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62 of 69 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outta My Mind On A Saturday Night
The other day, I heard the riff from "TV Eye" in a car ad. Times have indeed changed. Doesn't take more than 30 seconds to ruin a good song, does it? Atleast it was just the riff. I guess they needed the money.

So is this brilliant piece of madness finally getting mainstream attention? I suppose Jack White's endorsement in the liner notes doesn't hurt matters...
Published on August 22, 2005 by K. H. Orton

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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not as much fun as it could be! Looks good but....
Let's start with the problem and it is mainly that is a vinyl version of a digital remaster. Nothing wrong with that if it's done well but in this case you really feel it when Iggy POPS you because at most of the key vocal crescendos there are two Pops and one isn't Iggy. This is a great shame as the reproduction of the packaging is superb. It beats me who the vinyl...
Published on November 19, 2012 by Lee Wrecker


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62 of 69 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outta My Mind On A Saturday Night, August 22, 2005
By 
K. H. Orton (New York, NY USA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Fun House (Audio CD)
The other day, I heard the riff from "TV Eye" in a car ad. Times have indeed changed. Doesn't take more than 30 seconds to ruin a good song, does it? Atleast it was just the riff. I guess they needed the money.

So is this brilliant piece of madness finally getting mainstream attention? I suppose Jack White's endorsement in the liner notes doesn't hurt matters. In any case, it's about time this was given the reissue treatment. As always, Rhino has done a top notch job here. Sonically, it blows the low budget Electra releases away. And they kept the mix, which is more than you can say for Raw Power.

"Down In The Street" opens a vein of pure anarchy right from the start. And that's only the beginning. If Rock & Roll is all about sex & violence, then "Loose" is the poster child. The sound of repressed lust finally set free to wreak havoc on the unsuspecting world. A war cry for the sexual revolution, or just a tune about some crazy guy flashing chicks on the street? Either way, it's one of the best tracks on this album.

As for "TV Eye", guess it's about dropping acid & being stared at by your cat, but who really cares when you're hit with what Ron Ashton's delivering. Proof you don't need formal training to be a guitar god. Or hell, even know what you're doing. Things may mellow out a bit with the gorgeously sleazy dirge, "Dirt" but then "1970" kicks in. If there ever was a song about being "outta my mind on a Satuday night", this is it. Rumspringa from hell. Enough scorn & dersion to almost be a satire on Teenage Wasteland. Or drunken suburban brats everywhere. As for the title track, they emptied out the asylum here. A psycho jazz freak out, thanks to Steven McKay's manic sax.

Serious collectors & audiophiles can amuse themselves with the bonus disc of alterternate takes & there's even an unreleased gem in, "Lost In The Future".

Critics will tell you this is one of the most influential records of all time. Without a doubt, there would be no Ramones. No Clash. No Sex Pistols. No Nirvana. Not to mention hacks like Red Hot Chili Peppers. But leave all that for journalists to pontificate on. Virtually ignored at it's release, bargain binned through the years---I guess that's the price you pay for being ahead of your time. The reissue of their debut is just as essential. Simply one of the most explosive & unforgettable records you'll ever hear.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A triumph of the producer's art, April 11, 2003
This review is from: Fun House (Audio CD)
I could repeat the words of dozens of reviewers and talk about how raw and visceral the performance here sounds. What amazes me about this record, by contrast, is how -good- it sounds.
To talk down the musicianship of the Stooges as a point of punk orthodoxy seems beside the point when you listen to this record. The Stooges actually sound good here! The twin lead guitars that dominate the first half of the album do not sound sludgy at all, despite the heavy reliance on fuzztone and good old fashioned psychedelic wah-wah. They bubble and sizzle like a brain on drugs in a skillet; the wah-wah flares and trebles the sound at just the right moment. The rhythm section too is solid, and without it, this record would go nowhere fast.
Iggy, likewise, knows exactly what he's doing. Though he seems at one point to be yelping like a mad dog, and at the next groaning like a psychedelic Frankenstein, his delivery is always well timed and right with the band.
Given what everyone -says- about the Stooges, I have to wonder whether or not Mr. Gallucci deserves much of the credit here. This is one of the better engineered records of its time, with a sound that cuts like lasers. It is a remarkable performance regardless of who should get the credit.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A True Metal/Punk/Psychedelic/Rock/Jazz/Funk Masterpiece!, October 24, 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Fun House (Audio CD)
One of the greatest most influential albums of all time remains The Stooges Fun House. I'll admit, I was skeptical at first. But after listening these 7 songs became an important part of my life. They are so important they have remained Iggy Pop's biggest legend. Although Iggy is incredible, it is the drummer which for me, makes this album a classic. Just listen to that incredible break near the end of "TV Eye" where the drummer goes into that steady off center beat while Iggy repeats the main theme again. Genius! My favorite song however, remains "1970". Nothing takes you back to this era where everything was not Peace, Love, and Happiness. This brings you back to the 1970 of heroin addicts, campus riots, San Franciscan teenage runaways, the death of Jimi Hendrix, and the horror of Altamont. This song says it all in it's music and then Iggy repeats over a fuzz punk guitar, I Feel Alright. Listen to this album and be changed forever!
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars He Came To Play, January 6, 2002
By 
David Blakeslee (Wyoming, MI United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Fun House (Audio CD)
This Fun House, like the carnival attractions it's named after, is fun but also scary and creepy and not all that wholesome. Back when I first got ahold of this album, on a French import label (late '70's, when all of the Stooges' stuff was out of print in the USA), I tended to spend most of my time on Side 1 (the first four songs, ending with Dirt.) Side 2 (1970 through LA Blues) were just *so* brutal, but when that certain mood hit, I didn't know of any other music that matched it so well. I've become more accustomed to dissonance since then, I guess. What we have here is an amazingly sharp, dense, harsh and muscular sonic attack that really doesn't sound like music from 30+ years ago, at least not to my ears. I don't listen to a lot of new hard rock but I'd like to hear someone outdo these tracks for sheer power in the same amount of time. The songs never drag, actually the whole album is remarkably well-paced. Down on the Street kicks things off with a menacing prowl, Loose kicks things into high gear, TV Eye hints at the craziness still to come, with Dirt providing a slow-burn, catch-your-breath centerpiece to the album, before the out'n'out cacaphony starts with 1970. Once the sax kicks in toward the latter half of that song, it's like the afterburners have been lit and there's no turning back for the rest of the disc. Words don't do it justice. Lyrically, there is some mystery about what exactly Iggy is trying to say but the message comes through in the various grunts, squeals and howls that he cuts loose, adding another cataclysmic instrument to the potent combo that alas only held together long enough to make two immortal albums (the previous Stooges debut and this one. Raw Power, also a classic, featured a different guitarist and a much different sound, despite the impact it made in solidifying Iggy's legend.) Essential...
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A modern American classic, August 16, 2005
This review is from: Fun House (Audio CD)
A seminal album when it was first released but sadly overlooked. Jack White's notes in this cd reissue pretty much sum up the importance of this album . It defines American rock music -but still sounds years ahead of its time. There are numerous influences buried in here -Sun Ra, John Coltrane, [a hint of] blues, the Doors, Hendrix, Beefheart, etc- but this was, and remains, a unique album that actually sounds better with age. What really stuck me was how well the album flows. Although the Stooges were not particularly noted for their musical virtuosity (nothing wrong with that) these tracks had, by the time of the recording, been finely honed to perfection on the road. This also finds the band on the cusp of self-destruction but at their creative (substance fuelled) peak. Many of the vocals were live takes, but this is vital to the raw sound.

Overall, this is an incredibly powerful album and represents a real hybrid of the free- form acid drenched jamming of the last sixties, whilst looking forward to punk, new wave and grunge!

It would be wrong to use the term "deluxe edition" on a Stooges release! However it is worth mentioning the quality of this cd upgrade. On the second disk we get the cream of the long-deleted complete Funhouse sessions box set. The alternate takes are interesting and, if further proof was needed, confirm that the bad really were "in the zone" during these recording sessions. However it is the sonic upgrade on disc one that justifies the purchase. Rhino gernally do a great job on the remastering side but this is a huge leap from the previous cd version. And thankfully, polishing the sound has not in any way tampered with the original feel of Funhouse. A long overdue release and highly recommended to any rock fan (including Jack White).
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The ReMaster is worth it for the Second Disc., October 27, 2005
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Fun House (Audio CD)
The Funhouse Album. Can it get much better than this? Apparently it can. I'm not one to buy reissues, remasters, and such. I have found that sometimes a remaster can be worse than the original! This is one remaster you're going to want to get, though.

The opening track of the Stooges' Funhouse album is "Down on the Street". Henry Rollins once described the driving rhythm that begins this album as a sound that makes a person want to either f[...] or fight, but you know something's going to happen. This album scares people. It is violent. It is sexy. It is everything that makes rock and roll worth listening to. An incredible mix of rock, protopunk, and even some free jazz to top it off.

So, why get the remaster? Honestly, my ears are not in tune enough to be able to tell a difference between this version of the album, and my old beat-up version. That being said, you need to buy this album for the incredible Second CD that it comes with. This album was recorded over several days in Los Angeles. Each day the band would focus on recording one new song live in the studio (something that was not very common then, with emerging advances in studio technology). Every song had several takes and many different versions throughout the day it was recorded.

The second disc consists of several of the alternate takes of the songs on the Funhouse album, and they are incredible. The new and unique interpretations of some of these songs are something any Stooges fan will want to hear. You might even end up liking the alternate versions more than the ones you are familiar with!

On top of the alternate takes, there are two new tracks, "Lost In The Future" and "Slide (Slidin' The Blues)". These are both great songs recorded in the same session, and they come out sounding incredibly clear (most stooges collectors know, tracks like that are hard to come by). If you are a long time Stooges fan, you need to pick up the remaster. If you don't own any version of this recording, what are you waiting for?
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One Funhouse You'll Never Leave, July 29, 2006
By 
Zachary A. Hanson "Jazzpunk" (Tallahassee, FL United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Fun House (Audio CD)
. . . even if you wanted to; but if you're a fan of pure rock I can't imagine you'd want this wasted soundscape to ever end. The only complaint one could make about _fun house_ is that it ends; this is about the best criticism one could make of an album, as I'm sure you would agree. Iggy, the Asheton Bros. & Co. get more out of sludgy three-chord rants than pretty much anyone before or since (see anything by Boris for a worthy contemporary heir). The Stooges live up to their namesake perfectly here and continue to set the pace for extreme music on this CD, be it punk, metal, experimental, or otherwise.

My favorite moment on the CD is when Iggy yells "I feel all right" repeatedly over the sloppiest detuned dirge one could imagine. Andy Mackay lands in the middle of the wreckage with a sax solo; he sounds like an alien playing an instrument in tune here, making things as weird as they could be. Note to extreme musicians: Iggy & Co. made the prototype for your kind of music THIRTY-FIVE years ago using more than just guitars & drums . . . IT CAN BE INTERESTING TO USE OTHER INSTRUMENTS BESIDES THESE TWO BASICS, as _fun house_ all too clearly shows.

"t.v. eye" is another scummy jewel, perhaps one of the most memorable riffs in the history of rock (perhaps because it or something like it has been in a thousand other songs before and after--regardless, this is the best version of this riff). Iggy pegs paranoia to a tee and says volumes for anyone who has ever felt weirded out (a great portion of us, to be sure). The miracle is that he does it in a few words ("she got a t.v. eye on me . . .). An absolute masterpiece of minor-key minimalism.

"L.A. Blues" is another fitting and memorable ending to this inferno of a funhouse. Coming as this album did in 1970, this instrumental somehow serves as the capstone for the decade without anyone emitting a word. It sounds like a Grateful Dead jam gone way, way wrong, as if to say "Well, here's where your drugs and free love got you: straight in the sh**ter. May as will make the hippy dream sound like what it's come to!" The miracle on this song is that Asheton & Co. manage to show no musical proficiency whatsoever, just a mass noise freak-out without sense or sensibility. "Welcome to the '70's," they seem to be saying, "it's gonna get way stranger from here on in." Listen to it really loud and I can pretty much guarantee that you'll understand why Lester Bangs couldn't stop singing the praises of these guys and this song in particular. It takes great music like this to inspire the greatest rock writing ever.

Like I said, the CD ends here and the listener wants way, way more. Iggy never quite captured this sort of glory again, but fellow gutter-snipes like the Ramones, the Clash, and the Pistols were able to make some equally worthy trash-thrum on their own. Guess one never does leave this funhouse, after all.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "I've been HURT and I dont care...", October 23, 2001
This review is from: Fun House (Audio CD)
This is by far the Stooges' best and most satisfying work. Iggy Pop has often expressed his enthusiasm for the improvisational aspects of jazz and this type of free-flowing groove permeates the entire song cycle. Enough has been said about the Stooges anti-establishment punk/outsider stance and Iggy's street-lyrics. In my opinion, the most important aspect of this album is how the songs function as a cohesive whole--- from the opening track to the psychedelic jam/rant LA Blues... Also of interest are Iggy's intense vocal stylings, which are at their most effective in the uncompromising rocker TV EYE. His vox combine the unpolished grit of Lou Reed with Jim Morrison dark, brooding baritone. He uses these influences to create a style that is innovative and exciting rather than merely derivative.
Fun House presents Iggy at his most Raw, before being transformed by Bowie into the more theatrical, glam oriented prophet of doom that has essentially been Iggy's shtick since Raw Power. Funhouse is Detroit Rock at its finest, serving as a crucial blueprint for punk, post-punk, new wave and noise/art rock outfits to come. Not to be forgotten are the simplistic yet addictive guitar riffs that suit both the nature of the songs as well as the band's general musical direction. Rarely does a band hit the mark in bringing their conception of a certain sound to fruition in the studio. Although fairly polished, by Stooges standards, there remains a loose, live feel that helps the recording stand up to repeated listening...offering something new and exciting upon repeated plays. Truly a nice blend of pure rock, experimentation and musical innovation. Sounds rather fresh more than 30 years later, especially in the less-than-satisfying rock climate of the past few years. * * * * *
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Stooges Go To Hell, April 6, 2001
This review is from: Fun House (Audio CD)
.... The guitar alternates between riffs that sound like an industrial drill press to songs of three to four huge clanging sheet metal chords. Probably the same chords through all seven songs. The album is "stoopid" and pounding but only a few, even musicians with far, far, more versatility than these yahoos, have managed something as powerful as this. The original Motor City madman, circa 1967-1974 (Sorry, Ted Nugent doesn't come close), Iggy, along with his gang of delinquents, rushed through some thirty-six minute nightmarish phantasmagoric underworld and captured it on tape. The band claims they came into the studio and performed their current live set while the engineers somehow managed, amazingly, to bring definition to this aural assault. A recording contract with Mephistopheles must lie dusty in some back filing cabinet at Electra Sound Recorders studios. The band heads "Down In The Street", the first song/circle where the perfidious are relegated, and Iggy cah-roons "Deep in the night I'm lost in love, a thousand lies look at you". Ron Ashton's guitar does a one-two punch until at the "chorus" it turns into a sonic whirling sink hole where Iggy lets out the first of his inhuman, guttural, primal screams that permeate the album. In the second circle the untrammeled id of the Ig is let "Loose" like a wild beast while the band plays Deep Purple's "Smoke On The Water" in double time. At the beginning of the third circle, Iggy lets out a scream that sounds like a soul being drawn and quartered. No one can be sure what the song "T.V. Eye" means though perhaps it is the circle of Hell for those who in life watched too much television. The band slows as it sinks into "Dirt" sounding as if they are crawling through offal. Iggy tells you he's dirt and he doesn't care. When "1970" comes blaring at you, Iggy screams how maybe sex can assuage his torment, then he'll feel alright. The Stooges are joined on the rest of their journey by saxophonist Steve Mackay who blares and bleats, as if he were an amphetamine psychotic imagining he's Charlie Parker, and rivals Ashton's guitar in this flailing soundscape. No cool jazz here. In the sixth circle, Iggy sounds like a beaten animal wanting to crawl in from the "Funhouse" so his soul might finally feel peace. The album ends at the only logical conclusion: "L.A. Blues" is a heap of jagged noise, pure formless dissonance that will remind one vaguely of a Los Angeles traffic jam (I've experienced one, I know). After all isn't it plausible that the torment of the lowest circle of Hell would be to be endlessly stuck on a Los Angeles highway during a perpetual rush hour? Dante wrote it, but they played it.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Words don't do it justice, March 23, 2000
By 
Dave Lang (Coburg, VIC Australia) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Fun House (Audio CD)
Stating the facts, jack, I don't think it would be too bombastic to hail this as the greatest album of all time. This is what rock'n'roll is all about: a howl from the gutter, one big slab of raging noise. Originally released in 1970 to utter indifference (it hit the cut-out bins faster than lightning), this is now held in high enough esteem by the r'n'r cognescenti to have its own 7-CD(! ) retrospective box-set thrust upon the public, and rightly so! Working like a musical suite, Funhouse is a perfect musical combination where every single song - every single note - segways brilliantly into the next. From "Down on the Street" to the wailing morass of "LA Blues", it's a statement of utter loathing, yet, 30 years after its release, with its criminally belated status of a r'n'r classic - of ultimate liberation, too. There is no other album on earth that captures such a feeling of sweaty SEXY rebellion as this; it gyrates and moves like its barely in control, then brings itself back in line to deliver the punch. My god, just get the thing...
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Fun House
Fun House by Iggy & The Stooges (Audio CD - 1990)
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