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From Red Hot to Monkey's Eyebrow: Unusual Kentucky Place Names Paperback – July 24, 1997

4.2 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

"A delightful discussion of over seventy of Kentucky's many unusual place names"―Filson Club History Quarterly

"Rennick's book should become a permanent fixture in the cars of those who like to vary from the multi-land highways and really see the state in which they are traveling."―Bowling Green Daily News

"I can imagine that if someone was really interested in understanding colorful town names, that he or she wouldn't make it across the breadth of Kentucky in several years. It would take that long to scope out the history of the names that catch our fancy. The good news: Rennick has done much of the dirty work for us."―Central Kentucky News Journal (Campbellsville)

"Each name has its own story to tell, if we are able to hear it and prepared to listen to it."―Journal of American Folklore

"Be sure to check out Nonesuch, Decoy, and definitely Bugtussle in this entertaining tour of outlandish place names."―Journal of the Jackson Purchase Historical Society

"This delightful paperback will support the study of Kentucky history, as well as units of folklore, and will appeal to researchers and browsers alike."―Library Lane

"They have a folk truth about them that needs recording as much as does the crystal pure fact. . . . delightfully narrated, we can be thankful that [Rennick] has finally decided to put his placename stories into print."―Names

"These anecdotes will bring a smile to those of us who have wondered why there aren't any stallions in Horse Cave."―Southern Living

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 96 pages
  • Publisher: University Press of Kentucky; First Edition edition (July 24, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0813109310
  • ISBN-13: 978-0813109312
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.2 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,070,901 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Robert Rennick is the dean of Kentucky place names, and this short (< 75p) has vignettes of the history and naming of the more interesting place names In case you are interested in the title, Monkey's Eyebrow is a small city in Ballard County perhaps named sometime before 1900, for, what else, Monkey's Eyebrows. Some of my favorite pieces include nearby Elkhorn Creek, Mousie (named for a daughter of a large landowner, whose other daughter is named Kitty) and Nobob and Nolynn. The source of the names is varied, but I like Peewee Valley, being named for a singing bird, when the city officials couldn't decide on a name. Readers of this, as well as genealogists, and postmark collectors should find Rennicks "Kentucky Place Names" a useful reference. Readers may also want to query the online "Geographic Names Information System" for such interesting names as Big Bone Lick .. or ....
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Pure fund to read. I have not hesitation to tell you that you will like this book and probably read it in one sitting. Something else. I buy Any/All American place name books that I can. I love our country and these vignettes about these out-of-the way town inspire me to want to visit allof them. A dream of course. But such educational and patriot reading. Makes me happy and gives me "a buzz" about being an America
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Format: Paperback
As a denizen of Flat Mary Road in Eastern Kentucky (just up from Vortex, Sister City to Drain, Oregon), I had a ball with this book. The fact is, there isn't room to list all the great place names in this wonderful and eccentric state, but the author hits the high points.
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Format: Paperback
This short book is a series of stories that explain the origin of some of the more unusual place names in Kentucky. Rennick has spent a lifetime researching place names in his home state and, though the stories might seem tall tales, it is hard to doubt the veracity of the author. Not as scholarly and comprehensive as his book Kentucky Place Names, which is probably one of the best state place names book ever written, this work tackles the oddball names and is amusing and entertaining.
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