Qty:1
  • List Price: $22.50
  • Save: $2.25 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it tomorrow, April 17? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by QuibbleBooks
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Appears to be unread. Shows the mildest signs of storage. Free of remainder marks. Professionally packed and shipped. Eligible for FREE Super Saver Shipping.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

From My Highest Hill: Carolina Mountain Folks Paperback


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$9.95 $90.00
Paperback
"Please retry"
$20.25
$16.25 $2.88 $19.95
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Univ Tennessee Press; 1 edition (September 30, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1572330201
  • ISBN-13: 978-1572330207
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.2 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,918,620 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Book Description

In From My Highest Hill, a long-overlooked masterpiece of American literature, Olive Tilford Dargan captures with affection and uncanny accuracy the character traits, attitudes, folkways, and dialect of the people who lived in the Great Smoky Mountains during the early years of the twentieth century. First published in 1925 as Highland Annals, the story cycle was extensively revised before it was reissued under its current title in 1941. The second edition included for the first time fifty striking illustrations by photographer Bayard Wootten.

Among the delightful characters who come to life in the book are Serena, who "'always take[s] the gait [she] can keep,'" and Sam, who has "'always got duck-oil on his tongue.'" In her moving and amusing encounters with her highland neighbors, Dargan's narrator, an outsider and a woman alone, learns many valuable lessons from them and gradually wins their acceptance and trust.

The republication of From My Highest Hill is comparable in significance to the rediscovery of Kate Chopin's Awakening in the 1960s and of Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God in the 1970s. This edition includes an introduction that describes Olive Dargan's life and literary career and assesses From My Highest Hill from a critical perspective. It also contains an afterword that provides biographical information about Bayard Wootten and commentary on her illustrations.

The Author: Olive Tilford Dargan (1869–1968), a Kentucky native who lived for two decades in the mountains of western North Carolina, published many critically acclaimed works of poetry, drama, and prose fiction. Her 1932 radical feminist novel,Call Home the Heart, was reprinted by the Feminist Press in 1983.

The Editors:  Anna Shannon Elfenbein teaches classes in American fiction and film and women's studies at West Virginia University. She is the author of Women on the Color Line: Evolving Stereotypes and the Writings of George Washington Cable, Grace King, Kate Chopin and an editor of Engendering the Word: Feminist Essays in Psychosexual Poetics.

Jonathan Morrow is a doctoral candidate at West Virginia University and has contributed essays to Feminist Writers, The Encyclopedia of Novels Into Films, and the journal Art Papers.

About the Author

Anna Shannon Elfenbein teaches classes in American fiction and film and women's studies at West Virginia University. She is the author of Women on the Color Line: Evolving Stereotypes and the Writings of George Washington Cable, Grace King, Kate Chopin and an editor of Engendering the Word: Feminist Essays in Psychosexual Poetics.

Jonathan Morrow is a doctoral candidate at West Virginia University and has contributed essays to Feminist Writers, The Encyclopedia of Novels Into Films, and the journal Art Papers.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Clark Mackey on April 29, 2009
Format: Paperback
This book is a wonderful telling of rural Appalachian stories in the same vein as Horace Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders - though I liked it better than Kephart. The author, Olive Tilford Dargan, based her stories on her own experiences living in the region and was aware of Kephart's work. Where Kephart occasionally engages in cliche and negative stereotypes of women, Dargan tells stories that feel original and highlight dynamic female characters. The book is a delight with stories that make it hard to put down - very well crafted. I'm surprised to see it doesn't have any reviews.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Carolina Kat: I'm sorry, but you are very much mistaken. My grandmother is in one of the photos (with her grandfather, the "judge", fishing) and remembers Olive Tilford Dargan VERY well. Dargan spent years living right next door to all of the folks that appear in the photos and the same folks that told her the stories that inspired the stories in the book. My grandmother can name most everyone in the stories (and the photos); however, she said that Dargan changed ALL of the names.

Anyway, long story short (no pun intended), according to my grandmother, the stories are based upon real events and the lives of the folks that lived there. And, unless you lived up in the rural Appalachians during the early 20th Century, I don't think you can dispute her claim.

Now, the one thing that her and I will grant you is that Dargan's attempt to write in the local dialect was a really bad idea and DID offend a number of folks (believe it or not, most southerners don't think they have an accent!) So, while most of my family would say that she got the content and "spirit" of the stories correct in the book, the attempt at scribing the 'dialect' was a really bad idea.

Personally, I don't feel comfortable commenting on much since my time in the area where Dargan lived when she wrote the book (Almond, NC) was only 1974-1992 (my childhood.) However, based upon stories that *I* heard from my family members, my interactions with older people as a kid, and my extensive genealogy research, I think that the book is a lot more "real" than you realize.

Finally, I do want to be clear that the stories are, in essence, fiction. However, all characters and the stories themselves were based upon REAL people.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Carolina Kat on January 6, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A narrow and terrible book. The author engaged in an endeavor to understand a culture to which she felt superior, obscuring from her any meaningful understanding of her subject. There is one great lesson in this book - objectivity is essential in understanding another culture - and this is a perfect example of what doesn't work. Reading this book is a waste of time intellectually, and sadly, an insult to mountain culture it purports to explain.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Search
ARRAY(0xa01c345c)