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From the Earth to the Moon (Bantam Classics) Mass Market Paperback – May 1, 1993

ISBN-13: 978-0553214208 ISBN-10: 0553214209

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From the Earth to the Moon (Bantam Classics) + Journey to the Center of the Earth (Dover Thrift Editions) + The Mysterious Island (Wordsworth Classics)
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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam Classics (May 1, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553214209
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553214208
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 4.2 x 6.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #331,262 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Novel by Jules Verne, published as De la Terre a la Lune (1865) and also published as The Baltimore Gun Club and The American Gun Club. Although the novel was subtitled Trajet direct en 97 heures 20 minutes ("Direct Passage in Ninety-Seven Hours and Twenty Minutes"), the actual journey to the Moon was depicted in the book's sequel, Autour de la Lune (1870; Round the Moon). From the Earth to the Moon concerns a group of obsessive American Civil War veterans, members of the Baltimore Gun Club, who conceive the idea of creating an enormous cannon in order to shoot a "space-bullet" to the Moon from a site in Florida. -- The Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Language Notes

Text: English, French (translation) --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

The text is unreadable at points; various spelling errors litter the book.
Namo
Verne's ability to imagine science at the next level, and predict its direction in the future are what make all of his novels such respected masterpieces.
Chip Hunter
I now have to find a copy of the second book, so I urge others to save yourselves time and buy both stories in one package.
Daniel Jolley

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Norman M. Wolcott on June 10, 2006
Format: Paperback
This translation, one of the Barnes and Noble "Classics Editions", is the 1874 English translation by Edward Roth, a Philadelphia school-teacher. In no sense a translation, it is more a parody or retelling of the French original with many embelishments and additions by the author. The editor is Aaron Parett, an English professor from Montana. In an appendix the editor mentions that for furthur reading one might try the complete translation by Walter James Miller, "The Annotated Jules Verne: From the Earth to the Moon" published by Crowell: 1978 and reprinted by Gramercy: 1995. (In reading reviews, make sure the review applies to this ISBN: 07060765197)
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By R. D. Allison (dallison@biochem.med.ufl.edu) on June 4, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is a prophetic, both scientifically and socially, novel by Jules Verne that was first published in 1865. Verne was a satiric critic whose novel strongly hints at the future military industrial complex. This story depicts a club of artillery experts, the Baltimore Gun Club, bemoaning the end of the U. S. Civil War. The President of the Club, Impey Barbicane, comes up with a new project: a cannon shot to the moon. The idea for having passengers comes from a Frenchman. Most of the novel is concerned with the preparations for the launch which occurs at the end of the book. The story continues in Verne's sequel, "Round the Moon" (1870). It's amazing how many things Verne correctly predicted. Verne was perhaps the first author who attempts to make his novels agree with the science known at his time, although there are still mistakes. Verne is also making a number of political points as well in comparing the freedom observed in the U. S. and the real lack of such freedom in France of the 1860s. Readers should also note that Walter James Miller has provided an annotated edition of this novel in 1978 that is excellent.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Jolley HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 28, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
While I naturally have long admired Jules Verne for his outstanding scientific vision and prodigious talent as a writer, I really had no idea that he could also write in such an entertaining and humorous fashion as revealed in this short novel. My memories of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea consist to a large degree of stretches of pages devoted to pure scientific language that could be hard to get through, but this book is an easy read full of action and laugh-out-loud commentary. Don't get me wrong, though--the science is here, and Verne goes into a lot of details concerning the project from conception to reality, walking us through all of the steps involved in constructing the cannon and its projectile. Surely, though, Verne knew that the very idea of launching men to the moon via a superhuge cannon was not really an idea that could work; as such, he lets the story and especially his characterizations of the main players in the drama, take center stage over the science. What we end up with is a study of sorts of the American character, a tribute to the power of imagination and dreaming, the glorification of science, and a very funny story about some really amazing characters.
I can not begin to relate the number of truly humorous anecdotes and observations filling the pages of this story. Barbicane, J. T. Maston, and Michel Ardan are quite memorable characters, and their acts and exploits will entertain you to no end. Verne introduces subtle but hilarious remarks and observations throughout the entire book that will make you laugh out loud. If the idea of hard scientific theorizing has scared you away from Verne, pick this book up and be wholly entertained. I would recommend, though, that you pick up a copy that also contains the sequel, Round the Moon.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Norman M. Wolcott on June 12, 2006
Format: Hardcover
The original 1872 English translation by Rev. Lewis Page Mercier omits about 20% of the story, including all the science and mathematics which Verne included. This restored translation, uncredited, but listed in bibliographies as by Harald Salemson, is a restored version including the material which Mercier left out and correcting many of his blunders. This edition converts all of Verne's various units into English units and Fahrenheit degrees, thus destroying part of the original flavour of the book. Also the French expletives do not translate well into English equivalents. Long out of print, this 1970 edition is the first in the 19th century to do justice to the original French of Jules Verne. If you grew up with the original Mercier version, you may want to read this to see what you missed.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Michael J. Mazza HALL OF FAME on June 19, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Jules Verne's novel "From the Earth to the Moon" is the imaginative story of an attempt, made shortly after the U.S. Civil War, to send a projectile to the moon. This daring plan is masterminded by veteran artilleryman Impey Barbicane, president of the Baltimore Gun Club. The novel follows the progress and remarkable outcome of the venture.
"Earth. . .Moon" is a terrific adventure story and a pioneering classic of 19th century science fiction. It's also an affectionate satire of the United States and the American character as seen through Verne's eyes. Verne's witty writing had me laughing out loud throughout the book. And furthermore, the novel is about courage, loyalty, and faith in the ability of human beings to overcome incredible obstacles.
Verne populates his adventure tale with a number of likeable and memorably drawn characters. He cleverly mixes in real scientific data with his fantastic tale. He also establishes the book's literary genealogy early on with references to Locke's Moon Hoax and Edgar Allan Poe's story of Hans Pfaal.
I read this book in the Lowell Bair translation, which is published as a Bantam Classic. "Earth. . .Moon" is suspenseful and exciting; it's also surprisingly poignant and ultimately inspiring. It's an enduring masterpiece by one of the 19th century's great visionary geniuses.
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