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From the Earth to the Moon (Four Disc Collector's Edition)


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DVD 4-Disc Version
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Product Details

  • Actors: Tom Hanks, Nick Searcy, Lane Smith, David Andrews, Daniel Hugh Kelly
  • Format: AC-3, Box set, Color, Dolby, Dubbed, Full Screen, Subtitled, NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 5.1), Spanish (Dolby Digital 1.0)
  • Subtitles: English, French, Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 4
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Hbo Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: November 10, 1998
  • Run Time: 639 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (433 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 0783114222
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #151,575 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "From the Earth to the Moon (Four Disc Collector's Edition)" on IMDb

Special Features

  • 30-minute "HBO" first look featurette
  • Special effects featurette
  • 13 TV spots
  • A virtual tour of the solar system
  • 3-D models of the ships
  • Mission objectives
  • Kennedy's speech
  • Timeline of the space missions
  • The history of the moon
  • Bonus DVD-Rom disc "The ROM side of the Moon"

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Produced with the cooperation of NASA, we follow the course of the great American dream is it becomes reality through the voyages of the Apollo astronauts in their mission to place a man on the moon. Powerfully told as never before, these are the stories of the men, women and children, who lived breathed, and manufactured from the power of human will one of the greatest achievements in the history of man.

Amazon.com

Originally broadcast in April and May of 1998, the epic miniseries From the Earth to the Moon was HBO's most expensive production to date, with a budget of $68 million. Hosted by executive producer Tom Hanks, the miniseries tackles the daunting challenge of chronicling the entire history of NASA's Apollo space program from 1961 to 1972. For the most part, it's a rousing success. Some passages are flatly chronological, awkwardly wedging an abundance of factual detail into a routine dramatic structure. But each episode is devoted to a crucial aspect of the Apollo program. The cumulative effect is a deep and thorough appreciation of NASA's monumental achievement. With the help of a superlative cast, consistent writing, and a stable of talented directors, Hanks has shared his infectious enthusiasm for space exploration and the inspiring power of conquering the final frontier.

NASA's complete participation in the production lends to its total authenticity, right down to the use of NASA equipment, launch locations, and even spacecraft. The re-creation of the lunar landscape is almost as impressive as the real thing and is further enhanced by the use of helium balloons to lighten the actors playing moon-walking astronauts. (These and other backstage details are revealed in the "making of" featurette, along with a wealth of supplemental materials, on a bonus disc in the miniseries' DVD package.) With a fictional, Walter Cronkite-like TV reporter (Lane Smith) serving as the dramatic link for all 12 episodes, this ambitious production may not be a great work of art. But as a generous and definitive example of nonfiction drama, it's full of the same kind of awe, inspiration, and humanity that led to "one giant leap" in the all-too-short history of 20th-century space exploration. --Jeff Shannon

Customer Reviews

Very well done and acted.
M. Monestier
The entire video was shot on video for HBO but still looks great, special effects are as good as in any movie and for the DVD, excellent 5.1 sound is used.
K. Musser
The mix of real footage and amazingly created ones add to its real life/documentary spirit.
S. Hassan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

292 of 297 people found the following review helpful By Amanda Bartels on October 5, 2005
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
From the Earth to the Moon: Signature Edition (2005)

I don't intend to review the content of this DVD set as it has been covered in great detail by many hundreds already. If you love top-class historical drama and enjoyed Apollo 13, you probably know about the quality of this miniseries already. My rating for the miniseries itself is 9.5 out of 10.

This is a short review to point out the differences between the 2000 4-Disc box set and the 2005 Signature Edition 5-disc box set.

In case you have already got the 2000 DVD set in your collection and are wondering whether to update it to the 2005 edition, here are the differences:

Firstly, there are 5 discs instead of 4, but NO difference in content. No extra scenes, documentaries or commentary. The original DVD-Rom Disc 4 has been re-authored to play on your DVD player in the lounge room. This makes a lot of the content immediately accessible instead of having to search for it on the net, but the interactivity is gone. For me that's small loss as I didn't get much out of the games etc anyway.

Secondly, the entire set has been remastered in DTS and Widescreen (1.85:1). Now this sounds like manna from heaven, but unfortunately only the audio remastering is really worth spending any extra dollars on. The sound is crisp, clear and beautifully mixed and the liftoffs etc come booming out of your home theatre system like you were there at the Cape.

But the widescreen - well, sadly it just doesn't enhance the original viewing experience. It's evident that HBO produced the original series in 1.33:1 for tv and have merely re-jigged and adapted that ratio for the modern proliferation of widescreen plasma television sets. There is no extra data.
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331 of 340 people found the following review helpful By Angela Mitchell VINE VOICE on August 9, 2000
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
First off, if I could give this miniseries 10, 20, a zillion stars, I would. Amazon just didn't let me count high enough.
So let me get ahold of myself long enough to tell you to run, run, run and get this DVD set now, if you haven't already. "From the Earth to the Moon" is one of the most unique and engrossing (as well as gorgeously produced) miniseries I've ever seen -- 12 hours of moving, dramatic, gripping, frightening, and ultimately completely inspiring entertainment. As a kid born in the late sixties, I missed the moon race (and I'm still ticked about it). But this literally perfect 12-episode miniseries makes me feel as if I've been there too -- from the tragedy of Apollo 1 to the triumphs and near-misses of the ensuing missions, to the vastly underappreciated final Apollo 16 and 17 missions. (As one character in the film laments, "We stopped going up just when we were getting really good at it.")
Those of you who might have avoided this because it's "history" -- let me reassure you right now that it's as gripping as any drama you'll see in or out of a theatre. This isn't just history painstakingly created by some of those who were there -- it's also just plain incredible, suspenseful, joyful entertainment.
And for those of you who saw it on HBO, the DVD set is well worth the price, even if you'd already taped it.
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190 of 200 people found the following review helpful By Freddy Flibble on September 25, 2005
Format: DVD
First let me start by saying this is one of the finest movies I have ever seen. I can watch it over and over again. I like this series so much that even though I bought and own the first DVD set, I just had to buy the signature series. The reason I bought the signature series was because it says it is in 16:9 aspect ratio unlike the first set which is conventional 4:3. I thought to myself "they must have filmed it in 16:9".

When I played the first disc it looked strange. So when I compared the two sets, I saw that the way they got the 16:9 was by zooming into the 4:3 video which essentially lops off some of the top and bottom of the picture. This has disappointed me. When you buy or rent a movie that has been converted from 16:9 there is a message that says, "This film has been modified from the original to fit your television". Well it would have been nice if this set said, "This film has been modified to fit your 16:9 television".

I am a victim of clever marketing. I am disappointed that Tom Hanks would let something like this happen with one of his products. He has a fantastic reputation. I am disappointed.
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48 of 50 people found the following review helpful By Max Peck on March 11, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
HBO has done a superb job in telling the story of "the most hazardous and dangerous and greatest adventures on which mankind has ever embarked." - JFK. With a cast of hundreds and a staggering budget of close to 70 million, Tom Hanks and HBO have woven together stories from the Apollo program into one 12-episode miniseries.
The first episode, "Can We Do This?," begins with the early years of American space exploration. Alan Shepard's heart stopping Freedom 7 flight is skillfully portrayed and Ed White's first Gemini spacewalk is seen. It really is a great beginning. "Apollo 1" gets right to the point. Within 5 minutes after the start of the episode the fire occurs. Most of the rest of the episode chronicles the investigation with the Apollo 204 Review Board and the clash between Harrison Storms and Joe Shea. It's got a really neat ending, probably the best of the series. "We Have Cleared the Tower" follows the Apollo 7 crew training all the way up to the launch as seen by a documentary crew filming the mission. If you want to know what it's like before a mission, this is the episode for you. "1968" I honestly thought was the worst episode. A lot of it is just a bunch of stock news footage from '68 and it keeps switching from color to those annoying black and white shots. However, this episode survives because later on it has an excellent scene as the Apollo 8 crew witnesses the first earthrise seen by humans. The episode also has some great in-flight scenes while the crew is in lunar orbit. "Spider" is by far one of the best. It has a good story mixed with a little dose of humor. It's really interesting seeing all the work that went into the lunar module and the Apollo 9 flight. This one also has a great ending.
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