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From Potter's Field: Scarpetta 6 (Kay Scarpetta Series) [Kindle Edition]

Patricia Cornwell
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (232 customer reviews)

Kindle Price: $14.99
Sold by: Simon and Schuster Digital Sales Inc
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Book Description

#1 bestselling author Patricia Cornwell returns to the chilling world of gutsy medical examiner Kay Scarpetta in this suspense classic.

An unidentified nude female sits propped against a fountain in Central Park. There are no signs of struggle. When Dr. Kay Scarpetta and her colleagues Benton Wesley and Pete Marino arrive on the scene, they instantly recognize the signature of serial killer Temple Brooks Gault. Scarpetta, on assignment with the FBI, visits the New York City morgue on Christmas morning, where she must use her forensic expertise to give a name to the nameless—a difficult task. But as she sorts through conflicting forensic clues, Gault claims his next victim. He has infiltrated the FBI’s top secret artificial-intelligence system developed by Scarpetta’s niece, and sends taunting messages as his butchery continues, moving terrifyingly closer to Scarpetta herself.


Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Upon examining a dead woman found in snowbound Central Park, Kay Scarpetta immediately recognizes the grisly work of Temple Gault, a bold and brilliant killer from her past. Now she must hunt down a psychopath whose string of horrible murders is leading inexorably to his ultimate prey: Scarpetta herself. Even with the help of the FBI, Scarpetta knows the endgame is hers alone to play -- and it will be played on Gault's home turf, the subway tunnels beneath New York City.

From Publishers Weekly

Chief Medical Examiner Kay Scarpetta plays a tense cat-and-mouse game with a serial killer, an old enemy, in her sixth outing (following The Body Farm), and he has her badly rattled. The story begins as a rotten Christmas for Scarpetta: Temple Gault has struck again, leaving a naked, apparently homeless girl shot in Central Park on Christmas Eve; Scarpetta, as the FBI's consulting pathologist, is called in. Later, a transit cop is found shot in a subway tunnel, and, back home in Richmond, Va., the body of a crooked local sheriff is delivered to Scarpetta's own morgue by the elusive, brilliant Gault. The normally unflappable Scarpetta finds herself hyperventilating and nearly shooting her own niece. In the end, some ingenious forensic detective work and a visit to the killer's agonized family set up a high-tech climax back in the New York subway, which Gault treats as the Phantom of the Opera did the sewers of Paris. There's something faintly unconvincing about Gault (in a competitive field, it's tough to create a really horrific serial killer), and Scarpetta, stuck with her own family troubles and involved in a rather glum affair with a colleague, seems to be running low on energy. Still, this is a compelling, fast-moving tale, written in a highly compressed style, and only readers who know that Cornwell can do better are likely to complain. Literary Guild, Doubleday Book Club and Mystery Guild selections.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Product Details

  • File Size: 1230 KB
  • Print Length: 428 pages
  • Publisher: Scribner; 1st edition (August 2, 1995)
  • Sold by: Simon and Schuster Digital Sales Inc
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B001D202NO
  • Text-to-Speech: Not enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #20,770 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Meeting the Parents of a Serial Killer April 2, 2000
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Another great book from Madame Medical Investigator Author Patricia Cornwell. Always well-researched, this time the book causes Dr. Kay Scarpetta, Marino and of course, FBI Agent Benton Wesley to investigate the death of a frozen naked woman propped openly in Central Park. Their path leads them to the parents of a psychotic serial killer, one of whom can see nothing wrong about her son and the other parent who would only see his if pointing a shotgun at the son's face. The woman's identity is a shock, as is Scarpetta's handiness with a side-arm. A must-read!
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Format:Mass Market Paperback
...and with this book, she has done it yet again.
The book does not start off too well, with the sherrif Santa bit being a bit confusing for the first couple of pages. I didn't like it. And i thought i might be in for a disappointing Cornwellian offering.
My, was i WRONG.
This book is yet another stunner. She has definitely veered away from the cunningness and cleverness which inhabited her first three books. But she more than makes up for it with a chilling plot and one of the most cold and clinical serial killers i have eve read of. Essentially, this is a serial killer novel, and as that it not especially original. But it is nonetheless a good one.
Marino, Benton, Lucy and of course Kay are back again for another great read. Cornwell's writing is sharp and to the point, and keeps the you turning those pages. I can't really put my finger on a reason why, but from the first time i read a Cornwell book i feel in love with the way she writes. It's simply...wonderful. I can't get enough of it. It's no more literate than the next person's, but for some reason i just relish every sentence she writes.
The plot here is sometimes scatty and random (as was Cruel and Unusual) but here, she pulls it off a lot better. I tend not to like books full of random killings, without rhyme or reason (yoo hoo, James Patterson, author of Violets are Blue, i'm talking in particular about you.), but here i really did. The randomness is chilling, and Tenple Gault is a super villain, who curdles the blood. He is just so...hateable. You loathe him absolutely. Especially when you find out how he treats his sister. You just hate him even more. With every part of i wanted him to die, die, die. It is hard to conceieve of anyone so cruel and horrifically terrifying than him.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Life of the Chief Medical Examiner? May 14, 2003
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I am currently taking a murder mystery class at my college. I have not read many murder mysteries before this class. We have read a variety of novels for this class, with the most number of novels by one author being three. The one Patricia Cornwell novel our class read is "From Potter's Field." I very much enjoyed this novel, though I think it should be considered a thriller instead of a murder mystery. The novel also had some hard to believe aspects about it, which were difficult for the members of my class to look beyond.
Why should this novel be labeled a thriller and not a murder mystery? Well, the reader clearly knows who the murder is. Dr. Kay Scarpetta, the Chief Medical Examiner, has the feeling the murderer is her "nemesis," Temple Gault with plenty of reason. The only mysteries are for her to prove Gault is the murder, identify the first body of the girl, "Jane" and of course to find Gault, before he finds her. A thriller is also more appropriate because it had several moments that were extremely suspenseful, the kind that makes the hairs on your neck stand up. There is a section of the novel where there is a murder in Kay's office building and she believes the killer is still in the building. As she walks around the building, you expect Gault to jump out at any moment. There is also another section in which a trap is set for Gault in NYC's subway system. Not knowing whether or not he'll show up had me on the edge of my proverbial seat.
As much as I liked this novel, there were several things that irked me about it. A Chief Medical Examiner seems more like an office, administrative position than a really, REALLY hands on job. Kay almost takes on the role of a detective.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good but incomplete February 8, 2006
Format:Paperback
"Cruel and Unusual" was my first Scarpetta book, and when I looked on the jacket of "From Potter's Field" and saw that it would deal with Temple Gault again, I decided to read it next, hoping to see this killer get what he deserves.

Most of this book was pretty engrossing, even though I did have some gripes. Kay's affair with Benton is disappointing to me since she seems to pride herself on "doing the right thing." Lucy was insufferable in this one. She was younger in "Cruel and Unusual" and I could overlook her idiosyncracies, but she's older now and needs to get a grip - she almost seems to resent or dislike Kay at times but then turns around and loves her again. Also, Lucy's genius IQ and role as an FBI computer program writer who busts crime with her keyboard are beyond corny.

The best part IMO was the scene in the morgue, as others have said. I don't think I would have been able to put the book down if a tornado had ripped through my house while I was reading that part!

It is difficult to believe that a crazy guy high on cocaine most of the time could always be one step ahead of the police and FBI, brutally murdering people right under their noses and getting away with it.

But then the worst came. The ending. Wham, bam, it's over, with Temple Gault's fate implied but none of the juicy details I was hungering for. There wasn't even a page break - one second we're in the subway tunnels of New York, the next we're flying over Potter's Field. Huh?
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
Great character
Published 5 days ago by Dennis E. Dilworth
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Loved it.
Published 20 days ago by Mary Jo Bell
5.0 out of 5 stars positive
Thank you
Published 1 month ago by mary makkai
5.0 out of 5 stars From Potter's Field
A great read! Patricia Cornwell is extremely entertaining. I have enjoyed every book I have read by Patricia Cornwell. Read more
Published 1 month ago by JuJu
4.0 out of 5 stars series started out well. began to go downhill maybe around 6 or 7
started this series after reading the Temperance Brennan books by Reichs. They seemed to be similar and were. In the beginning. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Doctor Gail
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Very good Great story teller
Published 2 months ago by Gudrun Morgan
5.0 out of 5 stars Sent as stated. My only issue was I accidentally ...
Sent as stated. My only issue was I accidentally ordered the same book twice. I thought I selected something else.
Published 2 months ago by Takisha A Salley
5.0 out of 5 stars Always interesting!
I resisted these books for years and boy, I wished I hadn't P
. Cromwell is a phenomenal writer. I love ALL of her books
Published 2 months ago by Christine E. Ippolito
5.0 out of 5 stars Best One Yet
Cornwell has to be my favorite writer and Scarpetta my favorite mystery series. I can always count on these books to give me the chills with thrills, boggle my brain with a... Read more
Published 2 months ago by CC Thomas
4.0 out of 5 stars This is a good one. If you are a fan of Dan ...
I've finished 8 of the Scarpetta series. This is a good one. If you are a fan of Dan Brown you might like the series, although it's more violent than his books for the most part.
Published 2 months ago by rogo
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More About the Author

In 1990, Patricia Cornwell sold her first novel, Postmortem, while working at the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Richmond, Virginia. An auspicious debut, it went on to win the Edgar, Creasey, Anthony, and Macavity awards as well as the French Prix du Roman d'Aventure prize - the first book ever to claim all these distinctions in a single year.

Today, Cornwell's novels and now iconic characters, medical examiner Kay Scarpetta, her niece Lucy and fellow investigator Pete Marino, are known all over the world. Fox 2000 is actively developing a feature film about Kay Scarpetta. Beyond the Scarpetta series, Patricia has written a definitive account of Jack the Ripper's identity, cookbooks, a children's book, a biography of Ruth Graham, and two other fiction series based on the characters Win Garano and Andy Brazil.

Cornwell was born in Miami, grew up in Montreat, North Carolina, and now lives and works in Boston.

Visit the author's website at: www.patriciacornwell.com

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cornwell movies
On the cover of two of her books, it says the movie was being made about "From Potter's Field". But I've searched the internet over and can find nothing about a movie made.
Feb 8, 2007 by G. Campbell |  See all 4 posts
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