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From Sumer to Jerusalem: The Forbidden Hypothesis Hardcover – 1993

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Intellect Ltd; 1 ed edition (1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1871516420
  • ISBN-13: 978-1871516425
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 7.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,207,457 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Interesting book! The hypothesis is plausible but ... Well, after all Ur was a Sumerian city, and chances are that Abraham and his folks had at least some Sumerian blood. It is also apparent that the ancient Jews had a strong sense of cultural superiority. This also points to the Sumerians, who felt superior even to the Akkadians. And there must have been some reason why Abraham left Ur. The conquest and destruction of the city is a good one. This much is clear. But even if Abraham and his party were Akkadians they would have absorbed a great deal of the Sumerian culture and religion. Therefore it is relatively safe to say that the early Hebrews were culturally Sumerian and left upon the destruction of the city. Let us call this the weaker hypothesis.

But the author makes a stronger claim, that is that the Hebrews were of pure Sumerian blood and, perhaps more importantly, identified as Sumerians in contrast to the Semites. They were doubly traumatized first by gradual loss of their language and then by the loss of their city. The inventors of writing lost their own language! The creators of civilization were slaughtered, their achievements destroyed, their city and monuments laid in ruins! However the devastation caused by the fall of Ur would have been just as traumatic for the Akkadians. And even the Akkadians were culturally superior to most of the nations in the vicinity. The exodus of Abraham can be explained by the weaker hypothesis. Even if Abraham and his people were Akkadians, mixed nationality or assimilated Sumerians we would expect the same historical outcome as if they were pure Sumerians..

The Semitic king Sargon conquered the Sumerian cities around 2300 BC and established Akkadian as the official language of the realm. Sumerian slowly disappeared.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Leslie H. Schwartz on April 19, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is an extremely interesting book on a number of grounds.

First, it helps us understand the origins of the people who founded the Sumerian civilization, people who came from the east, likely after a great cataclysm, most likely the outcome of the destruction of far earlier civilizations in the aftermath of the extended end of the last ice age, civilizations now mostly underwater.

Secondly it helps us to unwind and separate the people who were Semitic and those who were not Semitic in culture and origins who lead substantially to the great civilizations in the region, Assyria, Babylonia, even ultimately Israel - Judea which by-in-large were comprised of people who were, or became Semitic.

Thirdly, it helps us understand the origins and context of Abram and his multi-generational mission.

The old Testament says Abraham came from the Sumerian city of Ur. This book helps everyone to understand what that may mean ultimately for the origins and history of the Jewish people, the context from which the Hebrew people and religion originated.

However, I would also suggest reading everything Sitchin wrote about the Sumerian civilizations as well, otherwise, you will still have an incomplete picture of the history, and the conflicts it has led to, in today's world.

A surprising article was printed today, 7/12/2010 saying that DNA testing of the King Tut mummy indicates his close genetic ties to Western Europe, this is very surprising, and there is a lot we do not know about the ancient world. This book helps to provide some background even when it runs contrary to the conventional academic views.
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7 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Richard Locke Peterson on August 1, 2005
Format: Hardcover
but less elaborate hypothesis in his History Begins at Sumer. Kramer thought Jews could be identified as "habiru"(he's not the only one who thinks habiru is awfully close to hebrew.) Kramer also suggested that the habiru are Sumerians, [or forerunners of the Sumerians], driven west by Akkadian [or Sumerian] conquest. Using like reasoning, Sassoon argues Jews would not then in origin be Semitic. [I may have details misremembered, it's been a few years.]
Sassoon credits Sumerians[Jews?] with superior ability and purpose, which shall be for everyone's benefit. [This may well be true in my opinion.] [I'm not Jewish, I'm not tooting the horn of my ethnic group.]
Beautiful pictures are in this book.
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