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297 of 305 people found the following review helpful
TOP 1000 REVIEWERon November 8, 2011
There is a good explanation of the difference between true cinnamon and cassia cinnamon from this site:
[...]

Rather than reinvent the wheel, I am quoting some of the best of the above article here which helped me make the decision to buy this product...

"Scientifically speaking, there is only one true cinnamon, which is most commonly called "Ceylon cinnamon," and comes from the plant Cinnamomum zeylanicum. The other type of cinnamon which you find mostly in the grocery stores is called cassia cinnamon. If the label just says cinnamon, it is most probably cassia cinnamon. Why is this important?"

"The term 'cassia' never refers to Ceylon cinnamon but rather to other species of cinnamon, including Cinnamomum cassia (alternatively called Cinnamomum aromaticaum) and Cinnamomum burmannii. While most simply referred to as "cassia," you'll often find Cinnamomum aromaticaum being referred to as 'Chinese cinnamon' or 'Saigon cinnamon,' and you'll find Cinnamomum burmannii being called "Java cinnamon" or 'Padang cassia'."

"Ceylon cinnamon is typically more expensive than any of the cassia versions, and it is also the cinnamon more closely associated with potential health benefits involving blood sugar regulation. To me, cassia cinnamon is stronger tasting while Ceylon cinnamon is more delicate."

"What true cinnamon and cassia do not have in common is their coumarin content. Coumarins are naturally occurring plant components that can have strong anticoagulant properties. Because our blood needs to maintain its ability to coagulate in times of injury, excessive intake of coumarins over a prolonged period of time can pose health risks. While the level of naturally occurring coumarins in Ceylon cinnamon appears to be very small and lower than the amount that could cause health risks, the level of naturally occurring coumarins in the cassia cinnamons appears to be much higher and may pose a risk to some individuals if consumed in substantial amounts on a regular basis. For this reason, organizations like the Federal Institute for Risk Assessment in Berlin, Germany have recommended that large amounts of the cassia cinnamons be avoided."

Since it is harder to find Ceylon cinnamon in the grocery store, you might find it at places like Trader Joes or whole foods. I do not have either of those stores within an hour drive, so I get mine at places like Amazon.com which has it in bulk at very good prices. This particular brand is a good price on Amazon.com and I just re-fill an old shaker I have on hand from the bulk bag. This is good cinnamon and a regular in my kitchen.
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105 of 107 people found the following review helpful
on November 28, 2011
I am a type 2 diabetic and it is under excellent control. Nevertheless, I'm always looking for ways to give me a hand with it. I read that Ceylon cinnamon was the 'real' thing so I purchased a pound of it last summer and have been using it. I did not change anything else in my diet. Two weeks ago I had my six-month check-up and my 3-month levels were WAY down. We were all quite surprised and although I do get outside and do more work in the summer, which might help a bit, it has not helped to that degree in years past. I'm thinking it was the cinnamon, which I use quite a bit in cooking and in the breads I make (I make all our own). Yes, it's got a great taste, but I'm afraid I'm not much of a gourmet when it comes to cinnamon -- I like it in whatever form it comes in! I am thinking, though, that there really is something to the claims being made for this stuff in terms of blood sugar control. I'm ordering more now.
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76 of 82 people found the following review helpful
on December 21, 2012
I've been eating "normal" Cinnamon my whole life, and always thought of it as something where you can have too much: it starts being bitter when you add too much, and you need to balance it with sugar after you hit that threshold.

This stuff though, is so mild and almost sweet that I can add half a tablespoon to my milk or protein shake and it just makes it taste better and better, almost like holiday nog. I now crave this stuff to where I suspect that what I figured was a 5-year supply (16 oz) will probably only last me a few months.

Note on packaging: you definitely will want to transfer this to another container for daily use. This spice is so fine that closing the bag causes a cloud of it to shoot out, and slowly settle onto the counter over the next few hours, leaving a brown dusting. I fill a tall spice shaker outdoors or in the sink, and keep the rest sealed in this bag, refilling the spice shaker every month or so.
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68 of 74 people found the following review helpful
I read a lot of conflicting info on which was the BEST cinnamon (I'm talking about taste not the health benefits). It was down to the Ceylon and the Korintje. I was looking for the taste closest to Cinnabon's Makara® Cinnamon. I took 2 photos showing 3 different cinnamon. (See photos)

I made sure to buy the same brand of the 2. What I find:

1. The cinnamon in the front is Kirkland brand and IMO equal to the others. Once I go thru all this cinnamon I will most likely go back to it.

2. The Korintje is a darker cinnamon leaning towards the red side. Kirkland is more brown. Ceylon had a yellowish brown hue to it.

3. The Korintje had a sweeter taste (think cinnamon rolls, apple pie, coffee cake). Ceylon seems to have a HINT of heat to it (think red hots, big red, cinnamon toothpicks). Though I have read where ppl say the opposite, so this is only my opinion.

4. If you are looking at cinnamon for health benefits. You want the Ceylon. It's lower in coumarin for taking it at therapetic levels. If you are using it for cooking, either will work (you aren't using no where near as much).

5. If you are looking for the closest to the Makara® that would be the Korintje in color and taste.

If I had to pick one of the 2 Frontier cinnamon, I'd go with the Korintje. IMO it's sweeter and the color is more appealing to me. I also mainly bake w/ cinnamon so like the sweeter side.

Update 5/18/13
I mix this w/ the Korintje cinnamon and have found that to be as close as it gets to Cinnabon. Makara Cinnamon from Indonesian mountains is what Cinnabon uses but to my knowledge it is only available to Cinnabon. I have done taste tests of my homemade cinnamon rolls to Cinnabon w/ family, friends and neighbors and surprisingly they always pick MINE as better tasting.
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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
on July 16, 2012
There is no going back. The Ceylon Cinnamon is strong/subtle, sweet/spicy. I've added it to my morning Greek Yoghurt with honey and ground flax seeds. Oh my! I will always buy this!! NO GOING BACK!!!!!
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33 of 38 people found the following review helpful
on March 29, 2012
For health benefits, simply make your own capsules using vegecaps. Easy and a much more affordable way to get a lot of cinnamon in. 5 - 00 size caps = 1 tsp.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on July 12, 2013
All of the "cinnamon" that I've found in supermarkets, warehouse stores, and health food stores were not real cinnamon, but instead mislabeled cassia. The only way to be reasonably certain that you are getting real cinnamon is to see the word 'Ceylon' somewhere on its labeling.

TIPS

Beware of products from McCormick, because not only their "Saigon Cinnamon", but also their regular "cinnamon" are both really cassia.

Cassia contains up to 1200 times as much coumarin in it as true cinnamon. Search the web to find out what is unhealthful about coumarin. Learn also why most of the exported true cinnamon in the world goes to Germany.

Search the web for articles instructing how to identify the appearance of true cinnamon. The info is out there.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on June 16, 2014
Although I am re-stocking my supply of ceylon cinnamon through Amazon today, I originally bought it through iherb.com. I find that ceylon cinnamon is extremely variable in quality depending on where you buy it. I have purchased it from the following companies other than Frontier: Penzey's Spices, Mountainroseherbs.com, myspicesage.com, and oregon spice. The first time I bought it through mountainrose, opened the package, tasted it, and almost threw it out because it had no flavor, tasted almost like cardboard. So I ordered some from penzey's thinking theirs would have to be better. It tasted the same, maybe a tiny bit more floral/orangey flavor, but not much. Then I ordered from Frontier. Wow! What a difference! A delightful sweet floral and orange-tasting powder. It is not the same as cassia cinnamon, which is sweet and sharp, like Red Hots candies, but a delightful mild taste. I then bought some from myspicesage, and I contacted them about the purchase, because their supposed ceylon cinnamon had that sharp strong taste of cassia, sort of like Vietnamese cinnamon. They insisted it was ceylon cinnamon, I insisted it wasn't. I think their supplier rooked them. They are an excellent company otherwise. Then I bought some from Oregon Spice, also an excellent company. This one was the worst! It didn't taste like ANY variety of cinnamon. And it was bad. I didn't even swallow it. I have ordered Frontier's 3 times now, and each bag is delightful, not weak tasting, strong (for Ceylon Cinnamon), sweet and wonderful.
I started using Ceylon cinnamon originally because I read an article in a medical journal that stated it not only prevented the tau tangles that are a precursor to and an important feature of Alzheimer's dementia, but also REVERSED hyperphosphorylated tau. Since Alzheimers runs in my family, I do everything in my power to prevent this disease (I am 64). It is likely, even probable, that the cinnamon most of us grew up with, cassia, contains many or all of the same components as Ceylon. However, cassia also contains large quantities of coumarin which (although coumarin does have some beneficial qualities) WILL DAMAGE YOUR LIVER if used frequently. So if your prefer cassia, but want to obtain some of the same benefits as ceylon cinnamon for your brain, I suggest not using the powder, except in small culinary quantites. Instead, you can STEEP chunks of cassia cinnamon in hot water, just as you would tea (except maybe longer), This will avoid over-consumption of cassia's coumarin, as coumarin is only poorly water soluble--so don't boil it, just let it steep. Ceylon cinnamon contains coumarin as well, but only in negligible quantities, so you are safe consuming it as powder. I use a teaspoon or two a day in coffee. Bear in mind that there has been no research that I am aware of indicating cassia's effectiveness for dementia/tau tangle prevention.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on July 4, 2012
You haven't had cinnamon until you've had Ceylon cinnamon. I never though tcinnamon could taste like this. Its pungent and flavorful, it's actually exotic.
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
on January 21, 2013
It's a product you either like or you don't. It does not have the traditional cinnamon flavor that I love. I would suggest that you buy a small sample.
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