From a Native Daughter: Colonialism and Sovereignty in Hawaii (Latitude 20 Books) Rev Sub Edition

16 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0824820596
ISBN-10: 0824820592
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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this impassioned and provocative collection of 17 essays, Trask, a well-known activist, argues the case of indigenous Hawaiians, persons of Polynesian descent, who have been overwhelmed by the dominant culture. She puts the native Hawaiian experience in its historical context as one of colonialism, initiated by military invasion and sustained through military and economic occupation and oppression. She also touches on the environmental devastation wrought by development on a beautiful and fragile ecosystem, and on the "cultural prostitution" that occurs when native traditions become mere local color for swarms of tourists. Trask examines the claims of Hawaiians to human rights and self-determination before international tribunals. This issue is given a larger frame of reference by a similar discussion of other Pacific island nations. The author convincingly documents continued racism directed at Hawaii's native inhabitants, including at the University of Hawaii where she teaches Hawaiian studies. Uncompromising yet never shrill, this volume is a welcome addition to the growing body of literature on indigenism, the movement for the rights of native people around the world.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"This book is so powerful, it will change the way you think about Hawaii, and all lands seized by force, forever.... A masterpiece."
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Product Details

  • Series: Latitude 20 Books
  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Univ of Hawaii Pr; Rev Sub edition (June 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0824820592
  • ISBN-13: 978-0824820596
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #109,174 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

43 of 52 people found the following review helpful By Samson K. Reiny on August 19, 2005
Format: Paperback
"From a Native Daughter" is very intelligently written with strong academic and historical references. Who can fault Trask for being so passionate and angered about Hawaii's wrongful past? For over 110 years, Hawaii has been seized and administered illegally by the United States. The native people have had their culture, their sovereignty, and their spirits taken away. She is demanding a right of sovereignty for this island nation that has been falling on deaf ears for generations.

There have been many interesting comments regarding this book that I've read and some are simply ignorant. No, Haunani Trask is not full Hawaiian but not very many are. One hundred years after Cook 'disovered' Hawaii, the population had been reduced 90% due to disease and cultural shock. There are maybe 5,000 pure Hawaiians left today, and most of them are so disenfranchised they cannot even think of deciding to write a book. Haunani speaks for these people who are powerless.

Another opinion is that her statements have little merit academically. The only revisionism occurring is the glossed tourist culture that is Hawaii today. And for anyone thinking that the wrong done to Hawaiians is not recognized (though very covertly), the Apology Bill signed by Clinton in 1993 displays the American government's fault in the illegal takeover. Interestingly, from this APOLOGY, all programs aimed to serve Hawaiians are being called racist and unfair for non-Hawaiians. This is hyprocrisy in the highest.

Haunani Trask is a racist? Her words are strong and no one can doubt her forceful style. Her political incorrectness is a reflection of how this government has treated the Hawaiians.
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28 of 37 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 20, 2000
Format: Paperback
I read this book for an introductory Hawaiian Studies class, and my first thought was to try and find some of whatever the author was smoking. In general, Trask is much too radical for my tastes. But she makes lots of very good points. I was shocked to see her accusing Gawan Daws of racism. I checked the passage she referred to in Shoals of Time, and sure enough, I could see that the paragraph was definitely racially insensitive. This is a book that really makes you think about things you've lived with in Hawai`i all your life and never really noticed. Trask may be a wingnut, but you should read her book anyway.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Shirley K. Schulte on October 16, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a very informative book. You can certainly learn a heat deal about the many challenges native Hawaiians face. Such beautiful people who have been wronged by so many for such a long time. A must read.
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24 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Mario on February 27, 2002
Format: Paperback
Trasks book is definetly worth reading. She has some wonderful critiques of the tourist industry and its effect on the economy,politics, and sustainability of Hawai'i. I also believe that Trask provides of very long over due and pertinent analization of the historic events that led to the occupation, overthrow, and takeover of the Hawai'ian Islands. In response to one of the reviewers, native Hawai'ians were friendly to you because they are paid to do so. To compare Trask to Hitler or David Duke is utterly ignorant and white backlash against a scholarly critique of white supremacy, imperialization, and colonization. The fact that Trask is not "100 %" Hawai'ian reminds us of the fact that the reason indigenous people are dying off is because of the colonial system that Trask critiques. On the other hand, I do believe that Trask leaves certain things to be desired. The diversity in opinions of various sovereignty groups in Hawai'i are all together left out and I have to disagree with her brand of extremist nationalism which tends to be not only exclusive but conservative as well. However, a critique of the colonialist exploitation of Hawai'i is often ignored and Trask fills in a void left by scholars and the general community alike.
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11 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer Bayne on April 1, 1998
Format: Hardcover
I discovered this book while doing research for a Cultural Pluralism class last year and was disapointed to find that it was out of print. After finding my own copy many fellow mainland Kama`aina's have wanted to review it as well because it has widened my once narrow perspective shared by most who are unaware of our important and rich heritage. I recommend this book (if you can find it) to any and all who desire to know about the true history of Hawai`i, our culture, the ill-effects of Colonialism, and the importance of Nationalism.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Robin L. Blattel on February 2, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great book! Informative and very interesting. Glad this book was required for a college course or I would never have read it!
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23 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Philip W. Stephenson on August 31, 2001
Format: Paperback
While on vacation in Hawai'i for the first time I had observed there were no Hawaiians except room service and grounds keepers. Most of the people I met were white people from Ohio. Something seemed completely at odds with what I expected.
I found a bookstore in search of a Hawaiian history book determined that it be written by a Hawaiian. I chose Professor Trask's book quite randomly based on the previous criteria. Her book was an explanation of what I was seeing first hand, vaudevillian luaus, crass commercialism and near total absence of indigenous people.
Once I begin reading it was difficult to stop and I was ready to go to war with christian missionaries and fat cat right-wing republicans. I have since sought to validate Trask's positions and every point she makes will foot and tick to a reliable source.
I am not Hawaiian and previously had no interest in this subject but this book was very well written and a call to action even for a middle class suburban haole such as myself.
The island of Maui was beautiful but I want return until Hawai'i is a sovereign nation and I am invited.
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