Fun Inc.: Why Gaming Will Dominate the Twenty-First Century and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$6.98
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Coleman Biblio
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Solid and unmarked with minor wear, ships within 24 hours
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Fun Inc.: Why Gaming Will Dominate the Twenty-First Century Hardcover – November 15, 2010


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, November 15, 2010
$3.96 $0.89
Paperback
"Please retry"
$3.35 $3.37

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Pegasus (November 15, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1605981435
  • ISBN-13: 978-1605981437
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.4 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,079,140 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“A detailed and engaging analysis on an increasingly influential medium. Even non-gamers may find themselves seduced.” (Esquire [UK])

“Sparklingly intelligent and nuanced... fresh and engaging.” (The Guardian)

“A lively, thought-provoking and thoughtful read on an entertainment juggernaut many of us have failed to properly recognize. A good book, too, for parents, who might feel far more comfortably informed about a sector that can come across as—literally—an alien world their kids inhabit.” (The Irish Times)

“In exploring the potential of the medium, Chatfield covers much territory, briskly and with intent ... His conclusion on what the future could hold is in equal parts daunting and lip-smacking. It should be read by gamers and non-gamers alike.” (Time Out London)

“A thought-provoking read for those already won over to the delights of computer games, and an even more important introduction to them for those who remain skeptical.” (The Observer [UK])

Fun Inc. is the most elegant and comprehensive defence of the status of computer games in our culture I have read. The sheer pervasiveness of game experience—99 per cent of teenage boys and 94 per cent of teenage girls having played a video game—means that instant naffness falls upon those who express a musty disdain for the medium. In fact, as Fun Inc. elegantly explains, computer game-playing has a very strong claim to be one of the most vital test-beds for intellectual enquiry.” (Independent [London])

“Whether or not you share Chatfield’s optimism, Fun Inc. should help to block the fear-mongering generalization—the riffing on prejudices—that has passed for insight on this topic in broadsheet comment pages. If critics of game-playing can’t bring themselves to enter these worlds themselves, to learn first-hand what they are talking about, they should at least read this insightful book.” (Times Literary Supplement)

About the Author

Tom Chatfield is Arts and Books editor at the highly prestigious Prospect magazine and also writes for the Times Literary Supplement, The Times, and The Observer in London. he has done puzzle design and creative consultancy for a number of online games companies.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on March 25, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Great overview of the the growing market and power of games. The book offers both a business view, as well as a cultural discussion on implication of the trends. What are the largest, or highest grossing media franchises to date? You guessed it: games. "Gamer grandma" may sound like a joke today, but likely to be the highest growing demographic for games in the not so distant future. Similarly, what is driving the meteoric rise behind "social games" and "casual games"? Can games be used to improve professional training or education? Hint: the answer is yes, and it is already all around us.

"Games" are often associated with the "escapist" and the immature, but that is, at best, a shortsighted view. Fun Inc. covers all this and more. Great read!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Johnathan Matheson on November 27, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Fun Inc is a wonderful guided tour through the world of gaming and the games industry. I find it strikes just the right balance for an informative tour. You're neither left feeling as if you're going over stuff thats already known, nor are you left feeling lost from something being left out or poorly explained. Entertaining and informative all around. A well crafted explanation of the industry, artistry, culture, and business of modern video games. Highly recommended and a wonderful read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Lynne on September 25, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I originally started this book because my grandsons are into World of Warcraft and I wanted to find out more about what games, in general, are doing to young people, how they are influencing our thinking, and where they can be of use in our lives.
The book is very well researched. I learned the history of video games as well as society's continuous enjoyment of all games from the earliest of times.
I did not finish Fun Inc. feeling that games were a bad influence on our youth, and I now have a clearer idea of the pure influence of playing with each other, via games, which is the essence of video games. They give us the opportunity to virtually connect, in this global society, to more and more people.
Games are good for us. Games connect us. Games make us think and do.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Catesby Elizabeth on September 6, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Truth is the gaming industry is there for a reason, and this explains so many reasons why. I found it very entertaining and informative.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By reelwhiz on August 5, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Very well written and organized to help me understand the gaming phenomenon. Clear information and insightful explanations about this creative mindset of generations that have come after me. I found myself appreciating the younger generations who desire to be actively engaged rather than passive spectators. Thank you, Tom Chatfield!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By T. Rodgers on July 14, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Maybe it's because I'm a fan of gaming, and am familiar with applications beyond what we typically see as 'gaming'.....that I found this book a bore.

As a defense against the preachers & politicians who hold up gaming as society's latest ill..... I just don't see it. I don't see the uproar. And if there was an uproar, I don't see the need for a defense to the nonsense beyond what would fit in an editorial page. Finally, I don't see this book as a particularly good defense, in and of itself.

Beyond that, the book is a meandering stream that reads like the concatenation of 100 essays on gaming. It feels long winded in places - like the awkward etymology of the word 'Avatar', which relies on the plot points of the movie 'Avatar' as a reference point, giving it the feel of a high school book report. Then the author never really manages to tie that concept in with the rest of the chapter.

For the right person, this might be a great read. I just wanted something a little deeper.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Search
ARRAY(0xa4af8bd0)