From Thessaloniki to Auschwitz and Back: Memories of a Survivor from Thessaloniki Reprint Edition

4 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0853033905
ISBN-10: 0853033900
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used
$15.16
Buy new
$23.70
More Buying Choices
11 New from $17.83 6 Used from $15.16
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Best Books of the Year So Far
Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2015's Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
$23.70 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Vallentine Mitchell; Reprint edition (April 14, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0853033900
  • ISBN-13: 978-0853033905
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,628,640 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5 star
75%
4 star
25%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Larry Mark MyJewishBooksDotCom on August 9, 2000
Format: Paperback
In 1912, when the Ottoman city of Thessaloniki was turned over to Greece, Jews outnumbered Greeks, Muslims, Bulgarians and other residents. In 1917, fire destroyed much of the Jewish center of town. But by 1926, when the author was born, the city a growing Greek metropolis. Today, it has 1 million residents, but only 2,000 Jews. In 1939, the population of Jews living in the city of Salonika had dropped from about 90,000 to 56,000. In less than 12 weeks, all but 500 Jews were deported to death camps. By the end of August, 1943, the 500 Jews left owed their lives to the fact that they had kept their Spanish citizenship. Dieter Wisliceny, Eichmann's deputy in Greece, claimed that 60 to 65,000 Greek Jews were brought to Auschwitz. By September of 1944 only 2,500 of these were still alive and many more died before 1945, when they were marched to other camps. By far the largest proportion of those who were transported and who died in the camps were from Thessaloniki (Salonika). Erika Kounio-Amariglio, the daughter of an Austrian-Jewish mother and a Salonikan father, owed her survival in part to her knowledge of German. Her father owned a photography business in the city. Her mother had fought hard to be accepted and seems to have succeeded in overcoming the family's initial distrust of her as a foreigner. Having given up her medical studies at Leipzig University to follow her husband to Salonika, her mother maintained a close connection with her Austrian jewish family and sent her children back to spend part of each summer with her parents in Karlsbad. In 1938, when the Germans occupied Sudetenland, Erika's maternal grandparents moved to Salonika. This is a story of the vanished world of the Sephardic community of Salonika. This is the author's history of the town and the stories of the ghosts of those residents who were killed killed at Auschwitz, and how slowly over time, people gradually reacquire those average human desires after tragedy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By DAVID-LEONARD WILLIS on January 31, 2004
Format: Paperback
Edmund Burke said: "For the triumph of evil it is only necessary that good men do nothing." This book is a grim reminder of that truth. The back cover tells us exactly what we will find. "Before the Second World War there was a thriving Jewish community of some 50,000 people in Thessaloniki, Greece. In 1943, under Nazi occupation, virtually the entire community was deported to Auschwitz extermination camp. That Erika Amariglio and several members of her family survived is due only to a series of coincidences, which started with the fact that they were on the first transport to Auschwitz, and of the 2,800 people on their train they were the only ones who spoke fluent German. Erika Amariglio's story covers the period before the war in Thessaloniki, the German occupation and the gradual tightening of restrictions, the transportation, the two-and-a-half years that she and members of her family spent in Auschwitz, the long death march back to Germany, their escape to Yugoslavia, and the eventual reunion of the family in Greece. It concludes with the author's return to Auschwitz many years later as a delegate to an international conference on the Holocaust. "
Creating a better world for our children is not just the nourishing of good but it is also the crushing of evil. It is horrible to be reminded what evil men can do if we just stand aside and pretend not to see. Unfortunately we need to be reminded periodically of this sad truth.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on December 7, 2004
Format: Paperback
At the turn of the century Salonica had a thriving and large Jewish communty. When one and half million native Greeks in Turkey were expelled by the Turks, many settled in Salonica, as it was the most commericial city and they had come from commerical cities themselves.

Durign the interwar period a larger portion of Jews in Salonica and Greece in general settled in Palestine, indeed the Zionist movement had deep roots in Salonica immigrated.

One of the interesting bits of history is that while Bulgaria is often seen as freindly to the Jews during the Holocaust, the most comprehensive terror occured in the wide area of northern Greece under Bulgarian occupation. The Bulgarian authorities readily and enthusiastically rounded up and deported Greeek Jews in those areas -- which they expected to annex.

The German SS did manage to destroy the Jewish community in Salonika. Thankfully eleewhere in Greece many Greeks helped people escape. Unfortunately in Salonica we saw the inexplicable collaboration of the Chief Rabbi Koretz with the SS.

Released archives now show a huge number of diplomatic cables indicating Washignton was fully aware of the situation. More damning is offical British policy of refusing to allow Jews to leave Greece.

With that background, Kounio-Amarilio's own experience adds the human dimension to this terrible tragedy and loss.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By William H. Beck on August 31, 2014
Format: Paperback
Very moving
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
From Thessaloniki to Auschwitz and Back: Memories of a Survivor from Thessaloniki
This item: From Thessaloniki to Auschwitz and Back: Memories of a Survivor from Thessaloniki
Price: $23.70
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com
Want to discover more products? Check out these pages to see more: jewish history, world history