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From Still to Motion: A photographer's guide to creating video with your DSLR (Voices That Matter) Paperback – March 27, 2010

ISBN-13: 978-0321702111 ISBN-10: 9780321702111 Edition: 1st

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From Still to Motion: A photographer's guide to creating video with your DSLR (Voices That Matter) + From Still to Motion: Editing DSLR Video with Final Cut Pro X + The DSLR Filmmaker's Handbook: Real-World Production Techniques
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Product Details

  • Series: Voices That Matter
  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: New Riders; 1 edition (March 27, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780321702111
  • ISBN-13: 978-0321702111
  • ASIN: 0321702115
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 0.7 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #352,470 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“If you’ve been looking for the one book that teaches you how to bring DSLR video into your workflow, this is the only one on the topic I’m telling my friends to buy.”
—Scott Kelby, photographer, author, president of the National Association of Photoshop Professionals (NAPP)

“Whether you’re a seasoned professional or a novice still photographer…this book has the answers you need, even if you don’t know you need them yet.”
— Scott Bourne, Publisher, Photofocus.com

About the Author

James Ball is a director of photography for HBO, National Geographic, Discovery Channel, and PBS (onlinejamesball.com). His work ranges from feature-length documentary projects to dramatic features to corporate projects.

Robbie Carman is a professional colorist who works on broadcast television series. He is a principal at Amigo Media (amigomediallc.com), a well-known trainer, author, and speaker at industry conferences, and the Creative COW forum host for DSLR video and Apple Color.

Matt Gottshalk is the principal of McGee Digital Media (mcgeedigital.com), which specializes in cinema-style HD production and post. He is a lighting director and camera assistant for a variety of clients and an active member of the dvxuser.com community.

Richard Harrington is a director and editor. He is a Creative COW forum leader, a member of the NAPP Instructor Dream Team, and a popular author, trainer, and speaker.



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Customer Reviews

Buy this book NOW if you're serious about shooting video on your HDSLR.
Cynthia Miles
This book will break open the doors to that new world and give you tons of inspiration and facts to get you on your way.
Keith Kiska
As a trainer and a teacher, I recommend this book because it will help you learn well.
Kirby Francis

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Frank R. on March 16, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Mostly useless, because it rarely gives any information I might need. And often annoying, because I really don't need little bits of motherhood like "composition is the basic foundation for creative image gathering." Really, guys, you think I needed to be told that?

A lot of the book is fluff: two pages devoted to teaching us the abbreviations for Wide Shots (WS) and Medium Wide Shot (MWS). Wow--thanks! But then they never, never refer to them again. Or sections like Organizing the Planning meeting. Hey, did you know it's better to plan ahead than keep your expensive crew waiting around?

Who needs advice like this?

Let me tell you a bit of my story and see if it's anything like yours. I've been shooting digital since '06; I've gone through a progression of SLRs and now shoot with a Canon 5D mk II. I only recently realized it's the new darling of Hollywood and indy film makers, so I decided to give video a try. I set the camera on a tripod and got a buddy to play his guitar and sing a song. I think I did it in Av mode; no idea what the ISO was. Used the lens that was sitting on the camera already; never touched it the whole shoot. Three minutes later it was done; loaded it into iMovie and fumbled around until I could get it into an email. His wife loved it. I decided there was some future here.

My next idea was to repeat the process, but with two cameras and an external mic stuck on my camera--it was pretty apparent that the in-camera mic was never going to cut it for music. (Or much else.) So here's a list of all the stuff I didn't know--and could have used some advice on:

What mode to shoot in?
What shutter speed?
What lens?
Shotgun mike mounted on the camera or external recorder?
Can you mix cameras?
Read more ›
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By tyler on April 10, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book seemed like a great book for someone who has already been into film making but just bought a new dslr. I guess I should of focused on the title more. The book is truly for the photographer that knows nothing of recording video. The book itself didn't teach me anything I didn't already know about film making because it was very basic stuff. I was hoping that the book would get in depth about how to really get the most of the dslr but I feel like they hardly discussed the workings of a dslr camera. Most of the book could of pertained to any video camera.

On a good note, there was a few chapters that really focused on dslr cameras. The chapters about lenses, and video technology were good. The rest of the book was about basic lighting, sound, tripods, rigs, editing, etc...
I think that if you have little experience in video recording than this might be the book for you. However, if you feel that you know the basics of film making such as 3-point lighting, panning, and how to record onto sd cards; then you might skip this book.

The real bonus is the chapters at the end where they discuss stop-motion, time-lapse and distribution. It's not something I really needed to learn, but perhaps I'll take up stop-motion one of these days. Seems like fun.

I give this book 3 stars because of the little information that I think is valuable. I give this book 5 stars if you are brand new and your new dslr is the first video-capable camera you've owned.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Angel Burns on April 3, 2010
Format: Paperback
Rich Harrington and the gang have put together a PHENOMENAL and very thorough manual on the latest in HDSLR photography right now. It contains so much, including the thoughtful, artistic side of filmmaking along with the technical info (even down to specific plug-ins and software recommendations, links, tutorials and the wealth of material on the included DVD). Can't imagine how much work this must have been to collate, but I am grateful and will definitely be referring this to friends. If you want the latest details on how to be a (successful) early adopter of this technology, From Still to Motion will save you time, trial, research and loads of cash. There are also DIY tips for lighting! My favorite cheap cheat was the Chinese paper globes for soft background lighting. If you are looking to get into a pro setup, you'll do it confident in your purchases. I like how the book allows you to scale your experience depending on your level of expertise, financial investment, crew size, computer platform, etc. Whether a dabbler wanting to stick a toe in the water, a photographer looking to increase skills, or a high-level videography company wanting to add the new gear for a movie look, there's something for everyone to benefit. These guys REALLY know their stuff. A stellar primer for all! Grab it. :)
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By D. J. Haynes on August 28, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In parallel with other reviewers I agree that this is a well laid out, well written book, packed with information and good guidance.
If you are a photographer - professional or enthusiast - then this is the best jumping off point for the world of HDDSLR filming. Websites mentioned in the book will lead you to further indepth and invaluable reference material.

But I do feel I should mention that if you are from the world of filmmaking or TV then this book isn't really going to tell you much that you don't already know or can't find easily - and in more appropriate detail - on the web. As a documentary maker I was hoping for more technical detail on HDDSLRs and less generics on lighting etc - one of the drawbacks of buying from Amazon as opposed to having a look in a bookshop prior to purchase. This is of course my fault - there's nothing wrong with the book - but amongst the enthusiastic reviews for it I would just point out that if you are already comfortable with professional filming then this book probably won't help you much.

I've rated it 4 stars as a book for photographers about to experiment in video. If you're already in the industry and looking for detail on how to exploit HDDSLRs in your filmmaking...go elsewhere.
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