrupt and starving black despot ruled nation of Zimbabwe, where sickness,starvation and death hangs over each and everyone of it's black citizens.
I lived in Rhodesia (1975) and saw for myself how the black Africans were treated. They were coming into Rhodesia,from all over southern Africa to work and live a rather good life under the white minority in charge of running the government.
While in Rhodesia I met a number of black Rhodesians who were quite prosperous and who had made quite a large amount of money , of course Mr.Horne makes little or no reference to the bulgenoning black middle class, which existed in Rhodesia, rather he harranges about mostly make believe "abuses" that needed to be addressed.
by guerrilla warfare and terrorism.
The author writes a very shallow and limited accont about the thousands of foreign volunteers, mostly ex-military, who came to Rhodesia, to fight the communist terrorist insurgency.
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15 of 28 people found the following review helpful By pnotley@hotmail.com on February 2, 2002
Format: Paperback
This book detailing the liberation struggle has an unusual structure. It starts off with a chapter "Toward Zimbabwe," which raises three of Horne's themes in this book: racism, anti-communism, and the problem of "whiteness." It is often repetitive and padded and is the least interesting chapter in this book. The next chapter looks at the links between the Rhodesian government and its supporters in the United States. The third chapter looks at the ideological support of the white minority regime, concentrating on missionaries, anti-communist supporters and sexual violence. The fourth actually offers a summary of American diplomacy towards Rhodesia from the Unilateral Declaration of Independence in 1965 to Zimbabwe's independence. The fifth looks at business relations with the white minority regime. The sixth looks at the mercenary scum that came mostly from the United States to ravage Rhodesia and the indulgence they received from the American government. The seventh looks at links between African-Americans and the liberation struggle. The conclusion looks at modern Zimbabwe and the often pernicious effect Rhodesian mercenaries have had, mostly on South Africa.
Horne, of course, is thoroughly in favour of the liberation struggle and is properly angry towards those who obstructed and delayed independence. Yet this is a mixed book. One point to start off with is that Horne is affiliated with the Communist Party of the United States of America. Even by the standards of world communist party leaderships, the American party is notorious for its dogmatic, simple-minded, philistine and uncritical attitude. Many intelligent and thoughtful people have joined the American Communist Party and the vast majority have left (or been expelled from) it in disgust at its dishonesty.
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