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From Housewife to Heretic: One woman's spiritual awakening and her excommunication from the Mormon church Paperback – October 1, 1989

ISBN-13: 978-1877617010 ISBN-10: 1877617016

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 415 pages
  • Publisher: Wildfire Books (October 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1877617016
  • ISBN-13: 978-1877617010
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,445,093 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

On that note, I found Sonia's book to be a delightful read.
"camnemdvs"
Obviously a controversial book by a controversial figure, this book is nevertheless fascinating reading for anyone interested in the LDS Church and feminism.
Steven H. Propp
I personally think that most men are simply oblivious to the adverse effects of patriarchy and don't honestly intend to insult women.
TinaM

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

53 of 58 people found the following review helpful By TinaM on April 7, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If I could I would give this book 3 ˝ stars. Johnson is a decent (albeit verbose) writer, and her story is gripping. Once you pick up the book it is hard to put it down. Though she occasionally tries to explain Mormon colloquialisms and customs in layman's terms for non-Mormons, she writes from a profoundly Mormon experience, and I think it would be hard for a non-Mormon to fully appreciate the cultural subtleties in some of her stories.

Pros: Johnson's writing is illuminating. I was surprised at how something as simple as putting the shoe on the other foot made me consider in a new light traditions I had taken for granted. E.G., What if male missionaries could not baptize the people they converted and had to ask a woman to do the baptizing for them? How would men feel if the Church openly worshipped Heavenly Mother but only rarely spoke of the existence of a Heavenly Father in hushed and demurred tones? How would single men react to the Relief Society patronizing them with a speech assuring them that female leaders knew that some of their hearts yearned to be married and that if they were not fortunate enough to marry and sire children in this life they would have the opportunity in the hereafter, contingent upon their righteousness? Anyone with half a brain would concede that men would not like it one bit! Neither does Johnson; neither do I.

Cons: Johnson suspects sinister motives of most men in and out the Church, but considering the conspiring cabal that worked to excommunicate her, who could blame her? I personally think that most men are simply oblivious to the adverse effects of patriarchy and don't honestly intend to insult women.
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35 of 39 people found the following review helpful By "camnemdvs" on May 5, 2004
Format: Hardcover
First of all, to everyone who deems it necessary to attack the author of this book: shame on you. This is a place for reviews on the BOOK, not the author.
On that note, I found Sonia's book to be a delightful read. It's nice to finally read Mormon literature from a woman's perspective. Although a bit outdated, I felt that I could relate to most of what she wrote (both concerning the Mormon church, and not). She did get a bit out of hand with the "labeling" of ALL men. I'm sure that from her experiences, men have been less-than-human. Not all men are that way, though.
Not once does she attack the doctrine of the religion; only the hypocricy of most of the members [with whom she came into contact]. Her story may seem a bit exaggerated, but I don't believe it is. I went ahead and did some research on Sonia, the ERA, etc., and I found her book to be dead on the facts.
I've found myself treating Sonia's book like I would a history book. I've learned things about the Mormon church that I never even knew of when I was a member; all of which rings of some form of truth.
If you're looking for an interesting, compelling book based on one woman's experience within the Mormon church, you needn't look any further.
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58 of 68 people found the following review helpful By Anise on February 5, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I originally read this book when I was ten years old, and a Mormon. God only knows how I actually got ahold of it. I suppose I didn't really know what to make of it at the time. Each time I have read it since, it has more resonance. Most people simply have no idea of what really goes on in the Mormon church. They think it's a nice, sunny, family-oriented religion. They do not know that the ideas of natural inferiority of women and superiority of men are integral parts of the religion, perhaps THE most integral. They do not know that African-Americans were not admitted into the Aaronic priesthood until 1979. They do not know that men are still allowed to store away multiple wives for the afterlife (and that sounds bizarre because it is.) Even many converts do not necessarily know these things. Sonia does come across as bitter and angry throughout much of this book, I agree. But if we don't get angry about certain things, exactly what are we on this earth for? Now, more than ever, this classic book reminds us that there is a time to be angry. I really wonder what Sonia is doing now, and I hope to hear her voice on the current political situation.
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38 of 46 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 1, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This books rings so true to me. Her experiences as a Mormon directly correspond to what I have seen in the Mormon church - the belittling and disempowermemt of women - amounting almost to unconcern with what women really want or need. After her feminist awakening, Sonia was completely non-tolerant of being treated as less-than-human. This is where she ran into trouble with the Mormon church - who basically wanted her to sit down and shut up (i.e. follow the prophet blindly, not report church hypocrisy to the press - specifically in their attempts to cover up the fact that (male) church leaders were organizing Mormon women to lobby against the ERA and then requiring the women to say that they were just concerned citizens - not an organized group). The depths to which her church leaders sank (blantantly lying; attempting to discredit her by saying she was insane, mentally unstable, merely publicity-hungry; using women to front for male decisions) are depressing but completely believable.
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