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Full Faith & Credit Paperback – January 1, 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 295 pages
  • Publisher: Blue Book Publications (2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 188676848X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1886768482
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 6 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,326,197 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Character development was poor to non-existent.
Isha Beharim
I took it on a cruise and could not put the book down.....seriously.
craig@behedged.com
The characterizations are realistic and well developed.
RAS

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 28, 2000
Format: Hardcover
James Cook spins an interesting tale about financial collapse in America. His wealth of knowledge in regards to economics and financial markets makes for a believable and credible storyline.
The main focal point in the book is a likeable chap named Richie who succeeds while others see their assets diminished. His character is developed well within the story and you find yourself cheering for him as you get entwined in his financial dealings. His gutsy moves in the markets have you on the edge of your seat hoping his keen hunches turn out to be correct.
This book gives a unique perspective on the future of America and is definately worth the read.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By iffish on September 8, 2002
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book does an awesome job of weaving and integrating an education on various arcane aspects of our economy in with a real thriller of a plot. That's, perhaps, the biggest compliment of all: since page one, I have scarcely been able to put it down.
Along the way, you will gain a fundamental understanding of commodity trading, futures, stock options, currency arbitrage, hedge funds, derivatives, inflation, deflation, the relationship between the stock markets, the housing markets, the credit markets, the GDP, and long and short term interest rates. You'll learn about the mechanism by which fiat money is created and you'll learn how debt can be monetized. You'll also learn about the distinction between the Fed and the Treasury; how they can have very different agendas.
As a first work of fiction by an author who, presumably, had a message, I was expecting the writing to be really poor and the ideas all hackneyed retreads of what I've been reading for the last two years on various websites. Instead, the writing quality is quite good and the plot is really captivating, fresh, and believable with lots of twists and turns. Strange as it sounds, the author has actually taken a very moderate approach to what is possible. Character development isn't comparable to, say, Hemmingway, but it's at least as good, imo, as what I've seen in books by authors such as John Grisham.
The first several chapters don't read so much like fiction, as we begin with the stock market and the dollar at historic highs and the social mood ebullient. Then the market begins to decline, the dollar begins to decline, gold begins to creep up, and we're off to the races.
Read more ›
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19 of 23 people found the following review helpful By George Blackburne on April 6, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Fascinating book. When the stock market crashes, certain consequences naturally follow. Unemployment. The collapse of the dollar. A derivatives crisis. A government bailout. Huge deficits. Rising rates. AAA rated companies defaulting on debt. And so on. It leads to tax receipts that are 75% lower than today, and eventually to ... You gotta read this book. His logic is irrefutable. His conclusion is ... well, bring fresh underwear.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By O. Marschall on October 5, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This book is difficult to evaluate. As a source to learn about the web of economic causes and complexities, it is excellent: learning by example. The author does a wonderful job in connecting different perspectives/people that experience how their "normal" bubble world is falling apart.
As a novel: well, both plot and characters are not as perfect, but perfectly acceptable. Main character (and hero?) "Richie" is a shallow person, not interested in much, not having friends either (Bernie isn't really a friend, but more of an ally). When the family is "obliged" to stay in Vancouver, they can't cope. Even with billions on his account, his family just can't adapt to new people and environments (speaking of Canada!)? And the boring life they lived in the US anyway! this unashamed US-patriotism is only surpassed by Richies happy end where he decides to return to build up the American dream from scratch...
Back to the the description of the looming and unfolding depression and deflation, the author must be as lucky as his main character. He wrote it while quite nobody could imagine, much less believe in such a scenario. Now lots of it happens just in front of our eyes.
That's astonishing. One cannot other than congratulate James A Cook. He delivers a book that enlightens and makes us understand what many of us cannot believe is going on in the economic turmoil just now!!!
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 30, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Anyone who's ever maxed out their credit cards, worried about maintaining a checking account without bracketed numbers, can't recall what the word savings means, and doesn't realize what a nation of consumer spenders on a runaway buying binge could do collectively, needs to read Full Faith & Credit by James Cook.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Brian Ochsner on August 3, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Although the book was written in 1999 or 2000, the events that play out in the book are eerily prophetic to what we've seen the past few years, and what we're seeing today.

Events such as: A declining real estate market... increase in the price of gold... a proposed halt in home foreclosures... and Wall Street pundits (like Jim Cramer and CNBC) trying to convince Americans to stay fully invested in the US stock market.

The book does a good job to show how different people react as these economic events unfold. Folks like stock speculators, derivatives traders, stock brokers, gold traders (like the main character in the book), and average Americans who are hurting financially and wonder what the heck's going on.

If you enjoy reading financial/economic/investing books from an Austrian (or non-mainstream financial media) perspective, and want to learn more about money and markets, give Full Faith and Credit a read. It may not be a Pulitzer prize-winning novel, but it's educational and can give you some insight into the financial and economic events of the past, today and tomorrow.
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