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Fun House [Vinyl]


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Vinyl, July 23, 2002
$39.89 $36.99
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Editorial Reviews

The Stooges managed the impossible with 1970's Fun House, their second Elektra album: they dove even deeper into the chaotic depths to create a riveting, sonic assault that has yet to be equaled. Volcanic workouts like "1970," "Down on the Street" and "T.V. Eye" confirmed the Stooges date with destiny. Now available on high-definition vinyl -- from the absolute original analog master tapes -- Fun House lets you ride shotgun with these runaway sons of the nuclear A-Bomb.

1. Down on the Street
2. Loose
3. T.V. Eye
4. Dirt
5. 1970
6. Fun House
7. L.A. Blues

Product Details

  • Vinyl (July 23, 2002)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Sundazed Music Inc.
  • ASIN: B00006BC7V
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (223 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #345,383 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

Easily one of the 25 best rock albums ever made.
james dwyer
I'd just like to say this: if you ever like to know what Iggy Pop is really made of: buy this.
Bs De Vries
Iggy Pop and his Stooges are one of the great underrated classics of rock n' roll history.
Robert Blake

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

62 of 69 people found the following review helpful By K. H. Orton VINE VOICE on August 22, 2005
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The other day, I heard the riff from "TV Eye" in a car ad. Times have indeed changed. Doesn't take more than 30 seconds to ruin a good song, does it? Atleast it was just the riff. I guess they needed the money.

So is this brilliant piece of madness finally getting mainstream attention? I suppose Jack White's endorsement in the liner notes doesn't hurt matters. In any case, it's about time this was given the reissue treatment. As always, Rhino has done a top notch job here. Sonically, it blows the low budget Electra releases away. And they kept the mix, which is more than you can say for Raw Power.

"Down In The Street" opens a vein of pure anarchy right from the start. And that's only the beginning. If Rock & Roll is all about sex & violence, then "Loose" is the poster child. The sound of repressed lust finally set free to wreak havoc on the unsuspecting world. A war cry for the sexual revolution, or just a tune about some crazy guy flashing chicks on the street? Either way, it's one of the best tracks on this album.

As for "TV Eye", guess it's about dropping acid & being stared at by your cat, but who really cares when you're hit with what Ron Ashton's delivering. Proof you don't need formal training to be a guitar god. Or hell, even know what you're doing. Things may mellow out a bit with the gorgeously sleazy dirge, "Dirt" but then "1970" kicks in. If there ever was a song about being "outta my mind on a Satuday night", this is it. Rumspringa from hell. Enough scorn & dersion to almost be a satire on Teenage Wasteland. Or drunken suburban brats everywhere. As for the title track, they emptied out the asylum here. A psycho jazz freak out, thanks to Steven McKay's manic sax.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By S. Gustafson on April 11, 2003
Format: Audio CD
I could repeat the words of dozens of reviewers and talk about how raw and visceral the performance here sounds. What amazes me about this record, by contrast, is how -good- it sounds.
To talk down the musicianship of the Stooges as a point of punk orthodoxy seems beside the point when you listen to this record. The Stooges actually sound good here! The twin lead guitars that dominate the first half of the album do not sound sludgy at all, despite the heavy reliance on fuzztone and good old fashioned psychedelic wah-wah. They bubble and sizzle like a brain on drugs in a skillet; the wah-wah flares and trebles the sound at just the right moment. The rhythm section too is solid, and without it, this record would go nowhere fast.
Iggy, likewise, knows exactly what he's doing. Though he seems at one point to be yelping like a mad dog, and at the next groaning like a psychedelic Frankenstein, his delivery is always well timed and right with the band.
Given what everyone -says- about the Stooges, I have to wonder whether or not Mr. Gallucci deserves much of the credit here. This is one of the better engineered records of its time, with a sound that cuts like lasers. It is a remarkable performance regardless of who should get the credit.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By David Blakeslee on January 6, 2002
Format: Audio CD
This Fun House, like the carnival attractions it's named after, is fun but also scary and creepy and not all that wholesome. Back when I first got ahold of this album, on a French import label (late '70's, when all of the Stooges' stuff was out of print in the USA), I tended to spend most of my time on Side 1 (the first four songs, ending with Dirt.) Side 2 (1970 through LA Blues) were just *so* brutal, but when that certain mood hit, I didn't know of any other music that matched it so well. I've become more accustomed to dissonance since then, I guess. What we have here is an amazingly sharp, dense, harsh and muscular sonic attack that really doesn't sound like music from 30+ years ago, at least not to my ears. I don't listen to a lot of new hard rock but I'd like to hear someone outdo these tracks for sheer power in the same amount of time. The songs never drag, actually the whole album is remarkably well-paced. Down on the Street kicks things off with a menacing prowl, Loose kicks things into high gear, TV Eye hints at the craziness still to come, with Dirt providing a slow-burn, catch-your-breath centerpiece to the album, before the out'n'out cacaphony starts with 1970. Once the sax kicks in toward the latter half of that song, it's like the afterburners have been lit and there's no turning back for the rest of the disc. Words don't do it justice. Lyrically, there is some mystery about what exactly Iggy is trying to say but the message comes through in the various grunts, squeals and howls that he cuts loose, adding another cataclysmic instrument to the potent combo that alas only held together long enough to make two immortal albums (the previous Stooges debut and this one. Raw Power, also a classic, featured a different guitarist and a much different sound, despite the impact it made in solidifying Iggy's legend.) Essential...
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 24, 1998
Format: Audio CD
One of the greatest most influential albums of all time remains The Stooges Fun House. I'll admit, I was skeptical at first. But after listening these 7 songs became an important part of my life. They are so important they have remained Iggy Pop's biggest legend. Although Iggy is incredible, it is the drummer which for me, makes this album a classic. Just listen to that incredible break near the end of "TV Eye" where the drummer goes into that steady off center beat while Iggy repeats the main theme again. Genius! My favorite song however, remains "1970". Nothing takes you back to this era where everything was not Peace, Love, and Happiness. This brings you back to the 1970 of heroin addicts, campus riots, San Franciscan teenage runaways, the death of Jimi Hendrix, and the horror of Altamont. This song says it all in it's music and then Iggy repeats over a fuzz punk guitar, I Feel Alright. Listen to this album and be changed forever!
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