Fugitive Denim and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$13.79
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.95
  • Save: $3.16 (19%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In stock but may require an extra 1-2 days to process.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Fugitive Denim: A Moving Story of People and Pants in the Borderless World of Global Trade Paperback – April 20, 2009


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.79
$8.24 $2.00


Frequently Bought Together

Fugitive Denim: A Moving Story of People and Pants in the Borderless World of Global Trade + Code of the Street: Decency, Violence, and the Moral Life of the Inner City + The Cosmopolitan Canopy: Race and Civility in Everyday Life
Price for all three: $40.21

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; Reprint edition (April 20, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393335429
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393335422
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #26,914 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Smart and ambitious, cosmopolite journalist Snyder maps the global garment industry, beginning in a New York loft where designers plot a line of ultra-pricy, socially responsible jeans that would ensure a fair wage for workers and not cause excessive environmental degradation. From there she visits cotton growers in Azerbaijan, denim specialists in Italy and factories in Cambodia and China. An excellent reporter, Snyder talks comfortably to both sophisticated designers and factory workers, conveying their very different motives as she paints a picture of an industry far more tangled than most consumers imagine. She notes that economic and employment shifts are felt globally, describing Italy mourning the loss of manufacturing to cheaper factories in Asia, where low-paying jobs represent unprecedented opportunity to many workers. If the prose occasionally verges on cuteness, it's preferable to the jargon of quotas and NGOs ubiquitous in most discussions of global trade. Snyder's investigation is an essential read for those curious about fashion or the globe-spanning business that produces their clothes. (Dec.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

“A thoughtful, ultimately hopeful look at how our choices about something as mundane as jeans can alter the lives of people 10,000 miles away.” (Fast Company)

“Contains a number of surprises about the most ubiquitous of clothes. . . . Ultimately Snyder gets readers to think about the real costs of clothing, and it’s likely they won’t look at $30 or $200 jeans the same way again.” (Kathryn Masterson - Chicago Tribune)

More About the Author

Rachel Louise Snyder is a writer, professor and public radio commentator. Her first book Fugitive Denim: A Moving Story of People and Pants in the Borderless World of Global Trade was published in 2007 by WW Norton. An excerpt of the book -aired on This American Life and won an Overseas Press Club Award. Her second book, a novel set in Oak Park, Illinois and entitled What We've Lost is Nothing will be published in January, 2014 by Scribner. Snyder's print work has also appeared in the the New Yorker, New York Times magazine, Slate, Salon, the Washington Post, the Huffington Post, the Chicago Tribune, Men's Journal, Jane, Travel and Leisure, the New Republic, Redbook and Glamour. She hosted the nationally-syndicated global affairs series "Latitudes" on public radio, and her stories have aired on Marketplace and All Things Considered. Snyder has traveled to more than 50 countries and lived in London from 1999 - 2001 and in Phnom Penh, Cambodia from 2003 - 2009. In the summer of 2009, she relocated to Washington, DC, where she is currently an assistant professor in the MFA creative writing program at American University.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
9
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 12 customer reviews
She writes in a clear, concise manner with ample footnote and endnote support.
Dave Kinnear
I read this book for a book review for my international business class and really enjoyed it.
Nekogeisha
Equal parts witty and profound, Fugitive Denim will change the way you look at your jeans.
Skunk Tabby

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Dave Kinnear on December 31, 2007
Format: Hardcover
A month or so ago, I received a call from an excited colleague who was wondering if I'd be willing to review a book for her. It seems her friend had just successfully published a book and was to begin publicizing it in a round of events. My reply was, "Sure, have the publisher send me a copy." A couple of weeks later, a review copy of Fugitive Denim arrived and I thought, "What have I done? This may be tough to get through." Well, instead I had a tough time putting it down. Far from a dry treatise on globalization, I found myself immersed in the lives of several characters and wanting to know more about them and how they were "getting along." Ms. Snyder, in discussing her book with friends took to joking that it was "about the people in your pants." Indeed! This intriguing story about the people who make our clothes educated me on some of the intricacies of globalization in general and the garment industry in particular. The peoples' stories are compelling; from Mehman Husseinov who loves cotton, to Rogan who designs denim garments with soul and style to Alison and Bono (Paul) Hewson who want to support workers worldwide and Scott, the auditor who said, "The only boundaries that exist, exist in your own mind."

Snyder is an award winning (Overseas Press Award) investigative journalist. She has written for the New York Times Magazine, Slate, Glamour, Jane, Salon and the New Republic. Her considerable skills are on display in this book. She writes in a clear, concise manner with ample footnote and endnote support. Yet she has managed to weave story that wends its way from Cambodia to Azerbaijan to New York and points in between. Her ability to use an incredible amount of detail to build her characters successfully propels the story forward.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Elizabeth Mohler on December 20, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Here's a fascinating book about the economic, agricultural, environmental, political and socioeconomic effect of purchasing a pair of jeans. Everywhere you go people are wearing jeans. Everyone I know owns at least one pair. Around the world thousands of people are wishing you would buy a pair of jeans. In fact their livelihood depends on it. The global denim industry is a $55-billion-a-year business.
This book by an international journalist, is an amazing journey from the cotton fields of Azerbaijan to sweat shops in Cambodia, to the politics of Capitol Hill, to an award winning designer whose goal is to save the planet. I now look more closely at the jeans people are wearing and my opinion about buying another pair of jeans has been challenged.

Rachel is a brilliant, funny writer who researched her topic with amazing detail. Despite language and cultural barriers, she was able to get into the hearts and minds of the people who make a living off the making and selling of blue jeans. The garment industry, which employs as many as 40 million people, is an often overlooked industry, and thousands of employees are in jeopardy when bad weather destroys a field of cotton, international tax laws get appealed or a NY designer changes the cut of a pant leg. This book truly is about the people in your pants and the work they do so we can look and feel good in our favorite pair of jeans.

Liz Mohler, M.S.
Executive Career Coach
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Julie B. Gibson on January 18, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Man oh man, this is a really interesting important and globe-trotted work. I highly recommend following Rachel Louis Snyder's "thread" between countries, working people, cultural icons and raw material. In the process you will learn about some facinating trade laws/practices, labor trends and most importantly your possible impact as a consumer. I found her narrative voice extremely engaging and felt like we coud easily share a conversation and cup of coffee! It is not easy to paint as far-reaching a picture as Ms. Snyder lends us. I can only thank her for the effort and urge readers to open to page one.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Loung Ung on March 12, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I'm a big fan of Rachel Snyder. I've enjoyed her
pieces in Salon, Ms., Jane and more. I've also
laughed out loud at her stories on NPR's All Things
Considered, Market Place, and This American Life.
So I was not surprised to find myself chuckling,
gasping, nodding, and pondering the words of Ms.
Snyder on the pages of Fugitive Denim: The Moving
Story of People and Pants in the Borderless World of
Global Trade. This book reads like a novel with
characters that our well fleshed out and real--because
they are real! The story moves seamlessly from one
page to another and carries me right along with it
from New York City to Azerbaijan to Cambodia.

As a reader, I am in complete agreement with Karen
Masterson's review of the book in the Chicago Tribune.
Fugitive Denim.."Contains a number of surprises about
the most ubiquitous of clothes. . . Ultimately Snyder
gets readers to think about the real costs of
clothing, and it's likely they won't look at $30 or
$200 jeans the same way again."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ann Maxwell on January 13, 2008
Format: Hardcover
What I enjoyed the most about this book was the people - from the cotton farmer in Azerbaijan to the factory workers in Cambodia. Seeing and feeling how the thread of the global denim trade intersected with their lives was fascinating. Understanding how interconnected the world really is at the personal level was also thought-provoking. By focusing on the people and not the institutions, Ms. Snyder allows the reader to understand the complexity of globalization. It defies easy generalizations: lives are both better and worse through their connection with this global supply chain. Either way, their lives - our lives - are changing and the challenge is to understand that change (at the personal and institutional level) and find productive, creative ways to deal with it. Ms. Snyder's book is a step along that path. An excellent read for anyone interested in better understanding the global age we are living in - or if you are just curious to know the mighty journey your jeans made before landing in your dresser drawer. They have a prior life as world travelers!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?